Background


Draft 2014
Activity
Document

OctOber 2013
International Life Sciences Institute


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013


Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013


Foreword

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013


FOREWORD
BY THE EXECUTIVE AND SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
GOVERNANCE
Credibility, transparency, visibility and efficacy form the basis of the new management of ILSI Europe. The latest changes illustrate this new direction: the role of the task force and expert group Chairs are defined more clearly, an academic Co-Chair is introduced in all task forces, and our rules and procedures are more transparent. I was pleased to learn during our last Annual Symposium that our members appreciate this new impetus. A recent member survey also indicated the identification of emerging issues and dissemination of our scientific outputs as great opportunities for the future. One of the main strengths of ILSI Europe is the high quality of our scientific publications. Over the years, ILSI Europe has published more than 300 scientific publications which were cited more than 12,500 times. If ILSI Europe was a researcher his h-index would reach 56; ‘Dr ILSI Europe' would easily be eligible for professorship in any European university or academy of science. In this regard, ILSI Europe has newly decided to shift its focus to publications in peer-reviewed journals. We launched in June 2013 a call for new members of the Board of Directors (BOD), for the Scientific Advisory Committee and the Publication Committee (PUB) to replace those members whose term ends. I am pleased to welcome Prof. Robert Hamer (Unilever) and Dr Ralf-Michael Schmidt (Südzucker/BENEO Group) who have been elected through the fast-track written electoral procedure as new Board members in September 2013, thus filling the two vacant seats since June 2013. The new SAC and PUB members will be appointed this Autumn. 2013 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM
The ILSI Europe 2013 Annual Symposium took place in Brussels on 26-27 March 2013. This year, ILSI Europe organised for the first time a workshop to brainstorm on our portfolio, future scientific strategy and long-term action plan. This was an excellent opportunity for us to engage more with our members in an open way. Our Board of Directors (BOD) and Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) are reviewing the recommendations drawn up from this symposium and focusing on the structure, governance, credibility and transparency of the Institute. Other fundamental aspects such as the impact, collaborations and communication of ILSI Europe are also addressed. The final recommendations will be presented at the 2014 Annual Symposium that will take place on 20-21 March 2014. Save the date! In the meantime, ILSI Europe will build on the existing structure to strengthen its scientific credibility and better address emerging issues. There are on-going discussions to organise our activities around three key pillars: Food Safety, Nutrition and Societal Aspects/Sustainability. Under each pillar, sub-committees of the SAC have been created to reinforce the scientific alignment amongst our task forces and to increase their collaboration. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013



KEY ACHIEVEMENTS IN 2013

Expert Groups
In 2013, 14 new activities started covering the fields of food processing on the allergenicity,
fluid and water intake, uncertainties in food intake assessments, growth curves and
metabolic disorders, industrial microbiological risk assessment, low-grade inflammation and
markers in nutrition research, to cite only a few. Our new review procedure for new activity
proposals (NAP) strengthens the scientific programme of these activities.
There are currently 10 new activity proposals and one new task force proposal under review.
Amongst other topics, these activites cover self-regulation of food intake from infancy to
adolescence, n-3 and n-6 PUFAs intakes, nutrition for the ageing brain, fortification and
supplements for the elderly, dietary fibers and satiety.
EU Projects
ILSI Europe is currently involved in 8 EU projects. Two projects were launched this year,
iFAAM (Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management) and
PATHWAY-27 (Pivotal Assessment of the Effects of Bioactives on the Health and Wellbeing,
from Human Genome to Food Industry).
A new EU-project called EFFORT (Ecology from Farm to Fork Of microbial drug Resistance
and Transmission) will start in November this year. EFFORT will study the antimicrobial
resistance and the interactions between bacterial communities, commensals and pathogens
in animals, the food chain and the environment.
Publications
Since the beginning of 2013, 20 peer-reviewed articles have already been published. The
Concise Monograph entitled ‘Prebiotics, Probiotics and Gut Microbiota' has been very
successful with more than 1650 downloads since last April. The Report ‘Safety Implications
of the Presence of Nucleic Acids of Inactivated Microorganisms in Foods' is another useful
tool for those involved in microbiological issues. I am also pleased to announce that 6
manuscripts have recently been accepted for publications and should come out in the
coming weeks.
Events
A workshop on ‘Low-grade Inflammation: a High Grade Chal enge' took place on the 15th of
September in Granada (ES) prior to the 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN 2013).
76 participants discussed the challenges of low-grade inflammation and its importance as a
pathological feature of numerous common chronic diseases.
ILSI Europe and 5 other ILSI branches (namely HESI, ILSI China, ILSI Japan, ILSI North
America, ILSI Southeast Asia Region) organised 3 scientific sessions at ICN 2013. The ILSI
booth also received a high number of visitors which was a great opportunity to present ILSI
Europe amongst the ILSI family and distribute our latest publications.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013



ILSI Europe Structure ILSI Europe Structure



Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure Founded in 1978, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) is a non-profit, worldwide foundation that seeks to improve the well-being of the general public through the advancement of science. Its goal is to further the understanding of scientific issues relating to nutrition, food safety, toxicology, risk assessment, and the environment. ILSI is recognised around the world for the quality of the research it supports, the global conferences and workshops it sponsors, the educational projects it initiates, and the publications it produces. ILSI is headquartered in Washington, DC. It is affiliated with the World Health Organization (WHO) as a non-governmental organisation and has special consultative status with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. ILSI branches include Argentina, Brazil, Europe, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, North Africa and the Gulf Region, North America, North Andean, South Africa, South Andean, Southeast Asia Region, Taiwan, the Focal Point in China, and the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. The branches are funded primarily by their industry members. ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe was created in 1986 to focus on the specific needs defined by the Institute's European partners. ILSI Europe fosters collaboration among the best scientists to provide evidence-based scientific consensus in the areas of nutrition, food safety, toxicology, risk assessment, and the environment. By facilitating their collaboration, ILSI Europe helps scientists from many sectors of society – public and private – to best address complex science and health issues by sharing their unique knowledge and perspectives. ILSI Europe advances the understanding and resolution of scientific issues through expert groups, workshops, symposia and resulting publications. The ultimate goal of ILSI Europe is the improvement of public health. Our areas of interest cover risk assessments, new technologies, functional foods, microbiology, packaging, gut health, healthy ageing, obesity and metabolic syndrome, environment and sustainability, dietary intake, nutritional and fuctional status, claims guidance to cite only a few. Our core values are:  PUBLIC BENEFIT: All scientific activities have a public health purpose and benefit;  COLLABORATION: Scientists from many sectors of society – public and private – can best address complex science and health issues by sharing their unique knowledge and perspectives;  TRANSPARENCY: All scientific activities are conducted in an open and transparent manner and all scientific outcomes are made available to the public to ensure confidence in the integrity of the process and outcomes. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure All ILSI Europe activities are conducted under the supervision of the Scientific Advisory Committee. With its balanced composition, the Scientific Advisory Committee plays an important role in reviewing all activities with respect to their scientific validity and coherence with ILSI Europe's programme. The Scientific Advisory Committee provides scientific advice to the Board of Directors. ILSI policy mandates that the ILSI and ILSI branch Boards of Directors must be composed of at least 50% public sector scientists; the remaining directors represent ILSI's member companies. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

