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Healthy Start EPIC Center Last Updated May, 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS EPIC CENTER BRANDING GUIDE USAGE Welcome to the Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide (Guide). This Guide will provide standards to maintain consistency when producing any Healthy Start (HS) materials. These standards will give a connected and unified feel to the Healthy Start EPIC Center identity through a common understanding of the defined look and personality. This HS style section is a set of standards for the writing and design of doc-uments and establishes and enforces definitions and style to improve communication.If you are interested in branding or co-branding any documents, please contact the style guide administrator.
HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE • This Guide has a style guide administrator, Buffi Dudley, Senior Graphic Designer. Ms. Dudley will oversee all design elements to promote consistency. • Contact information: bdudley@jsi.com, 603-573-3329 • Copies of this Guide will be distributed to Healthy Start Funders, Grantees and JSI staff and consultants, and posted to http://healthystartepic.org/ • The Guide will be updated regularly, and will include a "date last updated" on each version.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS LOGOS & TAGLINES HS TAGLINESOur full logos, below, use the EPIC tagline: Supporting communities to give every child a Healthy Start. This should be used whenever possible on documents.
The overall Healthy Start National Program tagline is: Building Program Capacity, Strengthening Local Health Systems, Mobilizing Communities. This is used on longer documents such as the Fact sheet Brochure, where it can be added separate of the logo.
HS LOGOS GENERAL USAGE Logos should be used only in the colors and size ratios provided, logos can be resized to fit HS documents, but must be proportional and not distorted in any way. HS PRIMARY LOGO WITH TAGLINE HS QI & CoINN LOGO WITH TAGLINE The primary logo, which includes the program name The blue logo is only to be used for Engaging and and tagline, should be used whenever possible. In the Expanding Healthy Start Grantee Leadership and QI interest of ensuring readability, the primary Healthy Institute (the Institute) and CoIIN documents. Again, Start EPIC logo should be used at a minimum height this logo should be used at a minimum height of 1.5 of 1.5 inches for readability. inches for readability. HS COLLECTIVE IMPACT LOGOS WITH TAGLINESThe green purple logos are only to be used for Collective Impact Projects. The logo should be used at a minimum height of 1.5 inches for readability. The others can be used at 1" or any size without the text Supporting communities to give every child a Healthy Start. Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS SECONDARY LOGOS When adequate space is not available for the primary logo, use of secondary logos is appropriate. The second-ary logo can also be used in addition to the primary on longer documents. If it is used as an accent logo, it may be scaled down to any size necessary. Use the secondary logo with the EPIC letters when possible. If the letters are not readable in a smaller version, use the plain butterfly logo.
The black and white logos are to be used only in instances when use of colored logos is not possible.
Collective Impact Only HS CO-BRANDINGHS logo should always be the same size or bigger than the largest co-branded logo.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide GENERAL REPORTS AND OTHER PRINTED DOCUMENTSHEADING Franklin Gothic Medium: 14pt or Higher ALL CAPS or Title Case. No italics and no underlining. Title case is Capitalizing nouns, pronouns, adjec-tives, verbs, adverbs, and subordinate conjunctions and keeping lowercase articles (a, an, the), coordinating conjunctions, and prepositions. Lowercase the "to" in an infinitive (I Want to Explain Something). If you are not sure, Use Full Caps or this handy online tool: http://titlecapitalization.com/ (use Chicago Manual of style check box)Headings should be used in one of the HS colors if the document is being shared online or printed in color. Do not use the aqua for text as it is too light (see following page for colors).
Franklin Gothic Book: at least two points smaller than heading and at least 1 point larger than body text.
All Caps or Title Case (see above). Sub-heading should be used in one of the HS colors if the document is being shared online or printed in color. It should coordinate with or be the same color as the heading. Again, do not use the HS Aqua color (see page 7), it is too light for text.
BODYBaskerville Old Face: Must be at least 11-12pt for printed materials. Leading 14-16 points in design pro-grams, line spacing 1.15-2pts in Word.
Sentence case only. Please do not underline or use all caps. Bold may be used for emphasis, Italics may be used for publications, etc. The number 5 looks tilted and can be fixed in most design programs. If you run into a problem, contact the design team or use Franklin Gothic Gook for numbers.
OTHER USAGEThe above are the ONLY fonts to be used. Sizes may be larger for posters, banners, signs, and any other collateral materials needed for the project. If a document will be shared mainly online, the body text may be changed to Franklin Gothic Book instead of Baskerville Old Face.
When using white text on a colored background, it is best to go with Franklin medium or gothic. Never use white text on a colored background with a point size under 12pt in a printed publication or under 26pt in a presentation.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS COLOR PALETTES CMYK 2/99/95/0 RGB 232/36/42 WEB SAFE E8232A CMYK 1/75/98/0 RGB 239/101/38 WEB SAFE EE6425 CMYK 82/7/96/0 RGB 19/166/78 WEB SAFE 12A64E HS AQUACMYK 70/14/0/0/ RGB 36/171/226 WEB SAFE 24ABE2 HS BLUECMYK 95/75/98/0/ RGB 23/85/165 WEB SAFE 1755A4 HS PURPLE CMYK 73/98/2/0 RGB 105/48/142 WEB SAFE 692F8E Colors are meant to be used at 100% shading . Exceptions can be made in shading tables that will have text in them.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS REQUIRED DOCUMENT LANGUAGE REQUIRED DISCLOSURE Include on all Healthy Start EPIC Center branded materialsPlace the following disclosure in its entirety at the bottom of last page of document.
The Healthy Start EPIC Center is operated by JSI, a public health management consulting and research orga-nization dedicated to improving the health of individuals and communities throughout the world. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Maternal and Child Health Bureau under grant number UF5MC268450103 in the amount of $2,077,544. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.
Note: Grant amount will change, this is through May 31, 2015.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide








MATERIALS & TEMPLATES AVAILABLE Fact Sheet Brochure HS Infographic in English and Spanish HS EPIC EPIC Services H In Communities with the Greatest Need Healthy Start works to improve maternal and perinatal Many things contribute to a healthy and safe pregnancy. If you are pregnant or health in communities with the greatest need. Healthy planning a family, Healthy Start can help you get the information and services you need to have a healthy baby, raise a healthy family, and keep yourself healthy Start communities have h infant mortality rates at least 1.5 times the national average, and high rates of low birth weight, preterm birth, and maternal mortality. Empowering Families, Strengthening Local Health Regular medical care prevents problems and keeps mothers and babies well. Healthy Start can help you sign up for health insurance and find a doctor for you
Healthy Start communities are among the nation's Systems, Mobilizing Communities… and your baby.
