There are even those patients whose problem lies somewhere between these three disorders sydneyrx2014.com.au is the most popular in Australia, followed by vardenafil and tadalafil as active ingredients.

Facstaff.cbu.edu


Tennessee Academy of Science
2009 West Tennessee Regional Collegiate Meeting

Registration

8:00-10:30 AM
Frazier Jelke Lobby

Welcome and Introduction

Frazier Jelke Room

Keynote Address

8:05 – 8:45 AM
Frazier Jelke Room
Dr. Laura Luque de Johnson
Rhodes College Biology Department

"Traveling germs: infectious diseases in an era of globalization." The talk will discuss how
infectious diseases that are currently confined to certain regions of the world have the potential
to spread around the world given the right conditions. History can tell us that this has happened
before, during the Flu Pandemic of 1918. The question is what have we learned from past
experiences, and are we prepared?

Session 1 – Moderating: ???
Frazier Jelke Room A

9:00 INFLUENCE OF LUMINANCE CONTRAST IN THE AMPLITUDE OF
MULTIFOCAL VEP. Hope B. Shackelford*, Givago S. Souza, Bruno D. Gomes, Malinda
E.C. Fitzgerald and Luiz Carlos de Lima Silveira,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers
University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Universidade Federal do Pará, Núcleo de Medicina
Tropical, Belém, Brasil.
9:15 REAL-TIME REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE PCR USED FOR MRNA GENE
EXPRESSION IN FILAMENTOUS FUNGUS ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS. Chassidy
Groover*, Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Terry W. Hill, Darlene M. Loprete,
Rhodes College,
Memphis, Tennessee.
9:30 INSULIN TREATMENT OF SERUM STARVED HUMAN RETINAL
MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND THE EFFECTS ON THE APOPTOSIS
PATHWAY. Stephanie Parker* and Jena Steinle, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers
University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee
Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee
.

9:45 MAPPING OF THE 5-HT2A RECEPTOR IN THE EDINGER-WESTPHAL REGION
OF THE PIGEON (Columbia livia): AN IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY. Adam Luka*,
Jeremy Armstrong, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald and Claudio Toledo,
Department of Biology,
Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Universidade Cidade de Sao Paulo,
Sao Paulo, Brazil.
10:00 DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ONLINE EXTRACTION-LIQUID
CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD FOR MEASUREMENT OF
MK-752 IN HUMAN PLASMA. Courtney Colotta*, Feng Bai, and Clinton F. Stewart,
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
Tennessee, and Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee.

10:15-10:45 BREAK – POSTER SESSION

10:45 EVALUATION OF IN VITRO VASOACTIVE PROPERTIES OF NEWLY
DISCOVERED BK CHANNEL ACTIVATORS. Erica C. McMorise*, Anna N. Bukiya and
Alex Dopico
, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee (EM),
and Department of Pharmacology, The University of Tennessee Health and Science Center,
Memphis, Tennessee (AB, AD).

11:00 OBESITY AMONG CHILDHOOD HODGKIN LYMPHOMA SURVIVORS. Amanda
S. Hoeffken* and Monika Metzger,
Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee, and St. Jude
Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
11:15 OVER-EXPRESSION OF CKAP2 REDUCES COLONY FORMATION IN HELA
CELLS. Benjamin Jackson*, Lauren Keith*, and William S. Brooks, Freed-Hardeman
University, Henderson, Tennessee.

11:30 A PREVALENCE SURVEY OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN AN URBAN
OBSTETRICAL EVALUATION UNIT. Nakia Chambliss*, Jay Bringman, Romero Midgett,
Risa Ramsey, Robert Egerman, and Charles Gibbs.
Christian Brothers University, Memphis,
Tennessee, and The University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Maternal and Fetal
Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee.

12:00 – Luncheon in Hyde Dining Hall, Rhodes Refectory
Session 2 – Moderator: Dr. Jonathan Davis
Frazier Jelke Room B

9:00 EFFECTS OF SITTING TAI CHI ON MOBILITY OF FRAIL OLDER ADULTS. Alan
R. Fredericks*, Lawrence Faulkner, and Veronica Engle,
Department of Biology, Christian
Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee (ARF), and Primary Care and Public Health,
University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee ( LF,VE).

9:15 IMMUNE DEVELOPMENT OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER AT 1 AND 5 DAYS
POST ECLOSION. Kelly Towns*, Jodell Linder, and Daniel Promislow, Christian Brothers
University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and University of Georgia, Department
of Genetics, Athens, Georgia.


9:30 GENETIC EFFECTS ON ETHANOL AND OTHER BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES IN
ADOLESCENTS: ANALYSIS OF ATAXIA, LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION, AND
ANXIOLYSIS IN MICE. Michael Antone*, Kiedra Kincaide, and Kristin M. Hamre,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Department of
Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis,
Tennessee
.
9:45 COMPARISON OF FLIGHT PATTERNS AND HABITAT PREFERENCES AMONG
THE AE. VEXANS, CX. ERRATICUS, AND AN. SMARAGDINUS MOSQUITO
POPULATIONS. Blake A. Jackson* and Jack Grubaugh, Christian Brothers University,
Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and The
University of Memphis, Department of
Biology, Memphis, Tennessee.
10:00 ASSESSING AMPHIBIAN MARKING TECHNIQUES IN RECENT TOAD
METAMORPHS: RELIABILITY, EFFECTS ON SURVIVORSHIP AND PHYSIOLOGY,
AND CONSERVATION IMPLICATIONS. Stephanie N. Cassel*, Andy Kouba and Jon R.
Davis,
Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee (SC, JD), and Memphis Zoo, Memphis, Tennessee
(AK, JD).
10:15-10:45 BREAK – POSTER SESSION

10:45 CARBOHYDRATE DISTRIBUTION IN BAMBOO. Emily Wong, and Carolyn
Apanavicius
, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and
The Memphis Zoo, Memphis, Tennessee.
11:00 TEMPERATURE AND OSMOTIC STRESS EFFECTS ON AMPHIBIAN SPERM
FUNCTION. Marian G. Moore*, Erin L. Willis and Carrie K Vance, Memphis Zoological
Society, Memphis, Tennessee.
11:15 USING FECAL PARTICLE SIZE AND MICROBIAL PLATING TO GAIN A
GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF THE GIANT PANDA'S DIGESTIVE MECHANISMS.
Heather Gosnell*, Carolyn Apanavicius, and Rachel Hanson,
Christian Brothers University,
Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee and The Memphis Zoo, Memphis, Tennessee
.
11:30 A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF NONINVASIVE TECHNIQUES USED IN
MONITORING JAGUAR (PANTHERA ONCA) POPULATIONS. Svetlana Lapova, Rachel
Savoy, and Leandro DeSilveria.
The Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University,
Memphis, Tennessee and Jaguar Conservation, Emas, Brazil.
11:45 URBAN MEMPHIS PARKS AS CARBON SINKS. Jacqueline Gentry* and Rosanna
Cappellato
, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.