* Chairman, Vice-Chairman, President, Vice-President, Treasurer
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MEMBERS
The General Assembly of Members provides programme and financial oversight for all ILSI Europe activities and is the ultimate decision-making body on which all member companies are represented. The General Assembly elects the Board of Directors. Member Companies
Abbott Nutrition McNeil Nutritionals Ajinomoto Europe Mead Johnson Nutrition Merck Consumer Healthcare Barilla G&R Fratelli Mondelēz International Campbell Soup Company PepsiCo International Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Coca-Cola Europe Pierre Fabre Dermo-Cosmétique Cosucra Groupe Warcoing Procter & Gamble DuPont de Nemours Royal FrieslandCampina Sanofi-Aventis R&D Givaudan International Soremartec Italia – Ferrero Group Ingredion Incorporated Südzucker/BENEO Group Institut Mérieux Swiss Quality Testing Services – SQTS International Nutrition Company Syngenta Crop Protection Kikkoman Foods Europe Tetra Pak Research McDonald's Europe Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
SELECTION COMMITTEE
A Selection Committee recommends to the General Assembly candidates to fill the vacancies in the Board of Directors. The Selection Committee is composed of the President, the Chairman, two non-director members, and two non-industry scientists of international renown nominated by the General Assembly and representing different geographical regions of Europe. The Committee is chaired by the President. The Board of Directors recommends to the General Assembly candidates to fill the Selection Committee vacancies. Members of the Selection Committee (11 June 2013)
Non-industry Members
Industry Members
Prof. Gerhard Eisenbrand – Chairman
Prof. John O'Brien
University of Kaiserslautern Prof. em Andrew Renwick
Dr Anne Franck
University of Southampton Prof. Gérard Pascal
Dr Hervé Nordmann
Ajinomoto Europe BOARD OF DIRECTORS
The Board of Directors is the managing body of the Institute. It is composed of an equal number of member company representatives and of scientists from academic institutions in order to ensure a balanced input. Each year, 1/3 of the Members of the Board of Directors shall retire but shall be eligible for re-election. Candidates recommended by the Selection Committee to fill the Board vacancies are elected for a 3-year term by the General Assembly. The Board of Directors' remit is to direct and control the management of the Institute, such as:  To elect the President, the Chairman, the Vice-President, the Vice-Chairman and the Treasurer among the members of the Board of Directors;  To prepare the annual accounts and to propose the budget of the forthcoming year;  To propose amendments to the Charter of Incorporation, changes in the structure of the Institute or the dissolution of the Institute to the General Assembly. The Board of Directors' remit is also to direct and control the scientific activities of the Insitute, such as:  To approve the scientific content of the programme following advice of the Scientific Advisory Committee, to ensure its execution, and to report back on the progress and status of the programme to the General Assembly;  To decide upon the composition of the Scientific Committees (Scientific Advisory Committees, Publication Committee) and propose the establishment or dissolution of Scientific Committees to the General Assembly. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure Members of the Board of Directors (26 September 2013)
Non-industry Members
Industry Members
Prof. Gerhard Eisenbrand – President*
Prof. John O'Brien – Chairman*
University of Kaiserslautern Prof. Alan Boobis – Vice-President*
Dr Geoff Thompson – Vice-Chairman*
Imperial College London Prof. Corrado Lodovico Galli
Prof. Peter Weber – Treasurer*
University of Milan Prof. Alain Grynberg
Dr Stephen French
INRA - Université Paris 13 Prof. Richard Hurrell
Prof. Robert Hamer
Federal Institute of Technology – ETH Prof. Doris Marko
Dr Mariusz Michalik
University of Vienna PepsiCo International Prof. Gerhard Rechkemmer
Dr Mike Knowles
Max Rubner-Institut – Federal Research The Coca-Cola Company Institute of Nutrition and Food Prof. Arpad Somogyi
Dr Ralf-Michael Schmidt
Hungarian Academy of Science Südzucker/BENEO Group Prof. Viktor Tutelyan
Prof. Colette Shortt
National Nutrition Institute McNeil Nutritionals Prof. Gregorio Varela-Moreiras
Dr Julian Stowell
University San-Pablo–CEU of Madrid DuPont Nutrition and Health
* Officers

Previous Chairs:
Prof. Gert Meijer, Unilever, NL
January 2013 – May 2013 Mr Reg Fletcher, Kellogg, IE June 2009 – December 2012 Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE
The Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) is composed of a maximum of 20 experts with more than 50% coming from the non-industry sector. It is chaired by the President of ILSI Europe and Vice-Chaired by the Vice-President. The members of the SAC are appointed by the Board of Directors according to their relevant expertise, their prestige and availability for active contribution. The tasks of the Scientific Advisory Committee are:  To review and endorse the overall scientific programme of ILSI Europe, including the new activities with respect to their scientific validity, coherence within ILSI Europe's programme, feasibility, urgency of the issues;  To monitor the composition of expert groups and scientific advisors to task forces to ensure scientific integrity;  To provide scientific guidance to the task forces;  To identify emerging issues to be dealt with by ILSI Europe;  To advise the Board of Directors on scientific matters. Members of the Scientific Advisory Committee (01 January 2013)
Non-industry Members
Industry Members
Prof. Gerhard Eisenbrand – Chairman
Dr Rolf Bos
University of Kaiserslautern Royal FrieslandCampina Prof. Alan Boobis – Vice-Chairman
Dr Roberto Ciati
Imperial College London Barilla G&R Fratelli Dr Bjarke Bak Christensen
Dr Anne Franck
Danish Institute for Food & Veterinary Research (DK) Prof. Klaus Grunert
Dr Clare Leonard
Aarhus School of Business Mondelēz International Dr Helga Gunnlaugsdottir
Dr Diederick Meyer
MATIS – Food Research, Innovation & Safety Prof. Jana Hajslova
Dr Hervé Nordmann
Institute of Chemical Technology Ajinomoto Europe Ms Anne-Mette Jensen
Dr Bizhan Pourkomailian
European Commission Joint Research Centre McDonald's Europe Prof. Dietrich Knorr
Dr Benjamin Smith
Berlin University of Technology Prof. Hubert Kolb
Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf Prof. Alfredo Martinez Hernandez
University of Navarra Prof. Bernhard Watzl
Max Rubner-Institut – Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Composed of members from academia and industry with experience in publishing, writing and editing, the Publication Committee co-ordinates the peer-review process and ensures the quality of ILSI Europe's Concise Monographs Series and Reports Series. The members are elected by the Board of Directors. Their role is:  To monitor the overall publication process, in collaboration with the respective task forces and expert groups;  To maintain and broaden the network of collaborating scientific authors;  To ensure adequate dissemination of publications;  To keep the Scientific Advisory Committee and the Board of Directors informed of the actions taken and the progress made, in accordance with the general scientific programme of ILSI Europe. Members of the Publication Committee
Mr John Howlett – Chair
Scientific Advisor
Prof. Nathalie Gontard
University of Montpellier Dr Irène Lenoir-Wijnkoop
Dr Jan Steijns
Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Vasilis Valdramidis
University of Malta Prof. Paul Walter
University of Basel Prof. Martin Wickham
Leatherhead Food Research Dr Gunna Würtzen
Scientific Advisor Dr Kevin Yates
Scientific Advisor Ms Fanny Rollin
ILSI Europe Communication Manager Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
TASK FORCES AND EXPERT GROUPS

Task Forces
Task forces initiate, develop and manage all projects. Task forces comprise interested
company representatives and non-industry experts whenever required. They reach their
goals and address their issues through expert groups, European Commission-funded
projects, workshops, conferences, literature reviews and publications.
The establishment of a new task force results from a process through which a new activity
proposal, after a review procedure by the Scientific Advisory Committee, is approved by the
Board of Directors. A task force is funded by its supporting member companies and is
disbanded when the programme is completed or if company support is below the required
minimum of 5 supporting member companies.
Expert Groups
Once the task force has identified a new activity, a new activity proposal is developed and
submitted for review by the Scientific Advisory Committee and approval by the Board of
Directors. The Chairman, the President and the Executive and Scientific Director approve
expert group members and (for in-house publications) the external reviewers.
Once approved by the Scientific Advisory Committee and the Board of Directors, the task
force members invite experts,mostly from universities or research institutes, as well as
advisors from regulatory bodies to carry out the work. Expert groups comprise at least 50%
academic scientists and up to 50% industry scientists, usually up to twelve members in total.
The task force provides the terms of reference to the expert group, identifying the issues to
be addressed.
The expert group is responsible for the actual work, i.e. collecting information, discussing and
writing a scientific paper (scientific articles in peer reviewed journals, ILSI Europe Report
Series or ILSI Europe Monographs). The task force reviews the first draft of the paper to
ensure that the set objectives of an activity have been met. Then, the paper is primarily
submitted to a scientific peer-reviewed journal. It can also be submitted to the Publication
Committee for Report Series and Concise Monographs.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
ILSI EUROPE STAFF
The ILSI Europe staff is responsible for the overall organisation, coordination and accomplishment of the tasks and activities entrusted to the committees, task forces and expert groups. Organigramme of ILSI Europe from 1st November 2013 on
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure
Contact details

Prof. Bánáti, Diána
Executive and Scientific Director Dr Vidry, Stéphane
Senior Scientific Programme Coordinator  +32 2 775 00 14 Ms Antonio, Belinda
Project Assistant Ms Aslanidis, Toula
Project Assistant Ms Baka, Athanasia
Scientific Project Manager Dr Chiodini, Alessandro
Scientific Project Manager Mr Faludi, Roland
Scientific Project Manager Mr Karekezi, Jonathan
Accounting Manager Dr Jasti, Pratima
Scientific Project Manager Ms Latulippe, Marie
Scientific Project Manager Ms Malherbe, Fabienne
Scientific Project Manager Ms Maniraho, Karen
Accounting Assistant Ms Marquet, Ruth
Conference and Membership Manager Mr Mouelhi, Pierre
Office Assistant Mr Rankin, Alex
Project Assistant Ms Rollin, Fanny
Communication Manager Mr Timmermans, Frederic Office Manager
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Structure Scientific Activities



Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities OVERVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITIES
Food Safety Task Forces
Expert Groups
Is the Intake of Vitamins, Minerals and Other Substances from Foods Changing in the EU? Addition of Nutrients to Food
The Role of Menaquinones (Vitamin K2) in Human Health (see pag Safety Implications of the Presence of Nucleic Acids in Foods (see page Emerging Microbiological Issues
Quality of Water used in the Production of Fresh Produce (see pag Understanding the Impact of Crop and Food Production Environment and Health
on the Water Environment – A Sustainable Approach (see pag Allergenicity and Processing (see page Prioritisation of Allergenic Foods with Respect to Public Food Allergy
Health Relevance (see pag From Thresholds to Action Levels (see pag Adequate Methodologies for Recording Fluid and Water Intake at Population Level (see page Identifying Practical Ways of Determining Uncertainties Food Intake Methodology
in Food Intake Assessments (see page GUIDEA: Guidance for Dietary Intake Exposure Assessment (see pag New Strategies for Safety Assessment of (Novel) Foods Novel Foods and Nanotechnology
and Ingredients (see page Non-intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) in Food Contact Materials (see pag Packaging Materials
Outlook and Challenges of Nanotechnologies for Food Packaging (see page Determination of the Effectiveness of Dietary Exposure Process-related Compounds and
Reduction Measures on Human Health (see page Natural Toxins
Review on Analytical Methods to Determine 3-MCPD Esters in Food Products (see pag Industrial Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) (see pag Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology
History-Based Performance of the HACCP Control Systems to Verify the Effectiveness of Food Safety Management (see pag Is the 0.15 µg/day Tier of the Threshold of Toxicological Threshold of Toxicological Concern
Concern (TTC) still Appropriate? (see pag New Task Force Proposals
Follow up to the former EU project BRAFO (Risk-Benefit Analysis of Foods): Risk / Benefit
assessment for plant extracts, micronutrients and supplements
(see page
Changes in approaches to chemical risk assessment due to emerging methods in toxicity
testing
(see page
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities Nutrition Task Forces
Expert Groups
Quantifying the Health Impact of Reduced Post-prandial Glycaemia (see page Dietary Carbohydrates
Impact of Post-prandial Glycaemia on Health and Disease (see pag The Nutritional Impacts of Reduced-Energy Sweetener Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance
Use: What Is the Weight of Evidence? (see page Marker Validation Initiative: Developing Consensus on Criteria to Evaluate Markers in Nutrition Research (see pag Functional Foods
Marker Validation Initiative: Approach A, Review of Existing Criteria for Selecting Markers (see pag Antioxidants and Anti-inflammatory Agents, Concise Monograph (see page Early Growth Velocity and Risk of Metabolic Disorders Later in Life (see pag Metabolic Imprinting
Long-term Health Outcomes from Early Life Nutritional Interventions (see page Adequacy of Dietary Fibre Intake of the European Population with Reference to Both Total and Specific Nutrient Requirements
Types of Fibre (see page The Role of Menaquinones (Vitamin K2) in Human Health (see pag Low-Grade Inflammation in Ageing: Causes and Consequences (see pag Selecting and Interpreting Markers of Immunomodulation Nutrition and Immunity in Man
in Nutrition Studies (see page Biomarkers of Inflammation: Guidance for Nutrition Intervention Studies (see pag Measuring and Validating the Subjective Effects of Food on Mood and Mental Performance (see page Brain Imaging for Early Detection of Nutrition Effects Nutrition and Mental Performance
Test of Cognitive Function in Nutrition Interventions (see pag Establishment of the Efficacy of Intervention in those with the Metabolic Syndrome (see pag Obesity and Diabetes
Low-Grade Inflammation: A High-grade Challenge – (formerly Metabolic Syndrome and Biomarkers and Modulation by Dietary Strategies Nutritional Management of Post-Prandial Glycaemia (see pag Health Benefits of Prebiotics, Looking at Microbial Prebiotics
Fermentation and Metabolism (see page Probiotics, Prebiotics and the Gut Microbiota (see page Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities Nutrition Task Forces
Expert Groups
Probiotics: Interplay with the Intestinal Barrier Function (see pag Probiotics
Selecting and Interpreting Markers of Immunomodulation in Nutrition Studies (see page Probiotics, Prebiotics and the Gut Microbiota (see page Societal Aspects Task Force
Expert Group
Consumer Risk and Benefit Communication for Food Consumer Science
Technologies (see pag EU Projects
Integrated In Silico Models for the Prediction of Human Repeated Dose Toxicity of Cosmetics to Optimise Safety (see pag Dieticians Ensuring Education, Teaching and Professional Quality (see pag Ecology of Drug Resistant Bacteria and Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance throughout the Food Chain Study on the Need for Food and Health Research EuroDISH
Infrastructures in Europe (see pag Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (see pag Application of New Technologies and Methods in Nutrition NutriTech
Research – the Example of Phenotypic Flexibility – NutriTech (see page Pivotal Assessment of the Effects of Bioactives on the PATHWAY-27
Health and Wellbeing, from Human Genome to Food Industry (see pag Total Diet Study Exposure (see page Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities



Food Safety Task Forces
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Addition of Nutrients to Food ADDITION OF NUTRIENTS TO FOOD TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Understanding the extent to which Europeans have an adequate micronutrient intake is a major challenge. The Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force explores the many ways where adding nutrients to food can improve public health. The task force also addresses the risk-benefit aspects of the intake of micronutrients and specific other substances (such as n-3 fatty acids). The specific aims are to: 1. Provide evidence by evaluating available scientific data on:  Requirement, intake and bioavailability of micronutrients and specific other  The safety of adding micronutrients and specific other substances to foods; 2. Translate the scientific evidence into practice (e.g. guidelines, modelling).  The task force has significantly contributed to the field of micronutrients by proposing robust and innovative methods for setting maximum levels for food fortification and supplements . Besides high intakes, the task force has given insight in the prevalence of intakes below the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) within Europe. Next, the task force plans to put forward methods for estimating the change of micronutrient intake over time, from all dietary sources, including fortified foods and dietary supplements.  Given the importance of this topic to public health, the outcomes of this task force are relevant to all stakeholders, and especially to the European Commission and the Member States. describes the current knowledge on menaquinones useful for setting dietary reference values (DRVs). It concludes that there is merit for considering both menaquinones and phylloquinone when developing future recommendations for vitamin K intake.  Achieving an understanding of the extent of micronutrient adequacy across Europe is a major challenge. The main objectives of the article were to collect and to evaluate the prevalence of low micronutrient intakes of different European countries by comparing recent nationally representative dietary survey data. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Addition of Nutrients to Food UPCOMING ACTIVITIES
 Europe is one of the regions where a significant number of countries face severe population ageing in the near future. The prevalence of malnutrition and undernutrition is high either in institutionalised and non-institutionalised elderly. The task force is developing an activity that aims to generate data that could support the preparation of dietary guidelines specific for elderly individuals to fight micronutrient deficiencies. This is in-line with the "Horizon 2020" priorities.  In the context of fortification practices, the interactions between food components within a food matrix is one key parameter that can influence the efficacy as well as the safety of a foodstuff. To date there are no guidelines available that describe a common accepted approach to investigate these interactions. The next activity in the roadmap of this task force will aim to develop a methodology that could be used by food industry and health authorities to assess the food component interactions. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Ellen van den Heuvel – Chair Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Suzanne Kettler – Vice-Chair Coca-Cola Europe Ms Yvette Azzopardi* European Commission – DG Health and Mr Edouard Casala Dr Stéphanie Jeansen Dr Szabolcs Peter Ms Tamara Rausch Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer EXPERT GROUP
IS THE INTAKE OF VITAMINS, MINERALS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES FROM FOODS CHANGING

IN THE EU?

Objective
The purpose of this project is to better understand how the implementation of the European
regulation on voluntary food fortification, in 2007, has affected the diet of the EU population.
The main novelty of the project is to investigate the changes in micronutrient intake before
and after 2007 when the regulation was implemented.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Addition of Nutrients to Food
Activity
The expert group is currently working on a case study, focusing on selected vitamins and
minerals (e.g. vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, folate) that are commonly used in fortified
foods in 7 target European countries. The case study will evaluate the availability of intake
data for these micronutrients in national intake dietary surveys, before and after the 2007
regulation.
Expected Outcome
A viewpoint paper proposing a framework to monitor existing data on dietary exposure to
micronutrients through voluntarily fortified foods at national level in the European Union has
been submitted for peer-reviewed publication. It is expected to encourage European
countries to fill the gaps in micronutrient intake surveys. Furthermore a case study report will
be submitted in a peer-reviewed journal.
Timeline
Publication Paper 1 Publication Paper 2 Submission Paper 2
Expert Group Members

Mr Edouard Casala ─ Chair
Dr Rikke Andersen Technical University of Denmark Ms Yvette Azzopardi* European Commission - DG Health and Dr George Boukouvalas* Hellenic Food Safety Authority Mr Paul Finglas* Institute of Food Research Dr Susanne Kettler Coca Cola Europe Dr Alison Lennox MRC Human Nutrition Research Dr Christope Matthys University of Leuven Dr Breige McNulty University College Dublin Dr Szabolcs Peter Dr Janneke Verkaik National Institute for Public Health and the Environment - RIVM Dr Jan Wollgast* European Commission - JRC-Ispra Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Addition of Nutrients to Food
EXPERT GROUP
THE ROLE OF MENAQUINONES (VITAMIN K2) IN HUMAN HEALTH