The Healthy Start EPIC Center provides assistance to support Healthy Start (HS) grantees in achieving program poorest with many young families struggling to meet goals. The Center helps to strengthen staff skills to implement evidence-based practices in maternal and child Mothers and babies do better when their families are supportive. Healthy Start involves
health, facilitates grantee-to-grantee sharing of expertise and lessons from the field, enables grantees to conduct fathers and supports new parents as you raise your young family.
Healthy Start funds 87 organizations in 33 states, ongoing evaluation of activities for effectiveness, and builds program capacity to work with community partners to improve health and social service systems for women, infants and families. including health departments, community-based organizations and universities. Twenty-two of these local Eating healthy food helps your baby to grow and develop. Healthy Start can connect you to nutrition counseling and food assistance.
SERVICES OFFERED BY THE HEALTHY START EPIC CENTER Healthy Start projects serve rural communities, four Training and technical assistance (TTA) provided by the HS EPIC Center are "data-driven", designed to address serve communities on the US-Mexico border and three specific needs and gaps identified by grantees and Project Officers, through needs assessments, performance serve a predominately Native American population.
Babies of women who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy are more likely to be born too soon or too small. If you smoke, Healthy Start can help you quit.
monitoring, and program evaluation. HS EPIC Center TTA activities include: Web-based Training: All HS grantee staff are invited to attend web-based trainings, which are also recorded and Babies of women who drink alcohol during pregnancy are more likely to have physical and learning problems as they grow up. Healthy Start provides
posted to www.healthystartepic.org for viewing at a later time.
The New Healthy Start Community
education and counseling about alcohol and drug use during pregnancy.
September 1, 2014
• Hear from Your Peers Webinars showcase Healthy Start programs in action. Healthy Start grantee(s) present on a specific topic, sharing implementation strategies, challenges overcome and lessons learned WASHINGTON
Families need a safe, stable place to live. in delivering HS services in their local area. NORTH DAKOTA
MINNESOTA
can connect you to housing assistance if you need it.
WISCONSIN
SOUTH DAKOTA
• Discussion Groups give grantees the opportunity for a more in-depth exchange about topics presented MICHIGAN
NEBRASKA
during Hear from Your Peers webinars. This series of up to three one-hour discussions utilizes a web Mothers and children thrive in communities with good schools, parks and ILLINOIS
COLORADO
health care. Healthy Start brings local agencies and businesses together to
meeting platform to bring up to 20 grantees together to share elements for success and implementation VIRGINIA
MISSOURI
serve residents better and make communities safer.
CALIFORNIA
KENTUCKY
NO. CAROLINA
challenges with each other, and feed their findings to the HS CoIIN. The CoIIN in turn will review, TENNESSEE
OKLAHOMA
ARKANSAS
NEW MEXICO
CAROLINA
distill and integrate these findings to make recommendations for standards of practice for HS programs.
To improve maternal and child health HEALTHY START offers services and support for mothers, children outcomes in communities nationwide • Ask the Expert Webinars are 60 minute sessions in which an expert presents on a topic of interest, and their families before, during and after pregnancy.
providing a brief (15-30 minute) overview followed by 30-45 minute Q&A period. 7 Grants end January 31, 2015
• Family planning • Prenatal care • Newborn screening Technical Assistance (TA): TA provides for in-depth assistance to an individual grantee or group of grantees that Level 3 (15 grants in 12 states)
• Nutrition counseling • Postpartum care Level 2 (18 grants in 15 states)
• Screening for chronic is tailored to their unique needs, contexts, and environments. Level 1 (54 grants in 30 states)
diseases like diabetes and • Childbirth education • Breastfeeding support high blood pressure • Health education • Depression screening • Well-woman care Healthy Start Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (HS CoIIN): The HS CoIIN is a partner- • Smoking cessation • Family planning • Insurance enrollment ship of Healthy Start grantees dedicated to strengthening Healthy Start services and systems, to advance program • Partner involvement • Well-baby care and vaccinations• Parenting support goals to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. Through a structured process of collaborative learning, To see where Healthy Start is making a difference around the Healthy Start EPIC TA Center • Home visits by a health worker the HS CoIIN seeks to identify and promote implementation of standardized evidence-based and field-tested ap- with you, your baby and your country, click on the map with links to the funded organizations • Information you can use to take care of yourself and your baby proaches to essential HS components such as perinatal risk assessment, case management, participant engagement • In-person support to help you get care and services and empowerment, and fostering Collective Impact and local systems integration through Community Action Networks • Health care providers working together to make services work better Healthy Start is an initiative of the Maternal and Child Health Program (MCHB), • Staff who know your community, speak your language and respect you Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), US Dept of Health and Human Services (HHS).
This document was developed by the Healthy Start EPIC Center operated by John Snow, Inc.,and was funded under the Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau grant #UF5MC268450103.