12:00 – Luncheon in Hyde Dining Hall, Rhodes Refectory
Session 3 – Moderating: Dr. Jonathan Fitz Gerald
Frazier Jelke Room C

9:00 GDP-MANNOSE TRANSPORTERS IN THE FILAMENTOUS FUNGUS
ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS. Laura R. Johnson*,Chassidy Groover*, Loretta Jackson-Hayes,
Terry W. Hill, Darlene Loprete
, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
9:15 CASE STUDY OF DEMATIACEOUS FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN THE IMMUNO-
SUPPRESSED. Alicia Scarborough*, Randall Hayden and Gabriella Maron, Christian
Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Memphis, Tennessee.

9:30 EFFICACY OF PRAZOSIN IN THE EXTINCTION AND RECONSOLIDATION OF
CONTEXTUAL FEAR CONDITIONING IN RATS. Melody Allensworth*, Fabricio De
Monte, and Antonio P. Carobrez,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University,
Memphis,Tennessee, and Department of Pharmacology, Universidade de Santa Catarina,
Florianopolis, SC Brazil.
9:45 THE ROLE OF BRO1 IN CLN3-DEPENDENT CELL DIVISION IN S. CEREVISIAE.
Brett Dagen* and Mary E. Miller, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
10:00
ROP2 GTPASE IS REQUIRED FOR PROPER ATFH5 LOCALIZATION IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA Jenkin Chan*, Jonathan Fitz Gerald, Rhodes College,
Memphis,Tennessee.

10:15-10:45 BREAK – POSTER SESSION
10:45
GENERATING ESCAPE MUTANTS TO MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES
DIRECTED AGAINST H5N1 INFLUENZA VIRUSES. Daniel Darnell* and Richard Webby,
Christian Brothers University, Department Of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, Saint Jude
Children's Research Hospital, Department Of Infectious Diseases, Virology Division, Memphis,
Tennessee.
11:00 IDENTIFICATION OF SYNERGISTIC ANTIMALARIAL THERAPEUTICS FROM
A COLLECTION OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS. Michelle Paul*, Rodney K. Guy,
Wendyam A. Guiguemde,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis,
Tennessee (MP), Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (RKG, WAG).
11:15 CHROMATIC DISCRIMINATION MEASURED WITH MFVEPS. Stephanie
Johnson*, Bruno D. Gomes, Givago da Silva Souza, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald and Luiz Carlos
de Lima Silveira
, Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee,
and Universidade Federal do Pará, Núcleo de Medicina Tropical, Belém, Brasil.
11:30 EFFECTS OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA ON PIG DERIVED ANNULUS
FIBROSUS CHONDROCYTE PROLIFERATION. Scott C. Berry*, and Richard Smith.
Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and University of

Tennessee, Campbell Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Tennessee Health
Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
11:45 DIRECT DELIVERY OF EPO IS NEUROPROTECTIVE TO PHOTORECEPTORS
INDEPENDENT OF GLYCOSYLATION. Ying Y. Wong*, Shayla Merry, Kishore Kodali, and
Tonia S. Rex,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee
(YYW), and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center,
Memphis, Tennessee (SM, KK, TSR
).
12:00 – Luncheon in Hyde Dining Hall, Rhodes Refectory