This joint effort with the Nutrient Requirements Task Force also contributed to the Marker Validation Initiative (see Functional Foods Task Force on page Objective
Beyond its classic role in coagulation, vitamin K takes part in the improvement of bone
health, and the reduction of vascular calcification and cardiovascular risk. Menaquinones,
also known as vitamin K2, could be more effective in these functions than phylloquinone, also
known as vitamin K1. However, present dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin K are
exclusively based on phylloquinone, and its function in coagulation. The main objective of
this activity is to review the need for specific DRVs for menaquinones.
Activity
The expert group conducted a thorough review of existing literature on dietary menaquinones
and their role in human health to evaluate whether unique recommendations for
menaquinone intake are justified at this time, and what additional information is needed to
have strong scientific underpinnings for establishing DRVs for menaquinones.
Outcome
This work resulted in a review paper published in thein 2013. It
concludes that, although there are significant gaps in the current knowledge on
menaquinones based on the criteria for setting DRVs, there is merit for considering both
menaquinones and phylloquinone when developing future recommendations for vitamin K
intake.
Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Addition of Nutrients to Food
Expert Group Members

Dr Cees Vermeer ─ Chair Maastricht University Dr El en van den Heuvel ─ Vice-Chair Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Joline Beulens University of Utrecht Tufts University Dr Marjolijn Bragt Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Elisabeth Stoecklin Ms Athanasia Baka LATEST PUBLICATIONS
J. Beulens, et alBritish Journal of Nutrition 2013;16:1-12. G.B.M. Mensink, et alBritish Journal of Nutrition 2013;110:755-773. A. Flynn, et al. Food and Nutrition Research 2009;(Suppl.1):1-51. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Athanasia Baka at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Emerging Microbiological Issues EMERGING MICROBIOLOGICAL ISSUES TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Foodborne diseases are a common, costly – yet preventable – public health problem. Despite all the measures implemented to reduce food safety risk, food-borne illnesses caused by Salmonella, Enterobacteria, and many other pathogens continue to pose health threats in Europe. The Emerging Microbiological Issues Task Force actively contributes to protect the public by reviewing and summarizing the knowledge on how pathogens emerge and why they persist. The task force also helps disseminate the methods used to detect and control these pathogens throughout the food chain. Based on these actions, the task force further provides recommendations for future research and current control options for pathogens under review.  The US National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods used the task force's publications as reference texts to promote and share best practice in the food industry and to facilitate a proactive response to emerging food safety issues.  The task force closely collaborates with the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP) to expand its dissemination network at international level.  Over the last 15 years, the task force has been successful in producing over 10 publications covering many various microorganisms such as Campylobacters, Salmonella Typhimurium, Mycobacterium avium, and animal-borne viruses.  The task force is partner in the European Commission funded project EFFORT: Ecology from Farm to Fork Of microbial drug Resistance and Transmission (see page . The project aims at studying antimicrobial resistance and the interactions between bacterial communities, commensals and pathogens in animals, the food chain and the environment.  The task force successfully organised on ‘Microbial Hazards in Water and QMRA to Assess Its Impact on Food Safety' within the frame of thein Marseille, in May 2013.  The latest ILSI Europe Report on , published in 2013, provides guidance on how to interpret results for the detection of nucleic acids from pathogenic microorganisms in raw materials and processed food products, including the detection of inactivated organisms. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Emerging Microbiological Issues
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Anett Winkler – Chair Mondelēz International Prof. Mieke Uyttendaele – Co-Chair Ghent Univeristy Dr John Donaghy – Vice-Chair Dr Isabelle Desforges Institut Mérieux Mr Rien Habraken Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Yvonne Stedman Senior Scientific Programme Coordinator Dr Stéphane Vidry EXPERT GROUP
SAFETY IMPLICATIONS OF THE PRESENCE OF NUCLEIC ACIDS IN FOODS


Objective
Food manufacturing usually includes one or more processing steps to inactivate pathogens
and spoilage microorganisms. As a result, viable microorganisms will no longer be present,
or only at very low levels. However, many macromolecules (such as nucleic acids) are still
largely intact and potentially harmful. This activity aims at highlighting the fate of nucleic
acids in raw and processed foods.
Activity
This project aims at identifying potential reservoirs of spoilage organisms, source of nucleic
acids (bacterial, viral, protozoal, etc.) which may be found in the final product as well as the
type and state of nucleic acids likely to be found post processing. Another key aspect would
be to address the power and shortcomings of molecular methods used for detection of
nucleic acids.
Expected Outcome
The expert group is aiming to provide guidance on how to interpret the presence of nucleic
acids from (living or inactivated) pathogenic microorganisms in raw materials and processed
food products. The gaps in the molecular detection methods will be outlined. The first
outcome of this activity was published in the ILSI Europe Report Series .
It provides guidance on the interpretation of results for the detection of nucleic acids from
pathogenic microorganisms in raw materials and processed food products. A follow-up article
will be submitted in Winter 2013.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Emerging Microbiological Issues
Timeline


Expert Group Members

Dr John Donaghy ─ Chair University of Turin Mr Pierre Renault National Institute for Agricultural Research - Prof. Marc van Ranst University of Leuven Dr Stéphane Vidry EXPERT GROUP
QUALITY OF WATER USED IN THE PRODUCTION OF FRESH PRODUCE


Objective
Consumption of fresh products, including fruits and vegetables, has been increasing
worldwide, which improves nutrient intake and reduces disease risk. However, fresh products
are more likely to transmit waterborne and foodborne diseases. The main objective of this
activity is to assess the role of water quality in the production of fresh produce and evaluate
the associated microbial safety risks.
Activity
The group is preparing two articles and a comprehensive report covering the role of
production and process of waters in pathogen contamination and subsequent outbreaks of
foodborne disease. The activity provides an array of the most harmful pathogens in fresh
products, especially those linked to water sources used in (primary) production and packing.
Factors impacting survival of these pathogens and the role of irrigation and process waters
are also addressed.
Outcome
The expected scientific publications will be of interest to a wide range of stakeholders:
farmers associations and cooperatives, food manufacturers and wholesalers/retailers
responsible for sourcing fresh produce. Food safety authorities, certification bodies and
international organisations responsible for ensuring food safety and public health could also
use this work to develop and implement guidelines and procedures to assure safe food.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Emerging Microbiological Issues
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Anett Winkler ─ Chair
Mondelēz International International Water Management Institute International Water Management Institute Food and Agriculture Organization – FAO Food and Agriculture Organization – FAO Dr Vittorio Fattori Food and Agriculture Organization – FAO Prof. Maria Claudia Campos Universidad Javeriana Dr David Cunliffe Scientific Advisor Dr Charles Gerba University of Arizona Dr Liesbeth Jacxsens University of Ghent Prof. Lee-Ann Jaykus North Carolina State University Prof. Lise Korsten University of Pretoria Nanyang Polytechnic Prof. Gertjan Medema Delft University of Technology Prof. Maria Tereza Pepe University of Sao Paulo Dr Marcelo Signorini National Institute of Agricultural Technology Prof. Mieke Uyttendaele Ghent University Dr Flavio Zambrone Dr Stéphane Vidry
LATEST PUBLICATIONS

L. Cocolin, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2013:1-33. L. Beuchat, et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2011:1-48. C. Baylis, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2011:1-48. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Environment and Health ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Climate change, population growth and changing consumption pose serious threats to the ability to produce enough food to feed the world. Efforts for increasing the amount of food may impact the environment and may not lead to sufficient food quality and quantity. The objective of the ILSI Europe Environment and Health Task Force is to develop science-based assessments to better understand the impact of the various steps along the food production chain on the environment and on human health. Existing frameworks and metrics will be taken into consideration. The task force is identifying appropriate parameters and is developing measures regarding sustainable solutions for the environment and human health across interested stakeholders.  The task force developed guidelines in a to encourage sustainable use of water at all stages of production, from farm to fork. Firstly these were focused on reducing the use of water of unnecessarily high quality after unnecessary treatment by looking at options for more efficient use of water resources. Secondly globally grown oil crops were taken as an example for assessing practices of the rain and irrigation water use. Results were used to suggest a way forward to improve sustainable water use in the agricultural crop production.  The availability of fresh water and the quality of aquatic ecosystems are important global concerns, and agriculture plays a major role. Therefore, the task force published a manuscript focusing on understanding the impact of crop and food production on the water environment, using sugar as a model The paper illustrates how the impact of cultivation and processing of food ingredients on the water environment can vary enormously depending on plant type, cultivation practices, climate and the local water resource status. Through evaluation of sugar it provides a template for the assessment of other crops. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Environment and Health UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 Ensuring resource efficiency is a Europe 2020 flagship initiative aimed at securing Europe's global competitiveness. There is thus an urgent need to harmonise the assessment tools of food loss and food waste, as well as sustainability at large. The task force is currently preparing a New Activity Proposal for assessing the impact of food production on environmental sustainability along the food supply chain. First, current sustainability indicators used in the food industry will be identified and evaluated. Then, the most relevant ones will be used in assessing how food technologies might contribute to sustainability. In a case study, the assessment of food loss and food waste will be used to apply and validate the selected indicators. Join us in this activity; help us reduce the major uncertainties in the assessment of sustainability in all steps of the food production systems. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Jochen Schulze-Aurich – Chair Syngenta Crop Protection Dr António Calado Dr Malyka Galay Burgos European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) Dr Thomas Hatzold Mondelēz International Dr Regina Oberdörfer Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Mr Roland Faludi EXPERT GROUP
UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT OF CROP AND FOOD PRODUCTION ON THE WATER
ENVIRONMENT – A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH


Objective
The availability of fresh water and the quality of aquatic ecosystems are important global
concerns, and agriculture plays a major role. Consumers and manufacturers are increasingly
sensitive to sustainability issues related to processed food products and drinks. The activity
aims to review the impact of crop and food production on the water environment.
Activity
The activity looked at water consumption in sugar production, water quality impacts and
mitigation of the impact of water use. Beet and cane sugar were used as relevant crop
models to investigate water sustainability in the food supply chain.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Environment and Health
Outcome
The article has been published in the It
reviews the major stages where growers and sugar processors could improve the efficiency
of water use and reducing environmental impact, highlighting where further advances can be
made. A range of tools (e.g. Water Footprinting) are available for food companies to
evaluate, quantify and mitigate risks related to water availability and quality.
Timeline


Expert Group Members

Dr Tim Hess ─ Chair Cranfield University The Complutense University of Madrid Scientific Advisor Broom's Barn Research Centre (Rothamsted Research) Prof. Dragan Savic University of Exeter Dr Ruediger Schaub Mr Roland Faludi
LATEST PUBLICATIONS

T. Hess, et al. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 2013. Published online: DOI:10.1002/jsfa.6369. F. Ludwig, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2011:1-38. D. Turley, et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2011:1-28. For more detailed information, please contact Mr Roland Faludi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 FOOD ALLERGY TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Food allergy is of high importance to public health, affecting consumers' quality of life (mainly children) and impacting health service resources. There is growing evidence that this impact is increasing at a global level as countries adopt a Western lifestyle. The symptoms range from a tingling sensation in the mouth to life-threatening anaphylactic shock. Minimising the risk from allergenic foods is a shared responsibility of all the stakeholders involved (patients, clinicians, food manufacturers, retailers, caterers and regulators). The Food Allergy Task Force aims to foster an international consensus on how to assess the risk and the standards necessary to achieve this goal.  Over the past 18 years the Food Allergy Task Force has significantly contributed to the understanding of food allergy as a food safety issue and to the development of risk assessment approaches to address it (e.g. setting action levels). It has produced 9 peer-reviewed publications and organised several workshops.  The task force and its expert groups consist of a strong network of international experts and include among its partners world-class experts and leading organisations such as the Food Allergy Research & Resource Program (FARRP) and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI).  The task force is a partner of the EU project iFAAM, Integrated Approaches to Food Allergen and Allergy Risk Management (see pag. This project aims to improve the management of both food allergens and food allergy. ILSI Europe will be a key partner in the dissemination to stakeholders, through the organisation of workshops and symposia, as well as other activities.  The task force led a ILSI Food Allergy session at the 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN) in Granada, September 2013. This provided an overview of the global effort that has been undertaken to review new low-dose challenge data and tools to analyse these data and apply them to quantitative risk assessment.  A recent publication led to proposals on how to weigh and combine evidence on allergen severity, potency and prevalence.  on ‘Food Al ergy: From Thresholds to Action Levels', was held on 13-14 September 2012, in Reading (UK). This event was organised in collaboration with ILSI North America, ILSI Japan, FARRP, Health Canada and the University of Nebraska (US). Three papers will capture the outcomes of this workshop. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr René Crevel ─ Chair Mr Stefan Ronsmans ─ Vice-Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Simon Flanagan Mondelēz International PepsiCo International Dr Corinne Herouet-Guicheney Dr Brett Jeffery Dr Bert Pöpping Dr Frédérique Respondek Dr Marie-Claude Robert Kikkoman Foods Europe Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Athanasia Baka EXPERT GROUP NEW!
ALLERGENICITY AND PROCESSING


Objective
This activity will evaluate the impact of different processing conditions on the allergenicity of
proteins and/or foods. This work aims to improve the scientific understanding of food allergy
mechanisms.
Activity
The expert group will identify the most relevant allergens and/or allergenic foods in Europe,
from a prevalence, severity and potency points of view. The activity will link these allergens
with the most frequent processing conditions for heat and pH treatments. Then, the effect of
specific conditions, including food matrix effect, will be explored.
Expected Outcome
A framework will be developed that could guide risk assessors and managers to identify
whether the applied processing parameters are to be considered as a mitigating factor,
especially an aggravating factor, for a set of given allergens or allergenic foods.

Timeline

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Expert Group Members

Prof. Ian Kimber ─ Chair University of Manchester Dr Corinne Hérouet-Guicheney ─ University of Nebraska Dr Simon Flanagan Mondelēz International Dr Thomas Holzhauser Paul-Ehrlich-Institute Prof. Clare Mills* University of Manchester Dr Bert Pöpping Kikkoman Foods Europe Ms Sandra Tuijtelaars* European Commission/DG Research Dr Kitty Verhoeckx TNO Quality of Life Dr Yvonne Vissers Prof. Harry Wichers Wageningen University Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer
EXPERT GROUP
PRIORITISATION OF ALLERGENIC FOODS WITH RESPECT TO PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE


Objective
Since 2007, a series of expert groups have established the criteria for the classification of the
strength of evidence around allergenic foods and related reactions. This expert group will
develop a framework to prioritise allergens into categories according to their importance in
public health risk management.
Activity
Firstly, the parameters (e.g. potency, prevalence) of the framework have to be defined with a
clear method of individual grading. These grades can be used as the basis for ranking
allergenic foods relative to each other, as such quantifying and positioning the public health
relevance of an allergic food.
Expected Outcome
Once the framework is developed, a manuscript will be prepared for publication in a peer-
reviewed journal. This project will ultimately provide a framework to assess public health
relevance of different allergenic foods.
Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Expert Group Members
Mr Stefan Ronsmans ─ Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Geert Houben ─ Vice-Chair TNO Quality of Life Prof. Peter Burney Imperial College London Dr Chun-Han Chan Food Standards Agency Dr Anthony Dubois University Medical Centre Groningen Dr Rinke Klein Entink TNO Quality of Life Prof. Lynn Frewer Newcastle University Ms Magdalena Haponiuk* European Commission – DG Health and BE Dr Sue Hattersley Food Standards Agency – FSA Dr André Knulst University Medical Centre Utrecht Dr Antonella Muraro* European Academy of Allergy and Clinical FR Immunology Dr Marie-Claude Robert Ms Soultana Tatsika Prof. Stephen Taylor University of Nebraska Mr Frans Timmermans Nederlands Anafylaxis Netwerk - European NL Anaphylaxis Taskforce Prof. Margitta Worm Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer EXPERT GROUP
FROM THRESHOLDS TO ACTION LEVELS

Objective
Operational management of allergens still suffers from the lack of an agreed set of reference
values defining a tolerable level of risk. As a result, standards to which industry operates still
lack consistency. Population dose distributions for many regulated allergens have recently
been developed and risk models elaborated to estimate the population impact of defined
contamination patterns. These developments make it possible to set reference values for
these allergens which minimise the risk of allergic reactions. This expert group is seeking to
foster a consensus over the feasibility of defining and establishing these reference values
and identify knowledge gaps still to be addressed.
Activity
This expert group is developing a proposal for a consensus on quantitative action levels for
use in the management of allergenic foods. Clear, agreed and reasonable standards for
action levels will benefit allergic consumers as well as food manufacturers.


Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Outcome
Three papers addressing the following topics have been submitted for publication in a peer-
reviewed journal:
 Advances in the risk management of unintended presence of allergenic foods in manufactured food products – an overview;  Development and evolution of risk assessment for food allergens;  Translating reference doses into allergen management practice: challenges for
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr René Crevel ─ Chair Dr Joseph Baumert University of Nebraska Dr Yong Joo Chung Ms Magdalena Haponiuk* European Commission – DG Health and BE Consumers Dr Sue Hattersley Food Standards Agency (FSA) Dr Corinne Herouet-Guicheney TNO Quality of Life Prof. Jonathan Hourihane University College Cork Dr André Knulst University Medical Centre Utrecht Prof. Marek Kowalski Medical University of Lódz Prof. Alfonso Lampen Federal Institute for Risk Assessment Dr Charlotte Madsen Technical University of Denmark Dr Hubert Noteborn Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety NL Authority Prof. Nikolaos Papadopoulos University of Athens Dr Fabrice Peladan Mrs Frédérique Respondek Mr Stefan Ronsmans Coca-Cola Europe Prof. Stephen Taylor University of Nebraska Mr Frans Timmermans Nederlands Anafylaxis Netwerk – European NL Anaphylaxis Taskforce Scientific Advisor Prof. Margitta Worm University Clinic Charité Berlin Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
LATEST PUBLICATIONS
Y.J. Chung, et al. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 2012;64(2):315-323. J.H.M. van Bilsen, et al.Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 2011;60:281-289. C-H. Chan, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2011;1-26. M. Worms, et al.Allergy 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1398.9995.20140.02332.x. For more detailed information on the task force work programme and on iFAAM, please contact Ms Athanasia Baka at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology FOOD INTAKE METHODOLOGY TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
We are what we eat, but do we really know what is in our food and importantly how much of food are we actually ingesting? Assessing the exposure of individuals to the many different substances and agents in food (whether or not they are intended or unintentionally added) is a key component of any risk-benefit assessment for ensuring safe food for the consumer. The Food Intake Methodology Task Force reviews, evaluates and develops new methods for estimating intakes of nutrients, food additives, chemical and microbiological contaminants, and other substances in our food supply. The aim is to help improve our understanding of the quantity of such substances/agents in the diet and to develop more realistic intake and exposure estimates of what Europeans eat and, in doing so, ultimately contribute to more relevant nutrition recommendations and safety guidelines.  A recent article showed how retailers' fidelity cards can be used as a novel way of evaluating food colour intake. This article was shared with EFSA in response to their call for scientific data to support the re-evaluation of all food colours authorised under the EU legislation. A follow-up articl conducted an uncertainty analysis of the methodology and looked at improvements and potential extensions of use for such a scheme.  In 2012, GUIDEA (Guidance for Dietary Intake Exposure Assessment) successfully launched a a practical online guide for conducting intake and exposure assessments to substances in foods, such as migrates from packaging, nutrients and food additives. The ultimate goal is to encourage harmonisation of assessment practices.  The latest task force publication describes the history of the GUIDEA project and its main principles, and provides insight on future development in this area.  The task force organised a Continuing Education Course on on 1 September 2013, at Eurotox 2013. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Benjamin Smith – Chair Dr Neil Buck – Vice-Chair Dr Christian Baz Ajinomoto Europe Dr Alison Eldridge Dr Susanne Kettler Coca-Cola Europe Dr Laurent Le Bellego Dr Regina Oberdörfer PepsiCo International Dr Jürgen Schnabel Givaudan International Dr David Tennant* Food Chemical Risk Analysis Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Mr Roland Faludi * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP NEW!
ADEQUATE METHODOLOGIES FOR RECORDING FLUID AND WATER INTAKE AT POPULATION
LEVEL


Objective
Although a global issue, fluid intake is extremely topical at the moment in Europe in light of
EFSA initiatives to review their dietary exposure survey methodologies and gather new pan-
European data. The project aims to review and improve methodologies to accurately assess
water and fluid intake as this topic has received very little attention in national food surveys.
Activity
The expert group is looking at the current methodologies used in national surveys to capture
fluid and water intake. The next step will consist of reviewing the available data on the
various methodologies used for assessing fluid and water intake.
Expected Outcome
This activity aims at undertaking actions towards the establishment of a consensus that food
record methodologies are not adequate to accurately record fluids and water. The outcome
would be to propose investigations and guidelines for improving the fluid intake records in the
future. The output will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in a
workshop.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Laurent le Bellego ─ Chair Dr Karen Cunningham Coca-Cola Europe Scientific Advisor Prof. Jürgen König University of Vienna Mr Gabriel Tavoularis Dr Abby Thompson Scientific Advisor Mr Roland Faludi EXPERT GROUP
IDENTIFYING PRACTICAL WAYS OF DETERMINING UNCERTAINTIES IN FOOD INTAKE
ASSESSMENTS

Objective
Building on the GUIDEA initiative (see pageand, this expert group will describe the
uncertainties present in various intake assessments (such as misreporting of food
consumption) and classify these uncertainties to support more accurate food intake and
exposure assessments.
Activity
The expert group is reviewing and assessing existing data on methods available for
determining uncertainties, both at European and international levels. Case studies (e.g.
specific nutrients, food additives, smoke flavourings and pesticide residues) will be used to
discuss and provide examples of relevant uncertainties in specific assessment
methodologies and models used for a range of food components.
Expected Outcome
Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of uncertainties in food and food ingredients intake
assessments will be outlined. In addition, methods will be developed to characterise the
uncertainties for decision makers. The output will be discussed with stakeholders in a
workshop and then published in a peer-reviewed journal.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology
Timeline


Expert Group Members

Dr Suzanne Kettler ─ Chair
Coca-Cola Europe Dr Christian Baz Ajinomoto Europe The Food and Environment Research Dr Jürgen König University of Vienna Mr Cronan McNamara Dr Regina Oberdörfer Bayer CropScience BioScience Dr Jürgen Schnabel Dr Benjamin Smith Dr Corinne Sprong Dr David Tennant Food Chemical Risk Analysis Prof. Gregorio Varela - Moreiras Universidad CEU San Pablo Mr Roland Faludi EXPERT GROUP
GUIDEA: GUIDANCE FOR DIETARY INTAKE EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT


Objective
This activity is working towards producing a practical online guide for conducting intake and
exposure assessments. The goal is to encourage harmonisation of practices for determining
assessments, leading to better health recommendations.
Activity
The experts have developed a web-based databawhich provides a
centralised and comprehensive platform to share and discuss information and approaches
on the exposure assessment of individuals to substances in foods such as migrates from
food additives, nutrients, packaging and pesticides.
Outcome
This online resource aims to be a single, interactive source of reference covering all aspects
of the methods, principles and approaches to conduct and interprete dietary intake and
exposure assessments on the complete range of components in the diet. A recentwas
published in Food and Nutrition Sciences and gives a comprehensive overview of GUIDEA
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology
and the principles on which it was constructed. More information is provided in the
Timeline
The GUIDEA project is an ongoing project supported and led by the task force. Plans for the
long-term sustainability and growth of this activity are being investigated.
Expert Group Members

Dr. David Tennant ─ Chair Scientific Advisor Dr Veronika Ehrlich Scientific Advisor Dr Astrid Kruizinga TNO Quality of Life Dr Benjamin Smith Dr Corinne Sprong National Institute for Public Health and the Environment Environment – RIVM Dr Jeanne de Vries Wageningen University Mr Roland Faludi
LATEST PUBLICATIONS

J. Howlett, et al.Food and Nutrition Sciences 2013;(4):315-320. C. McNamara, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants: Part A 2011; (28):1636-1644. M. Sardi, et al.Food Additives and Contaminants 2010;(27):1507-1515. For more detailed information, please contact Mr Roland Faludi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Novel Foods and Nanotechnology NOVEL FOODS AND NANOTECHNOLOGY TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
New technologies including nanotechnology impact many aspects of food science, from how food is produced to packaging materials and the development of new ingredients with new functionalities. The Novel Foods and Nanotechnology Task Force has been leading edge in terms of developing the thinking behind the safety risk assessment approaches for novel foods (including biotechnology) over many years. As new technologies are being developed, both for safety assessment and for delivering benefits to foods, the task force considers and evaluates how risk assessment will need to be adapted in order to support future innovation in the food industry.  The task force has had a very significant impact over the last 19 years. Initially, the focus was on food biotechnology and the related challenges. The broader aspects of the safety assessment of novel foods have been addressed including specifically what is meant by ‘history of safe use' and how can be a valuable tool in the development of novel foods . More recently a step-wise, systematic and flexible framework was developed to carry out risk assessments of engineered nanomaterials that have applications in food .  Overall there have been 9 publications in peer-reviewed journals with the approaches widely used and cited in the development of regulatory approvals for novel foods in Europe but also the rest of the world.  FAO kindly invited ILSI Europe to present their nanotechnology-related activities at a seminar jointly organised with WHO in March 2012. The information provided by ILSI Europe was included in anon the initiatives and activities relevant to risk assessment and risk management of nanotechnologies in the food and agriculture sectors.  Two recent publications provide guidance to assess the safety of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in foo. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Novel Foods and Nanotechnology
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Paul Hepburn ─ Chair Prof. Andrew Cockburn* University of Newcastle Dr Anne Constable Mr Gareth Edwards* Scientific Advisor Mrs Jossie Garthoff Dr Brett Jeffery Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Dr Alessandro Chiodini * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP
NEW STRATEGIES FOR SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF (NOVEL) FOODS AND INGREDIENTS