CoIIN One-pager HS EPIC TA Provider Orientation HS EPIC Training FAQs EPIC Training FAQs Healthy Start Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (HS CoIIN) EPIC TA Provider Orientation Packet The Healthy Start CoIIN is a partnership of Healthy Start grantees dedicated to strengthening Healthy Start services and systems, in order to advance program Healthy Start EPIC Center Healthy Start FAQ: Gateway to Tools and Training: goals to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. The HS CoIIN functions as an Advisory Council to the Division of Healthy Start and Perinatal Technical Assistance Provider Orientation Packet The Healthy Start EPIC Center Website are HS grantees: Services (DHSPS) and the HS EPIC Center, the training and technical assistance provider for the program. The Healthy Start EPIC Center is pleased to offer no-cost technical assistance (TA) to grantees with the On Thursday, January 29th the EPIC Center hosted a webinar about the new EPIC Center Website, Healthy Start, Inc. HS CoIIN Goals and Objectives goal of increasing their effectiveness in achieving program goals of reducing infant mortality and disparities, covering website content, navigation, and registration. During the webinar, grantees asked many great and and improving maternal outcomes. Thank you for your participation in this project as a TA provider. important questions. We took those questions and have summarized some of the key areas of interest: Through a structured process of collaborative learning, the HS CoI N seeks to Birmingham Healthy identify and promote implementation of standardized evidence-based and field- Start Plus, Inc. This orientation packet is intended to guide you through the TA process: from contract set-up, to TA Website Registration: Come one, come al ! tested approaches to essential HS components such as perinatal risk provision and reporting, to reimbursement. If you have any questions about the Healthy Start EPIC assessment, care coordination and case management, participant engagement Is there a limit to how many people from a project can register on the website? Start Initiative and empowerment, and fostering Collective Impact and local systems integration Center TA process, please don't hesitate to e-mail Katie Robert, at healthystartepic@jsi.com, or by calling through Community Action Networks (CAN). The specific objectives of the HS There is no limit! Different project members have different needs, and we want to be sure that everybody has the opportunity to ask their own questions and get the answers they need the most. Subcontract Set-up  Identify capacity building priorities and expert resources to build the capabilities Healthy Start of Registration is not limited to Project Directors. Anybody on the project who could benefit from of all 101 grantees Initiating a TA assignment requires coordinated discussions between the Healthy Start EPIC Center TA team, the grantee, the grantee's project officer, and the TA provider. Once the TA request has been connecting to other Healthy Start programs is welcome and encouraged to register via the "Connect"  Promote communication among/between grantees, DHSPS and HS EPIC Center section of the website. PDPH Healthy Start clarified and approved by the PO, the Healthy Start EPIC Center TA team will work with the TA to ensure all grantees have a voice in setting the direction for HS provider to formalize a contractual agreement to provide services. How do we sign up for the e-newsletter?  Brainstorm and test opportunities to strengthen the program especially related to standardizing components of the HS model 1. Subcontract Agreement Please email healthystartepic@jsi.com with a request to be added to the recipient list. We will be sure to  Disseminate lessons learned to the HS community • Your TA assignment is allotted up to 2.5 consultant days at the GSA-approved $600/day rate (up Healthy Start Initiative to $1,500 total). Travel and additional time must be preapproved by the Healthy Start EPIC TA Promote HS as an effective and vital community based resource in all DC Healthy Start If a correction is needed to the website, who should be contacted? communities to ensure the long-term success of HS. Healthy Start Brooklyn • JSI must receive an original, completed, signed copy of the standard subcontract agreement. Collaborative Learning: From HS Grantees to the HS CoIIN and Back Great question! Please send an email to healthystartepic@jsi.com or use the "contact us" feature available Healthy Start, Inc. on the website to alert us to necessary changes. The HS CoIIN will articulate best practices and quality improvement guidance based on state-of-science and rooted First time JSI (Healthy Start EPIC's home organization) vendors must also submit a vendor profile in grantee experience serving HS participants. Through a series of ongoing form and W-9. Attached. discussion forums on priority topics HS grantees across the country will share What is the CBA worksheet and how do we get a copy? elements for success and implementation challenges with each other, and 2. Technical Assistance Work Plan Background and AIM feed their findings to the HS CoIIN. The CoIIN in turn will review, distill and The Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) worksheets provide a framework for you to self-assess the degree The TA Work Plan Background and AIM statements must be completed to execute the integrate these findings to make recommendations for standards of practice for to which your program aligns with program expectations. Grantees attending the National Convention in subcontract agreement. (Multiple TA requests may not be combined in single TA Work Plans.) HS programs. Once approved by DHSPS, these recommendations NC Baby Love Plus November completed the worksheets in the breakout sessions. You were emailed a copy of your will be disseminated by the HS CoIIN to all HS grantees. The Work Plan Background (a description of the issue/situation that prompts the TA request) is completed worksheets in January. These completed worksheets guide decisions around identifying Northwest Indiana completed after an initial call between the Healthy Start EPIC Center TA Coordinator and priority TA needs. If you do not have a copy of your completed worksheets, you can contact Operating Structure of the HS CoIIN grantee, and the AIM is completed by the TA Provider after their initial call with the grantee. See healthystartepic@jsi.com to request a copy. attached SAMPLE Completed TA Work Plan. The HS CoIIN meets monthly, including day-long face-to-face sessions 2-3 times per year, with conference calls in the interim. Two CoI N members serve as Co- A blank, full set of CBA worksheet questions is also available under the November convention tab on the Chairs, for rotating six-month terms. The HS EPIC Center provides support to plan TA Provision Guidance and Reporting website (HS EPIC Fall Convention). California Border and facilitate meetings, identify issues and information needs, and communicate The Healthy Start EPIC Center generally expects TA activities are completed within 30 days of the initial findings to the larger HS grantee community. phone call between the TA provider and grantee, with an additional 15 days to complete the reporting Can answers be changed on the CBA worksheet? Central Hillsborough Relationship of the HS CoIIN to the Infant Mortality CoIIN process (see Step 3). Some general guidance and required items include: Yes - the worksheets are intended to be for the grantees' benefit. You may update your self-assessment at While both CoIINs are concerned with reducing infant mortality, the HS CoIIN is • TA Providers are responsible for developing a scope of work (in collaboration with the grantee) any time. You can discuss any revisions to your self-assessment with your PO. Please note that all focused specifically on enhancing the Healthy Start program and developing grantees will be asked to update their self-assessment annually. Start Initiative Healthy Start standards of practice. The HS CoIIN will maintain ongoing which best addresses the needs of the grantee, and fits within the pre-approved 2.5 days for the TA communication and information exchange with the Infant Mortality CoIIN as Camden Healthy Start well as with the Home Visiting CoIIN to ensure that relevant lessons learned are reflected in Healthy Start practice. EPIC Training FAQs: Gateway to Tools and Training: The Healthy Start EPIC Center Website For more information on the HS CoIIN please contact the HS EPIC Center: healthystartepic@jsi.com or go to healthystartepic.org. EPIC TA Provider Orientation Packet Basic Word Templates for EPIC, CoIIN and Collective Impact Save the Date Publisher Template EPIC Word Template CoIIN Word Template Collective Impact Word Template Normal Body Text Normal Body Text Normal Body Text Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) NAME OF MEETING OR EVENT HERE Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) DATE OF MEETING AND TIMES Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) EXPLANATION ABOUT EVENT GOES HERE….Please join the Health Resources and Services Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), Healthy Start Initiative on Tuesday, September 23, 2014 from 1:00-2:15 PM Eastern, for an introductory webinar on Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) the Healthy Start Initiative: Eliminating Disparities in Perinatal Health 2014 Grant Program. Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) This orientation webinar will introduce new grantees to the MCHB Healthy Start Initiative Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) Bold Body Text (Question) staff; provide an overview of the Healthy Start program; describe available technical Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) Normal Body Text (Answer) assistance resources; and share upcoming technical assistance opportunities. Al 2015 Healthy Start grantees are expected to attend. tiTitle goes hear in foorter tiTitle goes hear in foorter tiTitle goes hear in foorter HS EPIC Template HS CoIIN Template Collective Impact Template Subtitle and/or Date Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding Style Guide APPROVED EPIC PHOTOS All Healthy Start EPIC Center documents that use photos must use our approved photos, or get approval be-fore using new ones. Photos must reflect a diverse population of young women, infants and famiies. Whenever possible, we use them in the Health start icon as shown directly below: Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide More photos will be added as they are needed and as they are approved for use. If you hae photos that you would like to use or ned other photos approved, please contact Buffi Dudley.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide This HS Style Guide is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents and establishes and enforces style to improve communication.