Poster Session Abstracts

1) INTERACTION OF MOLYBDENUM(VI)-CITRIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS TO MIMIC
THE NITROGENASE COFACTOR. Troy Greer* and Yahia Z. Hamada, LeMoyne-Owen College,
Memphis, Tennessee.
The chemistry of molybdenum(VI) (Mo6+) encounters very complex pathways even
when reacting with the simplest of ligands (the aqua ligand). Citric acid (Cit) is considered to be a simple
organic ligand. A di-hydrolytic complex of the Mo6+:Cit system has been detected using both a speciation
computer program and the potentiometric titrations in aqueous solutions at 25 oC. The speciation
diagrams showed that the percent of formation of this di-hydrolytic complex species overshadows the
percent of formation of the free citric acid species. The speciation program has taken into account these
species: the mononuclear species Mo(H-1Cit), Mo(H-1Cit)(OH), and Mo(H-1Cit)(OH)2, also we have
considered the di-nuclear Mo2(H-1Cit)(OH)2 complex. Among all complexes taken into account, only the
di-hydrolytic complex Mo(H-1Cit)(OH)2 has been detected in appreciable percentage. The UV-Vis
titrations performed at different pH values are in a good agreement with the chemistry literature. Further
experimental and theoretical studies are needed in this area.
2) CORRELATION OF SEED SIZE WITH FITNESS TRAITS IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA: AN
ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA AND LANDSBERG ECOTYPES. Nadia C. Winston* and Jonathan N.
Fitz Gerald,
Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee. Seed size variation is common both within and
among plant species and is often a predictor of plant fitness. However, genetic variation for seed size may
be reduced or eliminated by the roles of natural selection on other plant traits. In this trial, seed size and
plant fitness data were correlated between Columbia (Col) and Landsberg (Ler) wild-type strains and their
recombinant offspring. Col seeds are typically larger than Ler seeds, and this correlates with a larger plant
size in the Col lines. In the recombinant offspring, data suggested initial seed size correlated with the time
of germination and seedling growth rate, but not other fitness traits including seeds per fruit, height,
branching, shoots, and number of fruits. We can conclude that seed size can be genetically separated from
final plant size and other fitness traits. These results may have bearing on breeding strategies in
agriculture.
3) SPECIATION AND EQUILIBRIA OF Cr3+ WITH ASPARTATE IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS.
Jasmine T. Greene* and Yahia Z. Hamada, LeMoyne-Owen College, Memphis, Tennessee. Interaction of
Asp with chromium Cr3+ in aqueous solutions is presented. The potentiometric titrations demonstrate
strong Cr3+-Asp interaction. The acidic ion exchange resin confirmed the Cr3+ concentrations of all stock
solutions. At pH-value of 1.55 the UV-Vis of the Cr3+-Asp titration system reflected molar absorptivities
with the values of (ε λ nm ) ε 405 ≈ 29 M-1cm-1 and ε 550 ≈ 42 M-1cm-1 due to the 4A2g  4T1g and 4A2g  4T2g
Cr3+ d  d electronic transitions respectively. At the pH-value of 4.10 the molar absorptivities have the
values of ε 405 ≈ 22 M-1cm-1 and ε 550 ≈ 32 M-1cm-1 due to same d  d transitions. The corresponding values of the energies at these two wavelengths are ≈ 24, 691 cm-1 and ≈ 18,182 cm-1 which are in a good agreement with the Tanabe-Sugano diagrams. These data have been collected from a system that reached a higher level of equilibrium state. 4) INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH GROUP 12 METAL IONS. Shandera Gardiner* and Yahia
Z. Hamada,
LeMoyne-Owen College, Memphis, Tennessee.
Adenine is one of the five nitrogenous bases
(cytosine, guanine, adenine, thymine and uracil) that helps make up the code in DNA and RNA. These
nitrogenous bases pair with one another to make the "step" of the DNA double-helix molecule. Many
researchers reacted Adenosine mono-, di-and tri-phosphates (AMP, ADP and ATP) with almost all metal
ions, but not with free Adenine. This was one of the reasons we are conducting this study. It appeared that
Adenine is bound to these metal ions in a way that is yet to be confirmed with crystallizations or any other
tool. Thus far, we have collected the potentiometric titration graphs and have strong evidence that
Adenine is bound to these metal ions individually. NMR and Potentiometric dada are confirming the
binding nature of this ligand to these metal ions.
5) CHANGES IN SOIL CHARACTERISTICS BY ENGLISH IVY (HEDERA HELIX) IN OVERTON
PARK. Lauren Lambeth* and Rosanna Cappellato, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee. The
incidence of the invasive species English ivy in Overton Park (Memphis, TN) and the environmental
conditions of invaded areas were studied. Total English ivy cover was estimated to be 2.48% of the old
growth forest. To identify the conditions sustaining English ivy growth, soil pH, temperature, and anion
and cation levels as well as light levels were compared between plots with ivy (PWI) and without ivy
(PNI). Soil temperatures and light levels were significantly (p<0.05) lower in PWI. Lower light levels in
PWI suggest that English ivy prefers to grow in shaded areas, and lower soil temperatures in PWI are
likely due to the dense ivy ground cover that reduces soil exposure. Preliminary analysis of soil anions
and cations showed significantly (p<0.05) lower levels of phosphorus, potassium, and soil pH present in
PWI. Low soil nutrient levels in PWI may indicate significant nutrient uptake by English ivy.
6) POTENTIOMETRIC TITRATIONS OF MALIC AND CITRAMALIC ACIDS WITH ALUMINUM
IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS. Marcus Harris* and Yahia Z. Hamada, LeMoyne-Owen College,
Memphis, Tennessee.
Malic and citramalic acids are among essential hydroxy carboxylates similar to
the famous citric acid. From our ongoing efforts to study the interaction of various hydroxycarboxylates
with variety of essential and non-essential metal ions we are presenting accurate potentiometric work in
aqueous solutions at 25oC for the interaction of Al(III) with malic acid and Al(III) with citramalic acid
independently. Although malic acid and citramalic acid have a slight structure difference, (the former has
a hydrogen on its chiral center while the latter has a methyl on its chiral center); there are great
differences in their behavior in solutions independently and when reacting with the Al(III) ion. Our data
presented are in good agreement with what have been reported in the literature. The proper speciation and
simulation diagrams of these reaction systems will be presented and discussed.
Oral Session 1 Abstracts