Objective
The activity aims at developing a roadmap for potential development and application of
current and emerging technologies (in vitro testing methods, in silico models) for safety
assessments along the risks and the benefits continuum, including the application to practical
case studies.
Activity
In 2007, the US National Research Council (NRC) published the strategy and vision for
‘Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century' used in safey assessments in the food industry. The
strategy is to move away from the more traditional hazard characterisation approaches
(typically using laboratory animals) not only to new cellular and molecular methodologies but
also to a better understanding of human biological pathways and networks and how these
are affected by exposure to chemicals. It is anticipated that these approaches will improve
the quality and robustness of risk assessments for human health.
Expected Outcome
This activity is a unique opportunity to understand the strengths and weaknesses of new food
safety technologies. It will help identifying what are the technologies that best fit with set
requirements to perform safety assessments in the food industry. A roadmap and a few case
studies will illustrate how best to use these technologies. The outcome is meant to
consolidate your knowledge is the area. The results will be made available in a peer-
reviewed publication.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Novel Foods and Nanotechnology
Timeline
EXPERT GROUP MEMBERS
Prof. Bas Blaauboer – Chair Utrecht University Prof. Alan R. Boobis Imperial College Dr Bobbie Bradford Dr Anne Constable Dr Mardas Daneshian University of Konstanz Mr Gareth Edwards Scientific Advisor Dr Jossie Garthoff Dr Brett Jeffery University of Applied Sciences Dr Alessandro Chiodini
LATEST PUBLICATIONS

J. Howlett.ILSI Europe Report Series 2012;1-16. A. Cockburn, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology 2012;50:2224-2242. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Packaging Materials PACKAGING MATERIALS TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Can you imagine that European citizens waste on average 164 kg of packaging per person per year, of which more than two thirds are food packaging? There is a real challenge in finding a good balance between the benefits of packaging in terms of food safety and its impact on the environment. Moreover, recent improvements in food production and distribution have led to an increased sophistication of food packaging. A careful evaluation of food contact materials and their interactions with food is needed to ensure consumers' safety. The Packaging Materials Task Force identifies and addresses these food packaging issues.  Organised every 4 years and attended by more that 300 experts, theprovide a unique platform to discuss the science of the safety and quality of food packaging, supported by the most recent results of research studies presented as lectures or posters.  Regularly updated, the ILSI Europe Reports on Packaging Materials focus on the most common materials used in the whole value chain of the food packaging industry. They also address chemical, toxicological, legislative and environmental aspects. The latest report focuses on printing inks applied on the non-food contact surface of food packaging  Non-intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) in food packaging have been a recent focus of the debate surrounding food contact materials. That's why ILSI Europe is developing a guideline that will help to better understand and address how to deal with these undesired substances. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Packaging Materials
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Leonor Garcia – Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Monika Huber – Vice-Chair Mondelēz International Dr Marie-Hélène Bani-Estivals Dr Maurizio Bonuomo Barilla G&R Fratelli Dr Emma Bradley* The Food and Environment Research Dr Françoise Godts DuPont de Nemours Swiss Quality Testing Services – SQTS Dr Gabriele Pieper Tetra Pak Research Dr Stamatios Stamenitis Mr Peter van Herwijnen Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Mr Roland Faludi * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP
NON-INTENTIONALLY ADDED SUBSTANCES (NIAS) IN FOOD CONTACT MATERIALS


Objective
During the life cycle of food contact materials, unexpected and potentially harmful
substances may migrate from packaging materials into food products. The expert group aims
to produce a guidance on how to apply risk assessment principles to NIAS derived from food
contact materials.
Activity
The expert group grounds its activity on the obligations under the Good Manufacturing
Practices (GMP). The group is exploring new and existing tools for transferring and
exchanging information within the supply chain, but also tools predicting the occurrence of
NIAS. A guidance document on risk assessment is currently being developed. Stakeholders
will be consulted in a workshop in 2014 before publication of the document.
Expected outcome
The guideline will help better understand and address how to deal with NIAS. For example,
how to predict the formation of breakdown products (NIAS) from the chemical composition of
the food contact materials, from the technological processing and from the interaction with
food matrices.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Packaging Materials
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Sander Koster ─ Chair TNO Quality of Life Dr Marie Hélène Bani-Estivals Dr Maurizio Bonuomo Barilla G&R Fratelli The Food and Environment Research Prof. Marie-Christine Chagnon Université de Bourgogne Dr Leonor Garcia Coca-Cola Europe Dr Françoise Godts DuPont de Nemours Swiss Quality Testing Services - SQTS Dr Rüdiger Helling Saxon Institute for Public and Veterinary Health – LUA Dresden Prof. Perfecto Paseiro-Losada University of Santiago de Compostela Dr Gabriele Pieper Tetra Pak Research Dr Monique Rennen TNO Quality of life Prof. Thomas Simat Technical University of Dresden Mr Roland Faludi EXPERT GROUP
OUTLOOK AND CHALLENGES OF NANOTECHNOLOGIES FOR FOOD PACKAGING


Objective
Whilst most nanotechnology applications for the food sector are currently at R&D or near-
market stages, the applications for food packaging are rapidly becoming a commercial
reality. This expert group aims at reviewing potential benefits of nanotechnologies in food
packaging applications and potential challenges in terms of consumer acceptance, safety
and environmental impact during their entire life cycle. Migration and detection methods, risk
assessment and regulatory implications are also addressed.
Activity
The group drafted a guidance document on the new opportunities and safety considerations
of nanotechnologies in food packaging. A workshop was organised in February 2012 to gain
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Packaging Materials
stakeholders' viewpoints future directions of the technology and a way forward to deal with
the associated challenges.
Expected Outcome
This activity will provide an up-to-date overview of the use of nanomaterials in food contact
materials and the migration behaviour of the nanoparticles from these materials into foods.

Timeline


EXPERT GROUP MEMBERS

Dr Leonor Garcia ─ Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Michael Adams Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Dr Maurizio Avella Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Polimeri TUBITAK MRC Food Institute Dr Gabriele Pieper Tetra Pak Research Dr Monique Rennen TNO Quality of Life Prof. Jochen Weiss University of Hohenheim Mr Roland Faludi LATEST PUBLICATIONS
J. Dixon. ILSI Europe Report Series 2011;1-43. J. Sutter, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2011;1-32. For more detailed information, please contact Mr Roland Faludi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins PROCESS-RELATED COMPOUNDS AND NATURAL TOXINS
TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
In some circumstances, cooking techniques can create unintended contaminants. The Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins Task Force was established in response to the high-profile case of acrylamide contamination in the early 2000s. The task force designs and implements programs that help understand how these compounds are formed, improve how we detect and measure them. These programs give a reliable risk/benefit approach to determine how they may affect human health. Although its initial focus was on acrylamide, it has now a broader scope covering furan, MCPD (monochloropropane-1,2-diol) esters, masked mycotoxins and other process-formed compounds.  The task force was successful in developing a on the risk assessment of acrylamide formed during high temperature cooking processes. As an immediate impact, the framework was widely used to compare and rank mitigation measures and was put in perspective with beneficial aspects of heat processing applicable to other process-related compounds.  A workshop organised in 2011 on MCPD- and glycidyl-esters was a driving force in resolving analytical issues and helped gaining a better understanding of their metabolism and toxicological aspects across the different stakeholders. Peer-reviewed articles on analytics and formation of these compounds were published in Food Additives and Contaminants 2013 ).  The task force successfully supported the recent activity on masked mycotoxis and agricultural practices. The aim was to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. The resulting publication was one of the most accessed in March 2013 in .  The present focus is on establishing a framework on how to assess the effectiveness of mitigation measures on human exposure and ultimately on human health. The framework will be initially tested on a few very relevant case studies (fumonisins, methylmercury and furan). Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 The task force is currently developing a new activity proposal tackling challenges and opportunities to decontaminate mycotoxins by food processing. This activity is expected to start by the end of 2013. Recent evidences suggest that some food production processes lead to the reduction of levels of mycotoxins in finished products compared to the corresponding raw materials. This research activity will aim at reviewing alternatives to optimise food processing in order to reduce mycotoxin contamination of food and feed, otherwise not suitable for human consumption. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Gabriele Scholz – Chair Prof. Gerhard Eisenbrand – Co-Chair* University of Kaiserslautern Ms Sue O'Hagan – Vice-Chair Pepsico International Dr Adina Creanga Dr Richard DePalma Mr Helmut Günther Mondelēz International Dr Brett Jeffery Dr Gunhild Kozianowski Südzucker/BENEO Group Mr Yves Le Bail-Collet Dr Gloria Pellegrino Dr Masao Shimizu Kikkoman Foods Europe Dr Gerrit Speijers Scientific Advisor Dr Michele Suman Barilla G&R Fratelli Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Dr Alessandro Chiodini * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP
DETERMINATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIETARY EXPOSURE REDUCTION MEASURES