LIST OF ACRONYMSE (of EPIC): Evaluate need and impactP (of EPIC): Partner for Collective ImpactI (of EPIC): Implement evidence-based practicesC (of EPIC): Consider the participant's context.
4Ps: The four phases of the perinatal period=Pre-/Interconception, Prenatal, Postpartum, ParentingCAN: Community Action NetworkCBA: Capacity building assistanceCI: Collective impactCI-PLN: Collective Impact Peer Learning NetworksHS: Healthy StartHealthy Start CoIIN or HS CoIIN: Healthy Start Collaborative Innovation and Improvement NetworkL1: Level 1 granteeL2: Level 2 granteeL3: Level 3 granteeMCH: Maternal and child healthPO or HS PO: Project Officer or Healthy Start Project OfficerTA: Technical assistanceT/TA: Training and technical assistance Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide THE RIGHT WORDHealthy Start participant. NOT client.
Healthy Start EPIC Center or HS EPIC Center. NOT EPIC Center.
Healthy Start Annual Convention. NOT Conference.
HS EPIC Center website or healthystartepic.org. NOT EPIC Center website or EPIC website.
Additional guidance from JSI on common word spellings, hyphenation, etc., can be found are below:A-acknowledgmentacquired immunodeficiency syndrome (also seen as: acquired AIDS/Immune deficiency syndrome)advisoragreed on (v., as in they agreed on the policy)agreed-on (adj., as in agreed-on policy)agreed-toagreed-upon (n, um)AIDSTAR-Oneair freightairtimea.m. (time)Anopheles mosquito (malaria)antenatalantibodyantigenantimalarialantimalarial drugsantiretroviralantiretroviral drugsantiretroviral treatment (ART)anti-tuberculosisanytime adv. (but at any time)anywhereappendicesArabic (numerals)autodisableawareness raising (avoid) Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide B-B.A. (Bachelor of Arts, not B.A degree)bachelor's degreeback endback orderback up (v) but backup (adj, n)bar code (bar coding)baselinebed netbeforehandbenchmarkbenefitedbiannualbilateralBill & Melinda Gates Foundation (use ampersand, not "and")bimonthlybiohazardbirth ratebirth spacingbirthweightblood-bornebookkeeperbrand-newbrand name (n.)brand-name (adj., as in brand-name product)breakdownbreastfeedingbroken down (divided preferred)B.S. (Bachelor of Science,not B.S. degree)Bureau for Global Health (GH)burnout Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide C-caesareancanceledcare seekingcaregivercaretakercaseloadcash-and-carrycatch all (adj), but catchall (noun)CD4 cellcellphoneCenters for Disease Control andPrevention (U.S. CDC)Central Medical Store (proper n)central medical stores (generic)chairpersonchecklistcheckupchild spacingchildbirthchildrearingChlamydiaclassroomclean up (v), but cleanup (adj, n)close out (v), but closeout (adj, n)coauthorcold boxcold chaincommunity-based distributioncommunity-based organization (CBO)condomsconsensus buildingcoordinateco-payment Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide cosponsorcost recoverycost effective (n)cost-effective (adj)cost-effectivenesscost-sharing (adj)cost sharing (n)counselingcountrywidecouple-years of protection (CYP) (singular and plural)course workco-workerscrises (plural)criteria (plural)cross section (n)crosscheckcross-cutting (adj, n)cross-subsidizationcross-tabulationCryptococcal meningitiscustoms (n)cut and paste (v)cutoffcycle-timeD-data (plural)database (databased)data-entrydata-processingdatasetday-to-dayde factodecisionmakerdecisionmaking Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide decision-making (process)dejuredemographicdemurrage Depo-Provera® (first use in a chapter)desktopdirectly observed treatment (short-course) (DOTS)dispensed to user (but dispensed-to-user data)dockworkerdouble-check (v)double countdownstreamdowntimedrop-offdropout (n)drug sellersduty freeE-earmarkeffectivelye.g., (for example)emailempty-handeden routeend userend-of-yeareuro (European currency)ever-married womenevery timeexpiryextramaritalF-facility-in-chargefactsheetfaith-based organization (FBO) Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide feedbackfee-for-servicefield testfield workfine-tune fingerstickfirst aidfirsthand (adj)first-out (adj)first-to-experiencefiscal yearfive years oldfive-year projectfive-year-old (child)fixed dose (drugs)fixed dose combinationfixed priceflowchartfluorescentfollow up (verb)follow-on (n; adj)follow-up (adj)forecastforkliftfor profitframeworkFrancophone (countries)free of chargefrontline (adj, n)fuel supplyfulfillfull-length (adj)full-scale implementationfull-time (adj)fundraising Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide G-Ghanian (residents of Ghana)Gram staingrantmakergrantseekergrass rootsguessworkH-half-hourhalfwayhandheldhandoverhandwashinghard-to-reachhealth care (adj, n)hepatitis BHib vaccinehigh income, but high-income familyhigh-level officialhigh-risk behaviorHIV-1HIV-2HIV & AIDS or HIV and AIDS (not HIV/AIDS)HIV-exposedHIV incidenceHIV-infectedHIV medicationsHIV-negative (adj)HIV-positive (adj)HIV prevalenceHIV preventionhome-based carehost-country (adj)household survey Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide human immunodeficiency virus (HIVI- i.e., (that is)immunodeficiencyinboundin-chargein-countryin-houseinpatientInternet interrelatedintersectoralin-textintrauterineintrauterine device (IUD)intravenous drug user (IDU)issue voucherissues dataJ-judgmentK-Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS)kick-off (n), but kick off (v)L-laptoplarge-scalelayout (v)lead time (n), but lead-time (adj)life savinglifecyclelife-or-deathlife-saving skillsline itemlistserveLo-Femenallog in (v) Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide log-on (n)long term (n)long-term (adj)low-income (adj)low-paritylow level (n)low-level position (adj)M-macro-level (adj)mark up (v), but markup (n, adj)master's degree maternal and child health (MCH)maximum stock levelmax-minmen who have sex with men (MSM)method-specificmicrobicidesmicro-managementmidpointmidtermmilestonemilligram (mg)minimum stock levelMinistry of Health (MOH not MoH)mini-surveymission (generic)mockupmonthly cycle (mc)months of supplymop up (v)morphine sulfatemother-to-child transmission (MTCT)motorcycleMPH (Master of Public Health) Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide P-p.m. (time)paperworkpart-timepeople living with HIV (PLHIV)per diemperi-urbanperformance-basedphaseout (n), phase out (v)pickup (n)pilot test (v)policy levelpolicymaker, policymakingpostabortionpostpartumpremaritalprenatalprepayment prequalifypreservicepreshipmentprevention of mother-to-childtransmission (PMTCT)private sectorproblem solvingprogram-relatedprogram-wide (adj)proratedpublic sectorpull-down, and pull-down menupurpose-builtpush-pullQ-quality-tester (n)quasi-government Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide R-real-lifereal-timerecordkeepingreengineeringre-establishregional-levelreloadreorderrequisitionresponse to HIV and AIDS (not "fight" or "war" against)retestingretrovirusrisk-takingrole-playroll-out (n), roll out (v)roll-out plan (adj) rule of thumbS-safeguardsafer sex (preferred over safe sex)scale up (v), scale-up (n, adj)scaling upsecond line (drugs)sector wideself-assessmentself-imagesemi-annual reportSemi-Annual Report (proper noun)semi-averagesseroconversionseronegativeseropositiveseroprevalenceserostatus Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide service deliveryservice delivery levelservice statistics data-based forecastssetbackset-up (n), set up (v)Seventh-Day Adventistsex workersexually transmitted infection(STI not STD)sharps containershelf life (n)short course (n)short-termside effectsingle-dosesingle-usesocioeconomicsole sourceSoutheast Asiaspreadsheet stakeholderstand-alonestart-up (n, adj), start up (v)state-of-the-artsteppingstonestock-on-handstockcardstockkeepingstock-keeping unitstock out (v)stockout (a, n)stocktakingstore keeping (v), but storekeeper (n)storeroom Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide stopgapstraight line (n)straight-line (adj)streamlinesubcontractsubdistrictsubgranteesubnationalsubprojectssubregionsub-Saharan (Africa)subzonalsupply chain (adj, n)supply-side barrierssystem wide (n)system-wide (adj)T-TajikistantakeoverT cellT-cell countteam buildingteamwork third partythird persontie-breakingtime-consumingtime frametimelinetimelinesstoolkittransition (v) [avoid]troubleshootturnovertwo-fold benefit Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start Regions Covered Kimberly Sherman CO, MN, NV, OR, SD, WI Angela Hayes Tolliver Johannie Escarne IA, KS, MO, NE, OK Juliann DeStefano NC, SC, TN, VA, WV, KY Keisher Highsmith Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS EPIC CENTER TERMS:Ask the Expert webinar: Ask the Expert is a one‐hour conference call/Webex where the expert (external consultant) provides a brief 15‐minute overview of a topic and HS grantees come prepared for an active 45‐minute question and answer period. HS grantees learn from the expert as well as from the discussion with their peers.
Healthy Start EPIC Center: The Healthy Start (HS) EPIC Center provides assistance to support HS grantees in achieving program goals. The HS EPIC Center helps to strengthen staff skills to implement evidence-based practices in maternal and child health, facilitates grantee-to-grantee sharing of expertise and lessons from the field, enables HS Grantees to conduct ongoing evaluation of activities for effectiveness, and builds program capacity to work with com-munity partners to improve health and social service systems for women, infants and families. The HS EPIC Center is a training and technical assistance initiative operated by John Snow, Inc., and funded by HRSA.
Hear from Your Peers webinar: A 90-minute webinar in which a HS grantee or grantees who have been successful and effective in a particular topic area such as recruitment and retention or father involvement, share their experienc-es, strategies, challenges and factors contributing to success and answer questions posed by other grantees.
HS Discussion Groups: These grantee-grantee sharing forums co‐facilitated by a HS grantee and HS EPIC Center staff, are conducted via conference call/Webex, and may be taped for rebroadcast. Following a standardized struc-ture, Discussion Groups provide a vehicle for one or more grantees to share how they address a particular imple-mentation issue followed by an opportunity for participants to discuss challenges and lessons learned related to the topic. All Discussion Groups will be summarized in writing and include consensus regarding best practices, available tools and grantee resources/contacts for future reference.
Healthy Start Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (HS CoIIN): The HS CoIIN is a partnership of Level 3 grantees dedicated to strengthening existing Healthy Start services and systems, as well as to developing innovative new approaches, in order to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. Participants learn from one another and national experts, share best practices and lessons learned, and track progress toward shared bench-marks. The CoIIN is designed to facilitate collaborative learning around mutually identified problems, and to pro-mote dissemination and adoption of proven quality improvement principles and practices among all Healthy Start grantees. The HS CoIIN also functions as an advisory council to the Division of Healthy Start and Perinatal Services (DHSPS) and the HS EPIC Center, the training and technical assistance provider for Healthy Start.
Mentoring: Peer Mentoring is a form of technical assistance that pairs a grantee needing longer term and regular support with an experienced grantee.
Technical Assistance: Training and TA are mutually reinforcing capacity building activities that are timely and rele-vant. Training builds individual core competencies and organizational capacities to increase reach and effectiveness of Healthy Start programs. Training and TA are "data-driven" and designed to address specific needs and gaps iden-tified by grantees, Project Officers, needs assessments, performance monitoring, and program evaluation.
Training: Training and TA are mutually reinforcing capacity building activities that are timely and relevant. TA pro-vides in-depth assistance to an individual grantee or group of grantees that is tailored to their unique needs, contexts, and environments. Training and TA are "data-driven" and designed to address specific needs and gaps identified by grantees, Project Officers, needs assessments, performance monitoring, and program evaluation.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HEALTHY START TERMSMany of the terms listed below were taken from the glossary of terms, Funding Opportunity Announcement, Healthy Start Initiative: Eliminating Disparities in Perinatal Health, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Health Resources and Services Administration, 2014.
Accessible Services: The primary care medical home delivers accessible services with shorter waiting times for urgent needs, enhanced in-person hours, around-the-clock telephone or electronic access to a member of the care team, and alternative methods of communication such as email and telephone care. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE): Exposure to abuse, neglect, violence, and other stressors. Aim Statement: A written, measurable, and time-sensitive description of the accomplishments the team expects to make from its improvement efforts. This statement answers the question: "What are we trying to achieve?" Annual Performance Indicator: For each Healthy Start performance measure, the percentage or rate resulting from dividing the numerator by the denominator as specifically defined in the measure. This indicator should show how the project is progressing towards achieving one of their Project Period objectives. Below 100 Percent of the Federal Poverty Level: Annual income for the client's family, compared to the Fed-eral Poverty Level. Record at enrollment as Percentage of level for a family of the same size. Annual income data can be estimated from monthly data, if necessary (Monthly income x 12). HS grantees may wish to record information on income and family size and calculate poverty levels separately, or enter only the computed pov-erty level for the client. The Federal poverty level is updated annually in February and published in the Federal Register. Benchmarks: A means of assessing progress on a select group of outcomes and activities which are common to all Healthy Start projects.