9:00 INFLUENCE OF LUMINANCE CONTRAST IN THE AMPLITUDE OF MULTIFOCAL VEP.
Hope B. Shackelford*, Givago S. Souza, Bruno D. Gomes, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald and Luiz Carlos
de Lima Silveira,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and
Universidade Federal do Pará, Núcleo de Medicina Tropical, Belém, Brasil.
The purpose of this study
was to compare pattern-reversal multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEP) at different stimulus
contrast levels and eccentricities to see if mfVEP would allow distinction between the Magnocellular and
Parvocellular pathways. Four subjects with normal or corrected to normal visual acuity were tested. Four
achromatic stimuli with spatial Michelson contrasts of 100, 50, 25, and 12.5% were designed to test the
influence of luminance contrast on response amplitude. mfVEPs were extracted and analyzed to provide
signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the first order kernel (1K) and first slice of the second order kernel (2.1K).
For pattern-reversal mfVEP, 1K was absent and 2.1K had 75% of reliable responses at 100% of contrast.
The SNR of 2.1K was best at 25-50% contrast. Further study compared pattern-reversal with pattern-
pulse mfVEP, and concluded that pattern-pulse can provide better stimulation for clinical application due
to valid, above noise level responses with higher SNR. Supported by NIH-MHIRT5737MD001378-08.
9:15 REAL-TIME REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE PCR USED FOR MRNA GENE EXPRESSION IN
FILAMENTOUS FUNGUS ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS. Chassidy Groover*, Loretta Jackson-Hayes,
Terry W. Hill, Darlene M. Loprete,
Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
The goal of our laboratory is
to understand the mechanisms involved in cell wall metabolism in filamentous fungi. Currently, the lab is
examining by Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR the differential mRNA expression of two putative
Aspergillus nidulans mannose transporter genes that we have shown to complement Calcofluor White
hypersensitivity and hyperbranching in a mutant A. nidulans strain. This technique combines reverse
transcription and DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) creating fluorescent products
whose production is monitored in real time. Here we show the differences in GmtA and GmtB mRNA
expression during hyphal development.
9:30 INSULIN TREATMENT OF SERUM STARVED HUMAN RETINAL MICROVASCULAR
ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND THE EFFECTS ON THE APOPTOSIS PATHWAY. Stephanie Parker*
and Jena Steinle,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee
. This
study investigated whether insulin had an effect on the induction of apoptosis in retinal endothelial cells.
Cells were cultured in either high (HG) or low glucose (LG) to determine whether the glucose conditions
made a difference in the effect of insulin on the signal transduction pathway of apoptosis in these cells.
Human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMEC) were serum starved followed by treatment with
10nM insulin. Cell culture lysates were collected at 15, 30, and 45 minute intervals, along with non-
treated controls. Immunoblotting was performed as well as a caspase-3 ELISA. HRMEC cultured in HG
and treated for 15 minutes with insulin showed a significant increase in the phosphorylation of Akt, which
is an anti-apoptotic protein. Insulin treatment for 45 minutes significantly decreased cleaved caspase-3
levels in HRMEC cultured in LG. When compared to LG, HRMEC cultured in HG showed a significant
decrease in cleaved caspase-3 activity at all time points. This study suggests that insulin receptor
signaling interacts to decrease the protein caspase-3, and increase the anti-apoptotic protein Akt. These
changes occur through modulation of the Akt signaling pathway and the caspase cascade. Further
research could suggest that maintenance of insulin receptor signaling during diabetes may help protect the
retina from damage. Supported by: Ophthalmology Fellowship / UTHSC; JDRF 2-2006-114, Research to
Prevent Blindness (Dr. Haik, chair)
9:45 MAPPING OF THE 5-HT2A RECEPTOR IN THE EDINGER-WESTPHAL REGION OF THE
PIGEON (Columbia livia): AN IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY. Adam Luka*, Jeremy
Armstrong, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald and Claudio Toledo,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers
University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Universidade Cidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
The
Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW) is the autonomic, parasympathetic component of the oculomotor
complex. It is divided into two main regions. The medial (EWM) controls choroidal blood flow, which is
important for ocular health, while the lateral (EWL) controls both accommodation and the pupillary light
reflex. Serotonergic nerve fibers heavily innervate EWM, and to a lesser degree EWL. In order to have a
better understanding of the function of serotonin in the system, we sought to determine what receptor
subtype was located on EW neurons using immunohistochemistry. It was determined that an 80% of
EWM neurons contained 5-HT2A receptors, while only 54% of the EWL neurons were immunopositive.
These results demonstrate that the excitatory serotonergic receptor 5HT2A was in EW. This suggests that
this neurotransmitter is a major contributor to the regulation of choroidal blood flow by increasing blood
flow to the eye. It would also affect accommodation and pupillary functions. These results suggest a role
for serotonin in ocular health. Supported by 2T37MD001378-08, and FAPESP (08/51110-2)

10:00 DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ONLINE EXTRACTION-LIQUID
CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY METHOD FOR MEASUREMENT OF MK-752 IN
HUMAN PLASMA. Courtney Colotta*, Feng Bai, and Clinton F. Stewart, Department of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, and Department
of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee.
A sensitive HPLC-MS/MS method for
determination of the novel NOTCH inhibitor MK-752 in human plasma was developed using an
advanced online sample preparation. Dilute plasma samples were directly injected onto an online
extraction column. The sample matrix was washed, and then retained analytes were eluted out and
directly transferred to another analytical column for separation using a gradient mobile phase. The analyte was detected in an API-3000 LC–MS/MS System with a negative multiple reaction monitoring mode (m/z 441.1/174.8). The assay sensitivity was 5.0ng/mL (S/N ≤10.5, %CV=13.4, n=3). The method was validated over a linear range of 0.05–50µg/mL with a R2 value of 0.9979. Results from the assay within-day and between-day study demonstrated the precision (%CV) and accuracy (%Error) were ≤11.38 and ≤8.34, and ≤8.16 and ≤6.23, respectively. This method will be used to measure MK-752 in a Phase I study in pediatric patients with recurrent or refractory central nervous system malignancies. 10:45 EVALUATION OF IN VITRO VASOACTIVE PROPERTIES OF NEWLY DISCOVERED BK
CHANNEL ACTIVATORS. Erica C. McMorise*, Anna N. Bukiya and Alex Dopico, Department of
Biology, Christian Brothers University
, Memphis, Tennessee (EM), and Department of Pharmacology,
The University of Tennessee Health and Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee (AB, AD).
Impaired artery
dilation is involved in prevalent diseases, such as stroke and hypertension. Treatment of these conditions
might include activation of voltage- and calcium-gated potassium channels of big conductance (BK) in
arterial myocytes, which causes membrane hyperpolarization, myocyte relaxation and, subsequently,
arterial dilation. In the present study, newly discovered BK channel activators, such as C-10 hydroxy-
alkynoic acid methyl ester (10-HAME)
, 11-hydroxy-undec-7-ynoic acid (11-HOYA), and methyl-3-
hydroxyolean-12-en-30-oate (3-HENA)
were tested for their effects on resistance-size, pressurized, de-
endothelized rat cerebral arteries. The well-known BK-targeting vasodilator lithocholic acid (45μM) was
used as positive control. Among the three compounds tested, 3-HENA (2-45μM) showed the highest
efficacy. By testing myogenic tone responses to BK channel activators we are opening new ground for
developing novel and effective arterial dilators.
Supported by R01 HL077424 (A.M.D.)
11:00 OBESITY AMONG CHILDHOOD HODGKIN LYMPHOMA SURVIVORS. Amanda S.
Hoeffken* and Monika Metzger,
Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee, and St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
PURPOSE: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are at
increased risk of therapy-related long-term complications that can be further intensified by obesity. With
the increased risk of obesity in the United States, it is important to characterize if Hodgkin Lymphoma
survivors are at increased risk of obesity. OBJECTIVES: Identify risk factors at diagnosis that predispose
the obesity in HL patients treated at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1990 and 2007.
METHODS: Body mass indices of 341 patients with HL were compared to NHANES data at diagnosis
and last assessment. Odds ratio for obesity at last assessment was calculated. RESULTS: Obesity rate
among HL survivors is comparable to that of the general population. Age at last assessment, being
overweight or obese and hypothyroidism were all associated with obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Adult
survivors of pediatric HL have an increased risk for obesity. Early intervention for weight control should
be implemented at diagnosis.