Border Project Area: Border communities are those communities located within 62 miles/100 kilometers of the U.S./Mexico border. In order to be considered for Border Community funding, the project area and the target population to be served both have to reside within 62 miles/100 kilometers of the U.S./Mexico border. Budget Period: The interval of time (usually 12 months) into which the project period is divided for budgetary and funding purposes. For the purposes of this FOA, the initial Budget Period is September 1 – May 31 and the remaining budget periods are June 1 – May 31. CAN Training (Number of Individual Members Trained): Number of individual consortium members participating in formalized Healthy Start funded consortium training.
Capacity: Program capacity includes delivery systems, workforce, policies, and support systems (e.g., training, research, technical assistance, and information systems) and other infrastructure needed to maintain service de-livery and policy making activities. Program capacity measures the strength of the human and material resourc-es necessary to meet public health obligations. As program capacity sets the stage for other activities, program capacity results are closely related to the results for process, health outcomes, and risk factors. Program capaci-ty results should answer the question, "What does the Project Area need to achieve the desired results?" Case Management Services: Provision of services in a coordinated, culturally competent approach through cli-ent assessment, referral, monitoring, facilitation, and follow-up on utilization of needed services. Case manage-ment is also known as care coordination. For pregnant women, these services include those that assure access and utilization of quality prenatal care, delivery, and postpartum care. For infants up to two years of age, these services assure access and utilization of appropriate quality preventive and primary care services.
Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Childbirth Education (Number of Participants Who Received): Number of participants who received child-birth information per a pre-designed schedule/curriculum as an ongoing part of their prenatal care or participated in a formal Childbirth Education program. Childbirth education information may have been provided in classes, support groups, or in one-on-one sessions. Information may have been offered either directly or through an outside referral source. Client Satisfaction: The number of unduplicated MCHB supported projects that report being satisfied with the responsiveness of services provided to them by MCHB in a determined time period as measured by customer satisfaction surveys. Collective Impact (http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact):The result of having organizations from different sectors agree to solve a specific social problem using a common agenda, aligning their efforts, and using common measures of success. The five conditions for collective impact are: 1) a common agenda, 2) shared measurement system, 3) mutually reinforcing activities, 4) continuous communication, and 5) backbone organization support. Completed Service Referral: A referral is considered completed, when the client received the services from provider(s) to whom she was referred either within or outside of the MCHB program/agency. The purpose of these referrals can be either treatment-related or preventive. Comprehensive System of Women's Health Care: A system that provides a full array of health services utilizing linkages to all programs serving women. The system must address gaps/barriers in service provision. Services pro-vided must be appropriate to women's age and risk status, emphasizing preventive health care. It must include the full biological life cycle of the woman and concomitant physical, mental, and emotional changes that occur.
Community Action Network (CAN): An existing, formally organized partnership, advisory board or coalition of organizations and individuals representing consumers, appropriate agencies at the State, Tribal, county, city government levels, public and private providers, churches, local civic/community action groups, and local businesses which identify themselves with the project's target project area, and who unite in an effort to collec-tively apply their resources to the implementation of one or more common strategies for the achievement of a common goal within that project area. The CAN must have current approved by-laws, which include policies regarding conflict of interest, to serve the needs as identified by its mission and/or functional statement. If the project area lies either in a federally designated Empowerment Zone/Enterprise Community, at least one mem-ber of that collaborative should also be on the Healthy Start Consortium. Community Participant: is an individual who attends a Healthy Start sponsored event or participates in consor-tium activities, etc. Comprehensive Care: The primary care medical home is accountable for meeting the large majority of each pa-tient's physical and mental health care needs, including prevention and wellness, acute care, and chronic care. Providing comprehensive care requires a team of care providers.
Coordinated Care: The primary care medical home coordinates care across all elements of the broader health care system, including specialty care, hospitals, home health care, and community services and supports. Contractor: An entity/individual with whom the grantee organization enters a binding agreement to perform one or more of the proposed services for the project according to the proposed plan, and fiscal and data reporting requirements established (and monitored) by the grantee organization. The scope of one contractors proposed services cannot constitute the bulk of services for the proposed Healthy Start project; such sub-granting is not allowed under HRSA. Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Cultural Competence: A set of values, behaviors, attitudes, and practices within a system, organization, program or among individuals which enables them to work effective cross culturally. Further, it refers to the ability to honor and respect the beliefs, language, interpersonal styles, and behaviors of individuals and families receiving services, as well as staff who are providing such services. Cultural competence is a dynamic, ongoing, develop-mental process that requires a long-term commitment and is achieved over time. Denominator: the denominator represents the number of persons who were at risk of, or eligible for, the nu-merator event (the opportunity to deliver the desired action) during a defined time period.
Direct Health Care Services: Those services generally delivered one-on-one between a health professional and a patient in an office, clinic or emergency room which may include primary care physicians, registered dietitians, public health or visiting nurses, nurses certified for obstetric and pediatric primary care, medical social workers, nutritionists, dentists, sub-specialty physicians who serve children with special health care needs, audiologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language therapists, or specialty registered dietitians. Basic services include what most consider ordinary medical care; inpatient and outpatient medical services, allied health services, drugs, laboratory testing, x-ray services, dental care, and pharmaceutical products and services. Family-Centered Care: A system or philosophy of care that incorporates the family as an integral component of the health care system.HRSA-14-121, HRSA-14-120, HRSA-14-122 58 Family Planning: Number of participants receiving individualized family planning counseling and/or services with a medical provider or other health provider. The primary purpose is to provide services related to contra-ception, infertility, or sterilization.
Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA): Federal legislation enacted in 1993 that requires Federal agencies to develop strategic plans, prepare annual plans setting performance objectives, and report annually on actual performance. Health Inequities: Health inequalities can be defined as differences in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups. Health inequities are caused by the uneven distribu-tion of social determinants of health. Social determinants include education, housing, and the neighborhood environment (e.g., sidewalks, parks), access to transportation, employment opportunities, the law and the justice systems, and health care and public health systems.