11:15
OVER-EXPRESSION OF CKAP2 REDUCES COLONY FORMATION IN HELA CELLS.
Benjamin Jackson*, Lauren Keith*, and William S. Brooks, Freed-Hardeman University, Henderson,
Tennessee.
Cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) is a microtubule associated protein that is
expressed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Previous publications have shown that CKAP2 plays a
role in mitotic spindle functioning, although the exact nature of its function is unclear. The CKAP2 gene
is frequently upregulated in human malignancies indicating that it may be involved in the oncogenic
process. In this study, CKAP2 cDNA was subcloned into an expression vector system and transfected
into HeLa cells. Western blotting indicated that elevated levels of exogenous protein were expressed.
Using this system, a colony forming assay was conducted to determine the effects of CKAP2 over-
expression on tumor cell growth. Our data indicates that in the p53-null HeLa cell line, over-expression
results in a decreased number of colonies as compared with control cells. It is unclear whether this
decrease in colony formation is due to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis.
11:30 A PREVALENCE SURVEY OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN AN URBAN OBSTETRICAL
EVALUATION UNIT. Nakia Chambliss*, Jay Bringman, Romero Midgett, Risa Ramsey, Robert
Egerman, and Charles Gibbs.
Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and The University of
Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Memphis, Tennessee.
Domestic
violence against women is recognized as a major health concern, especially during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence of physical abuse among pregnant patients of an urban obstetrical evaluation unit in Memphis, Tennessee. The Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS), an anonymous survey developed by Mcfarlane and associates was used to measure the significance of abuse during pregnancy. The population consisted of 100 pregnant patients, 18 years of age and up. As a result an exploratory t-test on the sample suggested that the proportion of abuse in the African-American subpopulation was greater than zero as African Americans reported a higher percentage of abuse during pregnancy than Hispanics and Caucasians. Such results may allow physicians to better recognize pregnant patients who are at risk for domestic violence. By detecting physical abuse earlier psychological, physical problems and death to both mother and unborn child may be avoided. Oral Session 2 Abstracts


9:00 EFFECTS OF SITTING TAI CHI ON MOBILITY OF FRAIL OLDER ADULTS. Alan R.
Fredericks*, Lawrence Faulkner, and Veronica Engle,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers
University, Memphis, Tennessee (ARF), and Primary Care and Public Health, University of Tennessee
Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee ( LF,VE).
We sought to evaluate the effects of sitting Tai Chi,
when performed for an hour, two to three times a week over a period of six months, on mobility of frail
older adult residents (N = 40) in two assisted living facilities. Residents were assessed at baseline, three-
months, and six-months over six months during the intervention. Mobility was measured by the Timed Up
and Go (TUG) test and its components. Sitting Tai Chi did not show significant effect on the overall TUG
scores or the individual TUG component scores. It is possible that frail older adults may need more than
three to six months or more sessions per week of sitting Tai Chi, compared to older adults in the
community performing standing Tai Chi, to have significant improvements in mobility. The study may
have been under-powered. Sitting Tai Chi was enjoyable and safe for residents; with residents continuing
sitting Tai Chi after the study ended. Support by HW Durham Foundation
9:15 IMMUNE DEVELOPMENT OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER AT 1 AND 5 DAYS POST
ECLOSION. Kelly Towns*, Jodell Linder, and Daniel Promislow, Christian Brothers University,
Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and University of Georgia, Department of Genetics, Athens,
Georgia.
Current research has focused primarily on the aging immune system in Drosophila and has not
focused on the development of such an immune system. It is not understood how the innate immune
system develops in Drosophila, if it develops at all in an adult fly. In this study, we investigated the
average time a 5 day old and a 1 day old fly survived a bacterial infection. Our study suggests that there
is a difference in survivor rate between flies that are 5 days old and flies that are 1 day old, with 5 day old
flies surviving longer after infection. Our study shows that the immune system of Drosophila
melanogaster
is not fully developed at the time of eclosion.
9:30 GENETIC EFFECTS ON ETHANOL AND OTHER BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES IN
ADOLESCENTS: ANALYSIS OF ATAXIA, LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION, AND ANXIOLYSIS IN
MICE. Michael Antone*, Kiedra Kincaide, and Kristin M. Hamre, Department of Biology, Christian
Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of
Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee
. Adolescents have been shown to differ from
adults on a number of behavioral responses, and many differential responses are genetically mediated. We
are examining the relationship between age and genetics in behavioral responses. Responses were
examined in adolescent and adult mice of the C57BL/6J (B6), Balb/c, and DBA/2J (D2) mouse strains.
Mice were tested following an IP injection of either saline or 2.25 g/kg of ethanol or at baseline (without
injection). The behaviors tested included motor incoordination as measured on an accelerating rotarod,
anxiolysis measured in the elevated plus maze, locomotor activation measured in an activity chamber and
learned helplessness as measured in the Porsolt forced swim test. Strain differences were observed on
most of the tests. However, age differences were found on only a subset of the tests. Thus, genetic effects
on ethanol-related and baseline responses in adolescents occur in a test-specific manner. Supported by:
UTHSC Neuroscience Center of Excellence.
9:45 COMPARISON OF FLIGHT PATTERNS AND HABITAT PREFERENCES AMONG THE AE.
VEXANS, CX. ERRATICUS,
AND AN. SMARAGDINUS MOSQUITO POPULATIONS. Blake A.
Jackson* and Jack Grubaugh
, Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis,
Tennessee, and The
University of Memphis, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee. To characterize
mosquito Diptera: Culicidae) host-seeking patterns, collections were made at discrete evening intervals
from May to October 2008 at six locations representing three habitats in Shelby County, Tennessee.
Abundance and flight periods were determined for Aedes vexans, Culex erraticus and Anopheles
smaragdinus
as representative species of the major culicid genera encountered during the study. Ae.
vexans
, the most widespread and abundant of the three species, was collected in the greatest numbers in
late spring with peak flight periods occurring late at night. Second most abundant, Cx. erraticus, was
prevalent in mid-summer and exhibited both a late-night and a pre-dawn activity peak. An. smaragdinus,
which was not encountered until summer, was the least common and exhibited a primary foraging period
in the early-morning hours. While the greatest numbers of culicids were collected at rural sites, no clear
association was evident for any of these species to a specific habitat-type (Support: Division of Vector
Borne Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control).
10:00 ASSESSING AMPHIBIAN MARKING TECHNIQUES IN RECENT TOAD METAMORPHS:
RELIABILITY, EFFECTS ON SURVIVORSHIP AND PHYSIOLOGY, AND CONSERVATION
IMPLICATIONS. Stephanie N. Cassel*, Andy Kouba and Jon R. Davis, Rhodes College, Memphis,
Tennessee (SC, JD), and Memphis Zoo, Memphis, Tennessee (AK, JD).
Global amphibian decline is a
rapidly escalating and widespread problem resulting in significant reductions of amphibian populations.
Reintroduction of captive-bred individuals has key implications for the conservation of imperiled species.
We empirically evaluated the effectiveness of four marking techniques: Toe Clips, Visual Implant
Elastomers, Passive Integrated Transponders, and Alpha-Numeric Fluorescent Tags, in identifying
individual recently metamorphed Fowler's toads (Anaxyrus fowleri). Additionally, we compared survival,
growth rate, and physiological performance of marked toads to unmarked controls for 180 days to
determine whether marks affect the measures. We anticipate marking techniques with added mass (PIT)
or that affect morphology (TC) will likely have greater deleterious effects on growth, survival, and
physiology. This study will identify the most reliable and least-invasive marking technique for small
amphibians, which can aid population monitoring programs and improve assessment of reintroduction
programs' success.
10:45 CARBOHYDRATE DISTRIBUTION IN BAMBOO. Emily Wong, and Carolyn Apanavicius,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee, and The Memphis Zoo,
Memphis, Tennessee.
The Giant Panda is a unique animal whose diet is bamboo, a nutrient poor food. We
speculated that dietary carbohydrates, such as starch and glucose, are a significant nutrient. We analyzed
these dietary carbohydrates in the leaves and culm (stalk) of Phylostachys auroesulcata quantitatively,
with an enzymatic coupling method, and qualitatively, with an independent thin-layer chromatography
analysis. We found that there was a significantly higher amount of dietary carbohydrates in the upper
leaves than in other parts of the plant. The enzymatic assay suggested that starch concentration was low;
this was confirmed by TLC results. An average kilogram of bamboo contains about 18 g of dietary
carbohydrates. A Panda's consumption of bamboo averages 12 Kg/day, from which the estimated nutrient
contribution by dietary carbohydrates was about 200 g/day. Supported by The Memphis Zoo
11:00 TEMPERATURE AND OSMOTIC STRESS EFFECTS ON AMPHIBIAN SPERM FUNCTION.
Marian G. Moore*, Erin L. Willis and Carrie K Vance, Memphis Zoological Society, Memphis,
Tennessee.
Captive breeding programs for threatened amphibians would benefit from shipping sperm
between institutions for genetic management, but challenges exist relative to storage conditions and
temperature. The primary measure of amphibian sperm function is motility, which is directly related to its
energy output from the mitochondrial vesicle (MV) loosely associated with the plasma membrane. Using
the Fowler toad (Bufo fowleri) as a model, we proposed to: 1) test the effects of temperature on MV
stability during storage, and 2) evaluate the influence of changing osmotic environments on membrane
integrity. Results from our study showed that 4oC significantly preserved the integrity of the MV, sperm
motility and forward progression over time compared to 22oC. The loss of MV association and membrane
integrity was a direct function of increasing temperature and decreasing osmolality. Stabilizing membrane
function in amphibian sperm by manipulating temperature and osmolality contribute to long-term sperm
storage.
11:15 USING FECAL PARTICLE SIZE AND MICROBIAL PLATING TO GAIN A GREATER
UNDERSTANDING OF THE GIANT PANDA'S DIGESTIVE MECHANISMS. Heather Gosnell*,
Carolyn Apanavicius, and Rachel Hanson,
Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology,
Memphis, Tennessee and The Memphis Zoo, Memphis, Tennessee
. A method for separating Giant Pandas'
fecal particles by size was developed. Fecal matter was collected from two pandas, one male and one
female, at the Memphis zoo from May until July. The percentage of each particle size classification {large
(>0.75in), medium (< 0.75 in and > 0.31 in), and small (<0.31 in)} was determined after separation, and a
greater percentage of medium particle sizes was observed in both pandas. The female had a greater
percentage of small particle sizes. A second study researched the number of microbial colonies present in
one milliliter of a panda's fecal slurry using a ten series dilution. Female slurry platings had greater
amounts of microbes present. Combined, these studies can help determine how well bamboo is broken
down (indicated by size), and give a numerical insight to the microbes present in their fecal matter.
Support by The Memphis Zoo
11:30 A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF NONINVASIVE TECHNIQUES USED IN MONITORING
JAGUAR (PANTHERA ONCA) POPULATIONS. Svetlana Lapova, Rachel Savoy, and Leandro
DeSilveria.
The Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee and Jaguar
Conservation, Emas, Brazil.
Various non-invasive techniques have been developed to assess jaguar
populations and to monitor general condition of the species. Non-invasive methods are key to
simultaneously tracking multiple animals and protecting target species from disruptive procedures like
surgeries, biopsies, and anesthesia. Our study compares two popular non-invasive techniques: camera-
trapping and scat-detection. Camera-trapping involves automated cameras set up across Emas National
Park (ENP), Central Brazil. Canine-assisted scat-detection is systemized collection and analysis of jaguar
scats; the study was conducted in the Pantanal (Caiman Ranch), Western Brazil. The goal of the study was
to compare efficiency and goals of the two techniques. Taking into account environmental conditions,
population assessment capability, quality and scope of analysis (including diet analysis), and cost
management, we concluded that camera-trapping was best for population monitoring while scat-detection
provided a wider scope of information about sampled species. The study is ongoing; this portion was
completed during the 2008 dry season. Supported by: NIH 2T37MD001378-08 and Jaguar Conservation
Fund.