Hispanic: Persons of any race who report/identify themselves as Mexican-American, Chicano, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American (Spanish countries) or other Hispanic origin. HIV/AIDS Education Only (Number of Participants Who Received): Number of participants who have received individual and/or group education on HIV/AIDS without lab testing. This includes teaching clients on how to get tested, but where the testing was not included in the Healthy Start service. HIV/AIDS Counseling and Treatment (Number of Participants Served): Number of participants who have received Healthy Start funded individual and/or group counseling which includes (blood) testing, and/or treatment services related to HIV/AIDS, including psycho-social, care giver support, other medical and/or support activities. Housing Assistance Referrals (Number of Participants Referred): Number of Healthy Start participants who have received assistance and/or a referral pertaining to locating, repairing, or paying for permanent or temporary housing. Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Hypertension: Under new, stricter national blood pressure guidelines issued in May 2003, a resting blood pres-sure reading below 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) is normal. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is defined as a resting blood pressure consistently at 140/90 mm Hg or higher. (Mayo Clinic, 2003) Immunizations: Number of age-appropriate immunizations provided (e.g., MMR, OPV, DPT, H. Influenza, and Hepatitis B) according to AAP/PCIP established standards) during Healthy Start funded activities/services. Infant Mortality Rate: The number of deaths to infants from birth through 364 days of age. This measure is reported per 1,000 live births. Infrastructure Building Services: The base of the MCH pyramid of health services and form its foundation. They are activities directed at improving and maintaining the health status of all women and children by provid-ing support for development and maintenance of comprehensive health services systems and resources includ-ing development and maintenance of health services standards/guidelines, training, data and planning systems. Examples include needs assessment, evaluation, planning, policy development, coordination, quality assurance, standards development, monitoring, training, applied research, information systems and systems of care. In the development of systems of care it should be assured that the systems are family centered, community based and culturally competent. Intimate Partner/ Domestic Violence (Number of Participants Served): Number of participants who have re-ceived Healthy Start services directed at the prevention or treatment/reduction of domestic violence. This may include formal presentations, support groups, or one-on-one counseling sessions related to domestic violence.
Jobs/Jobs Training (Total Participants Served): Number of Healthy Start participants who have attended pro-grams designed to assist participants in improving, in obtaining and maintaining employment or furthering their formal education including job skills classes, training programs in specific skills, academic mentoring/tutoring programs, GED training, literacy, and English as a Second Language. Ladder of Opportunity: The process of social advancement or the elevation to higher social classes (low, mid-dle classes etc) through investments such as increased access to high-quality early childhood education and strengthening families by supporting the role of fathers. Lifecourse Theory: A multidisciplinary paradigm for conceptualizing health care needs and services that evolved from research documenting the important role early life events play in shaping an individual's health trajecto-ry. The interplay of risk and protective factors, such as socioeconomic status, toxic environmental exposures, health behaviors, stress, and nutrition, influence health throughout one's lifetime. Low Birthweight: The number of live births less than 2,500 grams. This measure is usually reported as a per-centage of total live births. Male Support Services (Total Males Served): Number of men who have attended or been involved in the Healthy Start funded fatherhood or male support group activities. Medical Home (AHRQ): The medical home encompasses five functions and attributes: Mental Health Services (Number of Participants Served): Number of participants in Healthy Start funded men-tal health activities (i.e., support groups, individual, and group therapy). Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Mental Health Services (Number of Participants Referred): Number of Healthy Start participants referred for residential or outpatient mental health services. Moderate Low Birth Weight: Live births with birth weight greater than or equal to 1500 and less than 2,500 grams (i.e., 1500-2499 grams). This measure is usually reported as a percentage of the total number of live births.
Needs Assessment: A study undertaken to determine the service requirements within a jurisdiction. For ma-ternal and child health purposes, the study is aimed at determining: 1) what are prevalent and otherwise unmet needs of the target population; 2) what is essential in terms of the provision of health services to address those prevalent or unmet needs; 3) what is available; and, 4) what is missing. Neonatal Mortality: Number of deaths reported by vital records, program records, care giver from birth to 28 days. Numerator: the numerator represents the number of persons in the denominator who received the defined treatment or intervention. Objectives: Descriptions of what is to be achieved in measurable, time framed terms. Based upon a performance indicator, objective statements clearly describe what is to be achieved, when it is to be achieved, the extent of achievement, and target population. Each objective should include a numerator, a denominator, time frame, and a baseline with data source including year. Projects are expected to monitor their progress in accomplishing their approved project period objectives through the measurement of their budget period objectives. Outcome: The effect the process has had on the people targeted by it. These might include, for example, changes in their self-perceived health status or changes in the distribution of health determinants, or factors which are known to affect their health, well-being and quality of life.
Parenting Education (Number of Participants Who Received): Number of participants who attended classes, support groups, or one-on-one education sessions which were provided to parents about infant/child care and development. To qualify as parenting education, these sessions need to be on-going (not sporadic) and have objectives. Parenting tips provided during routine baby exams and sick child care to trips to the emergency room do not constitute parenting education. Partnership: A group of people or organizations brought together with a common purpose or undertaking. Patient-Centered: The primary care medical home provides primary health care that is relationship-based with an orientation toward the whole person. Partnering with patients and their families requires understanding and respecting each patient's unique needs, culture, values, and preferences. Perinatal Period: The period occurring from preconception through the first year of life (for the infant and its family). Perinatal System of Care: A component of a community's overall primary health care system which connects and offers a linked array of medical and other services to address the comprehensive needs of women and their families throughout the childbearing process (including counseling and services related to: prenatal, deliv-ery, and postpartum periods, newborn/well baby care through the infant's first year of life, and, interconception care including family planning). Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Performance Indicator: A measurable variable developed by the grantee to measure the result or the impact which the model is having on the target population. Example: Number of pregnant participants who report decreased smoking at a given time over the total number of pregnant participants who report that they smoke during their initial assessment.
Performance Measure: A narrative statement that describes a specific maternal and child health need, or re-quirement, that when successfully addressed, will lead to, or will assist in leading to, a specific health outcome within a community or project area and generally within a specific time frame. (Example: The rate of women in [Target Area] who received early prenatal care in 2002.) Performance Objective: A statement of intention against which actual achievement and results can be mea-sured and compared. Performance objective statements clearly describe what is to be achieved, when it is to be achieved, and the extent of the achievement, and target populations. Place-based Initiative: A concept for communities to build capacity through knowledge, skills, relationships, interactions and organizational resources that enable residents, civic leaders, the public and private sectors and local organizations to transform neighborhoods into places of opportunity. Four developmental milestones common to most placed-based initiatives: (1) engaging the community, (2) developing a governance structure, (3) building community capacity for implementation, and (4) learning while doing. Post-neonatal Mortality: Number of deaths reported by vital records, program records, care giver from 29 days to 364 days after birth.