11:45
URBAN MEMPHIS PARKS AS CARBON SINKS. Jacqueline Gentry* and Rosanna
Cappellato
, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
Based on Earth Day Network data from 2002, the city
of Memphis, TN, releases an estimated 64 million tons of anthropogenic CO2. This study aimed to
assess how much of the total CO2 is sequestered and stored by the Memphis parks. To measure the
canopy coverage of each park, the amount of carbon stored and sequestered, the amount pollution
removed, we used the software program CITYgreen produced by American Forests. Results showed that
the 35 parks (1.5%, or 690 ha, of the total urban area) store 82,920 tons carbon and sequester 645 tons
carbon. Parks remove 93.8 tons (metric) of pollution including carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen
dioxide, particulate matter, and sulfur dioxide, a service valued at $51,7341. These values are significant
considering that only 35 out of 166 of the Memphis parks were included in this study.



Oral Session 3 Abstracts
9:00 GDP-MANNOSE TRANSPORTERS IN THE FILAMENTOUS FUNGUS ASPERGILLUS
NIDULANS.
Laura R. Johnson*,Chassidy Groover*, Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Terry W. Hill, Darlene
Loprete
, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee. GDP-mannose transporters (Gmt) carry nucleotide sugars
from the cytosol across the Golgi apparatus membrane in various eukaryotic organisms including plants
and a variety of fungi. Some fungal species including Saccharomyces cerevisiae express a single Gmt,
while others including A. nidulans express two (GmtA and GmtB) whose individual roles have not been
revealed. GmtA displays a punctate pattern of distribution indicative of localization within the Golgi
apparatus. Here we show that GmtB localization is congruent with GmtA in mature hyphae. Also, in the
lab created mutant, R205, there is a mutation in the coding region for the GmtA gene. Separate plasmids
containing GmtA and GmtB as well as plasmids that encode for GmtA-GFP and GmtB-RFP chimeras
complement the mutant phenotype of R205. However, GmtA and GmtB constructs complement the
mutant with differing potencies. Therefore GmtA and GmtB appear to perform closely related, but distinct
tasks in cell wall integrity of A. nidulans.
9:15 CASE STUDY OF DEMATIACEOUS FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN THE IMMUNO-SUPPRESSED.
Alicia Scarborough*, Randall Hayden and Gabriella Maron, Christian Brothers University,
Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Department of
Pathology, Memphis, Tennessee.
This study focused on dematiaceous fungal infections found in
immunosuppressed patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. This case study was focused on a
small sect of a large pool of fungal infections observed from the years 1962, the opening of St. Jude, to
2006. Twelve dematiaceous fungal infections were identified. The majority of these patients were white
females. Forty-two of the cases were a new diagnosis. Most of the dematiaceous fungal infections were
seen between the years of 2002 and 2006. The average length of the fungal infections was ten years. Of
the twelve patients with dematiaceous fungal infections, 33.3% had previously received bone marrow
transplants. This study provides a basis for susceptibility and duration of infection and will help provide
information for further studies concerning dematiaceous fungal infections.

9:30
EFFICACY OF PRAZOSIN IN THE EXTINCTION AND RECONSOLIDATION OF
CONTEXTUAL FEAR CONDITIONING IN RATS. Melody Allensworth*, Fabricio De Monte, and
Antonio P. Carobrez,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis,Tennessee, and
Department of Pharmacology, Universidade de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC Brazil.
In previous
clinical studies, there has been evidence showing the effectiveness of Prazosin in the treatment of Post
Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), a debilitating psychological disorder associated with exposure to
traumatic stress. However, there is much less evidence using animal models to support the mechanisms of
effectiveness for this alpha-1 –adrenergic antagonist. The aim of this current work was to investigate the
blocking of an adverse memory (extinction) when Prazosin 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg were administered in a
contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Prazosin 0.5 mg/kg administered 30 minutes prior to extinction
sessions on 3 consecutive days decreased the freezing behavior in comparison to the control and Prazosin
0.1 mg/kg. Our results suggested that Prazosin impedes acquisition of new learning. Supported by NIH-
MHIRT 5-737-MD001378-08.


9:45 THE ROLE OF BRO1 IN CLN3-DEPENDENT CELL DIVISION IN S. CEREVISIAE. Brett
Dagen* and
Mary E. Miller, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
The cell division cycle is a highly
regulated process that is essential for proper replication of a cell. The cyclin Cln3 regulates passage from
G1 to S phase by binding to and activating Cdc28. Proper Cln3 function requires nuclear localization
which depends on a bipartite type nuclear localization signal (NLS). Previously, Dr. Mary Miller, in
collaboration with Dr. Brenda Andrews (University of Toronto, Canada), identified 19 genes involved in
Cln3 NLS activity. Of these, eight were found to be important for Cln3 dependent viability. In these
experiments, we have identified BRO1 as important for both Cln3 NLS activity and G1 cyclin function.
Bro1 functions within the endosomal pathway. However, the complete cellular role of Bro1 is unclear,
and it has been shown to have other genetic interactions. Our data suggest a role of Bro1 in regulated cell
division.