Pregnant Woman: A female from the time that she conceives to 60 days after birth, delivery, or expulsion of fetus. Prenatal Clinic Visits: All known medical prenatal care visits made by Healthy Start pregnant clients residing in the project area during the reporting period. The prenatal care visit is made for medical supervision of the pregnancy by a physician or other health care provider during the pregnancy. Preterm Births: Live births that occur at 17 through 36 weeks of gestation. Program Participant: A program participant is defined as an individual having direct contact with Healthy Start staff or subcontractors and receiving Healthy Start services on an ongoing systematic basis to improve perinatal and infant health. Specifically, program participants are pregnant women and women of reproductive age and children up to age 2. Project Area: A geographic area for which improvements have been planned and are being implemented with the Healthy Start principles of: innovation, community commitment and involvement, increased access, service integration, and personal responsibility. A project area must represent a reasonable and logical catchment area. The proposed project area is identified and approved through the initial Healthy Start funding application process. Healthy Start services can only be provided to residents of the approved project area. Changes to this project area cannot be made without prior approval of HRSA/MCHB. Project Period: The total time for which Healthy Start funding has been programmatically approved for a proj-ect (e.g. four years, two years). A project period may consist of one or more budget periods (defined above). The total project period comprises the original project period and any extensions. For the purpose of this FOA, the four years and nine months project period is September 1, 2014 – May 31, 2019. Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS Provider Training (Number of Individual Providers Trained): Number of individual providers (professional and paraprofessional workers) participating in Healthy Start funded formalized training activities.
Public Information/Education (Number of Individuals Reached): Number of individuals informed on perinatal issues by Healthy Start media campaigns, health fairs, hotlines, or other Healthy Start funded media activities. Includes persons residing outside the PA who often hear, observe, or respond to Healthy Start media messages via television, radio, bus and/or theater advertisements which by design are directed at the PA community.
Quality and Safety: The primary care medical home demonstrates a commitment to quality and quality improvement by ongoing engagement in activities such as using evidence-based medicine and clinical deci-sion-support tools to guide shared decision making with patients and families, engaging in performance mea-surement and improvement, measuring and responding to patient experiences and patient satisfaction, and practicing population health management. Quality Improvement: A process of systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement, particularly around health care services and the health status of targeted population. Race: Racial and ethnic categories reflect Federal Register Announcement "Office of Management and Bud-get: Revisions to Standards for Classification of Federal Data on Race and Ethnicity; Notices" issued October 30, 1997. The response should reflect what the person considers herself to be and is not based on percentages of ancestry. Hispanic' refers to those people whose origins are from Spain, Mexico, or the Spanish speaking countries of Central and South America- Origin can be viewed as the ancestry, nationality, lineage, or country in which the person or his or her ancestors were born before their arrival in the United States. Recommended Number of Well-Child Visits During the First Year of Life: Number of infants at age 12 months or older who received the recommended number of well-child visits for their age. Reproductive Life Plan: A tool to assist women in determining if or when they plan to have children in the future, and in identifying family planning methods to help them fulfill their plan. Services Specific to Parenting Teens: Number of adolescents receiving services from a Healthy Start affiliated program designed for parenting teens. Services Specific to Pregnant Teens: Number of adolescents receiving services from a Healthy Start affiliated program designed for pregnant teens.
Smoking Cessation (Number of Participants Who Received): Number of participants who have attended support groups, or one-on-one counseling sessions providing information to pregnant women, their partners, or parents of infants on a regular basis about the risks to the fetus and infant of smoking parents; and provided support and information on how to quit. Social Capital: The expected collective or economic benefits derived from cross-sector community engagement.
Social Determinants of Health: The social determinants of health are the circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work and age, and the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics. Substance Abuse Treatment and Counseling: Number of Healthy Start participants who received substance Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide HS GLOSSARY/DEFINITIONS abuse treatment, counseling and/or referrals. Services may include an array of medical services, including testing and treatment for concurrent HIV/AIDS and/or STDs and psychiatric, psychological or social services which are either provided by a single site or case managed across multiple sites, family and collateral/partner counseling and rehabilitation. Sustainability: Projects should foster community partnerships and build capacity and/or program resources that continue as needed in that community after federal funds discontinue. A sustained project is one that demon-strates the continuation of key elements of program/service components started under the MCHB supported project. Sustainability Plan: A set of administrative actions designed to identify and negotiate the continued financing and/or transition of project components to other entities to continue the provision of successful project services in the project area beyond the Federal Healthy Start funded project period. Total # of Deliveries/Births During the Reporting Period: All live births during the reporting period to Healthy Start participants. Toxic Stress: Stress caused by extreme poverty, neglect, abuse, exposure to violence, or severe maternal depres-sion can weaken the architecture of the developing brain, with long-term consequences for learning and both physical and mental health.
Traumatic-Informed Care: An approach that is welcoming and appropriate for trauma survivors (e.g., those with ACE or toxic stress), including avoiding re-traumatization. A trauma-informed child- and family-service approach is one in which all parties involved recognize and respond to the impact of ACE, trauma, and toxic stress on children, caregivers, and service providers. Urban: Territory, population, and housing units located within an urbanized area (UA) or an urban cluster (UC), which has: a population density of at least 1,000 people per square mile; and surrounding census blocks with an overall density of at least 500 people per square mile. Very Low Birth Weight: Live births with birth weight less than 1,500 grams. This measure is usually reported as a percentage of all live births. Well Baby/Pediatric Care Clinic: All ambulatory pediatric care visits made by Healthy Start infant clients resid-ing in the project area, excluding ER visits during the reporting period. Well Child Visit 2-4 Weeks After Birth: Number of infants whose care giver reports having a well-child visit during this time period. Well Women Visit: A preventive care visit annually for adult women to obtain the recommended preventive ser-vices that are age and developmentally appropriate, including preconception care and many services necessary for prenatal care.
Youth Empowerment/Peer Education/Self-Esteem Mentor Programs: Number of non-pregnant/non-parenting teens who are served by these specified Healthy Start programs. This may include group activities (e.g. Family Life Center activities, Teen Life Center activities, Male Mentoring Programs, Self-Esteem Programs, etc.). Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide Healthy Start EPIC Center Branding and Style Guide

Source: https://www.nphic.org/media/k2/attachments/Awards/2015/Print/PGSP-IH-NH-HealthyStartBrandingandStyleGu.pdf

Influence of antihypertensive therapy on cerebral perfusion in patients with metabolic syndrome: relationship with cognitive function and 24‐h arterial blood pressure monitoring

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Influence of Antihypertensive Therapy on Cerebral Perfusion inPatients with Metabolic Syndrome: Relationship with CognitiveFunction and 24-h Arterial Blood Pressure Monitoring Nataliya Y. Efimova,1,2 Vladimir I. Chernov,1,2 Irina Y. Efimova1 & Yuri B. Lishmanov1,2 1 Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution, Research Institute for Cardiology, Tomsk, Russia2 National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia

Promega notes 100: novel biosensors to monitor cellular events in live cells

LIVE-CELL BIOSENSOR Novel Biosensors to Monitor Cellular Events in Live Cells Review of Fan, F. et al. (2008) Novel genetically encoded biosensors using firefly luciferase. ACS Chem. Biol. 3, 346–51. Neal Cosby, Promega Corporation entists targeted the hinge region of the luciferase mol- Drug discovery and life science researchers desire to