10:00
ROP2 GTPASE IS REQUIRED FOR PROPER ATFH5 LOCALIZATION IN ARABIDOPSIS
THALIANA Jenkin Chan* and Jonathan Fitz Gerald, Rhodes College, Memphis,Tennessee.
Formins are
conserved actin-nucleating proteins that are involved in cytokinesis and cell polarity. In yeast and
animals, formins are activated by the binding of Rho GTPase. However, canonical Rho GTPases and the
required formin binding domains are not apparent in plants, so the regulation of plant formin is not well
understood. In this study, we examine the genetic interaction between the Arabidopsis formin, AtFH5, and
candidate regulators. In a wild-type plant, Atfh5-GFP fusion protein is well-packed and is centralized
slightly below the end of a growing pollen tube. In the absence of ROP2, a plant GTPase protein, Atfh5-
GFP fusion protein is diffused at the end of a growing pollen tube. This result suggests that ROP2 GTPase
participates in regulating Atfh5 during the developmental process. Though plant formins lack the
conserved GTPase binding domains they may retain association with the same regulators found in
animals and yeasts.
10:45 GENERATING ESCAPE MUTANTS TO MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES DIRECTED
AGAINST H5N1 INFLUENZA VIRUSES. Daniel Darnell* and Richard Webby, Christian Brothers
University, Department Of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital,
Department Of Infectious Diseases, Virology Division, Memphis, Tennessee.
Monoclonal antibodies
(MAb) are being evaluated as a possible treatment for H5N1 influenza. The major drawback to this
approach is that such treatment can rapidly generate escape mutants. An escape mutant is a virus that has
mutated an antigenic epitope so that it is no longer bound by a particular antibody, thus making the virus
resistant to treatment. In this study we determined the frequency of escape mutant generation to three lead
MAbs; 7H5, 10C3, and 3D10. Although escape mutants were generated to all MAbs, 10C3 had to be
diluted 10 fold more before mutants were detected. Correspondingly, sequence analyses showed that the
10C3 mutants mapped to a different antigenic epitope than 7H5 and 3D10, suggesting that this region was
less prone to mutation. These data suggest that 10C3 is less likely to produce escape mutants and should
therefore be selected for further clinical development. Supported by NIAID grant # U01AI070373-04.

11:00
IDENTIFICATION OF SYNERGISTIC ANTIMALARIAL THERAPEUTICS FROM A
COLLECTION OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS. Michelle Paul*, Rodney K. Guy, Wendyam A.
Guiguemde,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee (MP),
Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis,
Tennessee (RKG, WAG).
Due to the increasing chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum against drugs
that are currently used for treatment, there is an urgent need for new alternative treatments against
malaria. Mortality of malaria, which is currently estimated at one million per year, is at a constant
increase as a result of this chemoresistance. In response to this, a library of 5600 bioactive compounds
was tested in combination with two known antimalarials to identify possible synergistic antimalarial pairs.
From the screening, twelve compounds were identified as synergistic in combination with the antimalarial
artemisinin, and thirteen compounds hits with the antimalarial chloroquine. Of these synergistic hits,
sixteen have no previously published growth inhibition activity against the parasite. Supported by Grant
Number 5R25CA023944, National Cancer Institute

11:15 CHROMATIC DISCRIMINATION MEASURED WITH MFVEPS. Stephanie Johnson*, Bruno
D. Gomes, Givago da Silva Souza, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald and Luiz Carlos de Lima Silveira
, Christian
Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and Universidade Federal do Pará,
Núcleo de Medicina Tropical, Belém, Brasil.
The purpose of this study was to investigate asymmetries
with respect to sensitivity to chromatic stimulation using multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs).
A stimulus consisting of a dartboard pattern of 120 sectors at 75 Hz frame rate was used. Luminance
increments were applied to obtain 100, 50, 25, 12.5, and 0% Michelson contrasts, starting from either the
red or green phosphor. Analysis showed that the response energy was concentrated in the second-order
kernel in the first and second central rings. The responses increased from the isoluminance condition to
reach a peak at 50% contrast in the green side and 12.5% contrast in the red side of the tested range of
luminance contrasts. At 100% contrast, red-black darts evoked larger responses than green-black darts.
Multifocal VEP responses exhibited an asymmetric behavior when red-green dart stimulus moves from
the isoluminance condition towards a pure red or green luminance contrast. Supported by NIH-
MHIRT5737MD001378-08.

11:30
EFFECTS OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA ON PIG DERIVED ANNULUS FIBROSUS
CHONDROCYTE PROLIFERATION. Scott C. Berry*, and Richard Smith. Christian Brothers
University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee, and University of Tennessee, Campbell Clinic
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration generally begins with damage to the annulus fibrosus (AF). If the
damage can be easily treated, then it would be possible to stop the progression of IVD degeneration
before the nucleus pulposus (NP) begins to collapse. In this study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is tested as a
possible treatment for IVD degeneration as it pertains to damage of the AF. AF derived chondrocytes,
from the spine of a pig, were cultured with PRP and various platelet concentrations. RNA was extracted
and quantitative PCR was performed for the genes mmp-1, col-1, col-2, and aggrecan. The samples
treated with PRP showed an increase in expression of col-1 and col-2, and a decrease in expression of
mmp-1 and aggrecan. This shows that collagen breakdown is minimal and there is an increase in
chondrocyte proliferation compared to nontreated controls. These results demonstrate a potential of PRP
to promote AF chondrocyte proliferation.

11:45
DIRECT DELIVERY OF EPO IS NEUROPROTECTIVE TO PHOTORECEPTORS
INDEPENDENT OF GLYCOSYLATION. Ying Y. Wong*, Shayla Merry, Kishore Kodali, and Tonia S.
Rex,
Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, Tennessee (YYW), and Department
of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee (SM, KK, TSR
).
We sought to determine if direct delivery of erythropoietin (EPO) or its glycosylated variants,
deglycosylated EPO (DEPO) and hyperglycosylated EPO (HEPO) are able to protect the photoreceptors
of retinal degeneration slow (rds) mice from dying of apoptosis. On postnatal day 7 rds mice were given a
single subretinal injection of EPO, DEPO, HEPO, or phosphate buffered saline. Apoptotic cells were
detected by TdT-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) of retinas at postnatal day 20 (the peak of apoptotic
cell death). Hematocrit levels were measured by capillary centrifugation. We detected 36±3 TUNEL +
cells/mm retina in untreated rds mice. Buffer, EPO, HEPO, and DEPO treated retinas had 16±4, 2±1, 3±2,
and 7±1 TUNEL + cells/mm retina, respectively. There was no change in percent hematocrit. EPO is
neuroprotective to the photoreceptors in the rds mouse without a concomitant increase in hematocrit.
Alteration in glycosylation level of EPO has no statistically significant effect on this protection.
Supported by Department of Ophthalmology Fellowship, Hope for Vision Young Investigator Award, and
Roche Foundation for Anemia Research

Source: http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~aross/biodept/TAS2009/TAS_2009_Program.pdf

equievo.pl

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party

Erectile dysfunction clinic

Erectile Dysfunction Clinic Patient Information Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit What is erectile dysfunction? Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is the persistent inability to get or maintain an erection that is sufficient for successful sexual intercourse.