ON HUMAN HEALTH

Objective
Over the last decades, risk assessment models and methods have significantly improved.
New developments are still needed in measuring effectiveness of exposure mitigation, or in
determining potential increase in exposure upon accidental pollution or changed patterns of
consumption. The activity aims at identifying key criteria to assess the impact of control
measures on exposure and health.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins
Activity
The activity is carried out in two phases. Phase 1 identifies the key criteria and approaches
to assess the impact of control measures on dietary exposure. The resulting framework will
capture what methodologies are applicable. Case studies cover Fusarium mycotoxins (ZON),
deoxynivalenol (DON), furan and methyl mercury in fish. Phase 2 will address how to
translate the change in exposure into a health impact.
Expected Outcome
The outcome of the activity will examine how to determine mitigation effectiveness on dietary
exposure, both retrospectively and prospectively. This could be useful for food safety experts
in the food industry, exposure assessment experts, risk managers in regulatory agencies and
policy makers concerned with dietary exposure to undesirable substances. It will result in a
peer-reviewed publication.
Timeline
Q4 2014 - Q1 2015
Expert Group Members

Dr Sue O'Hagan ─ Chair PesiCo International Prof Simon Edwards Harper Adams University College The Food and Environment Research Mr Cian O'Mahony Dr Gabriele Scholz Prof. Pablo Steinberg Hannover University Dr David Tennant Food Chemical Risk Analysis Dr Ine van der Fels-Klerx RIKILT - Institute of Food Safety Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins
EXPERT GROUP
REVIEW ON ANALYTICAL METHODS TO DETERMINE 3-MCPD ESTERS IN FOOD PRODUCTS

This activity has been conducted in collaboration with the Risk Assessment of Chemicals in
Food Task Force that was discontinued at the end of 2012.
Objective
3-MCPD has been shown genotoxic in several in vitro assays but not genotoxic or mutagenic
in vivo. There is a need for further research on MCPD- and glycidyl-esters, especially for the
development of validated analytical methods. The activity aimed at reviewing current
knowledge on analytical methods (direct and indirect) to determine MCPD- and glycidyl-
esters in food products. More specifically the expert group highlighted whether these are
valid for addressing key issues such as risk assessment and mitigation.

Activity
Analytical methods for determination of MCPD- and glycidyl-esters have advanced
considerably in recent years. Thus an expert group initiated a critical review of these
methods in the context of their performance and applicability to address key issues such as
occurrence of these compounds in food, mechanism of formation, mitigation and toxicology.
The expert group prepared a working document that was presented and critically discussed
at a workshop in November 2011. Available information on analytical methods were
reviewed, creating an inventory of direct and indirect methods, highlighting strengths and
weaknesses for each method.
Outcome
The evolution and performance of the different methods, both direct and indirect, was
described and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. In addition, the
metabolism and fate of MCPD- and glycidyl- esters in biological systems and the methods
used to study these in body tissues studies were illustrated. Compilation of data on analytical
methods and mitigation measures were published in Food Additives and Contaminants as
two articland.
Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins
EXPERT GROUP 1 MEMBERS
Dr Walburga Seefelder/ Dr Gabriele Scholz – Chair The Food and Environment Research Dr Karel Hrncirik Prof. Alfonso Lampen Federal Institute for Risk Assessment Dr Rüdiger Weisshaar Chemical and Veterinary Research Centre Dr Thomas Wenzl* European Commission – General Joint Dr Alessandro Chiodini *Observer EXPERT GROUP 2 MEMBERS
Dr Michael Granvogl German Institute for Food Chemicals (DFA) Dr Alessandro Chiodini LATEST PUBLICATIONS
B.D. Craft, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):46-51. C. Crews, et al.Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):11-45. F. Berthiller, et al.Molecular Nutrition and Food Research 2013;57(1):165-186. C. Crews.–ILSI Europe Report Series 2012;1-24. G. Speijers, et al.ILSI Europe Report Series 2010;1-48. M. van Boekel, et al.Molecular Nutrition and Food Research 2010;54:1215-1247. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology RISK ANALYSIS IN FOOD MICROBIOLOGY TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
The Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology Task Force strives towards a safer and higher quality of foods. The task force contributes to the harmonisation of microbiological risk assessment by publishing guidelines and by working on an agreed terminology. The task force is also developing tools to manage safety hazards and risks in food production systems.  The task force is especially well-known for its reference documents and training tools, like the Concise Monograph on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) which has been translated into 7 languages and is widely used by industry and academia.  Another publication is the which, through consideration of the tools and frameworks, has assisted those involved in the food production to better manage food safety (Crossley et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2011).  The task force recently published two articles in Food Control on the impact of microbial distributions on food safety. The focuses on the factors influencing microbial distributions and modelling (e.g. spatial and frequencies distributions) . The addresses how to quantify the impacts of microbial distributions in foods on public health .  In 2011, theon ‘Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) – Application of Omics Technology' provided a forum for omics experts and risk assessors to discuss omics technologies and data, as applied to risk analysis and risk management. An summarising the proceedings of the workshop was published in Trends in Food Science and Technology journal . The article outlines a brief introduction to the types of data being generated by omics technologies. Additionally, it presents the framework of MRA and highlights the challenges of applying omics data in MRA. UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 The Industrial Microbiological Risk Assessment Expert Group plans to produce guidelines for the dairy sector once the publication on fresh produce is completed. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Bizhan Pourkomailian – Chair McDonald's Europe Prof. Marcel Zwietering – Co-Chair* Wageningen University Dr Christophe Dufour Institut Mérieux Mrs Begüm Mutus Dr Yvonne Stedman Dr Anett Winkler Mondelēz International Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP NEW!
INDUSTRIAL MICROBIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT (MRA)

Objective
There is a lack of practical and applicable data and guidelines to perform Microbiological
Risk Assessment (MRA). The information that currently exists in the public domain is highly
theoretical and very generic; application to each industry sector can be difficult. The activity
aims to provide easy-to-follow and practical MRA recommendations specific to industry
sectors and guidance on implementation of risk assessment strategies within companies.
Activity
Existing risk assessment tools will be used to develop a series of publications directed
towards each food sector explaining the different approaches to MRA with examples. This
guidance would help the reader gain an understanding and apply risk assessment to the
sector in focus. The first in the series would aim to address the fresh produce industry.
Expected Outcome
A series of publications will support a wide range of industry sectors (e.g. fresh produce,
ready to eat meat, meat, poultry, fish, seafood, and dairy) in understanding and applying risk
assessment to their specific processes. The use of these publications would thereby result in
safer food for the consumer.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Bizhan Pourkomailian – Chair McDonald's Europe Dr Jean-Christophe Augustin ENVA - Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d´Alfort Scientific Advisor Dr Christophe Dufour Institut Mérieux Harper Adams University Prof. Marcel Zwietering Wageningen University Ms Marie Latulippe * Scientific Advisor
EXPERT GROUP NEW!
HISTORY-BASED PERFORMANCE OF THE HACCP CONTROL SYSTEMS TO VERIFY THE
EFFECTIVENESS OF FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT


Objective
The project is meant to continue a long-term change in food safety management. It will
provide food industry and regulatory food microbiologists, hygienists and furthermore the
scientific food microbiology community with scientific bases for better setting, harmonisation
and implementation of new tools in food safety management and development of the related
regulatory policies.
Activity
Food safety control is going more and more from end-product testing to management and
control. Example of longer term process control sampling with reduction of frequency already
exists in the EU legislation (EU1441-2007). If a similar approach would be applied for other
food processes, the reduction in sampling could contribute to cost savings, without
compromising on the safety of products.
Expected Outcome
This expert group will provide approaches/procedures/tools that, based on past performance,
demonstrate the effectiveness of prerequisite programs and of the hazard control system at
different steps of the food production process.

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology
Timeline

Expert Group Members
Dr Mats Peterz – Chair
Dr Dario De Medici National Institute of Health Dr Christophe Dufour Institut Mérieux Dr Liesbeth Jacxsens University of Ghent Ms Jeanne-Marie Membré INRA, UMR1014 Secalim Dr Marteen Nauta Technical University of Denmark – Prof. Marcel Zwietering Wageningen University Ms Marie Latulippe LATEST PUBLICATIONS
I. Jongenburger, et al.Food Control 2012;26:601-609. I. Jongenburger, et al.Food Control 2012;26:546-554. S. Brul, et al.Trends in Food Science & Technology 2012;27(1):12-24. D. Bean, et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2012;1-40. J. Bassett, et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2012;1-40. S.J. Crossley, et alILSI Europe Report Series 2011;1-26. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Threshold of Toxicological Concern THRESHOLD OF TOXICOLOGICAL CONCERN TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
In 1995, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced the Threshold of Regulation (ToR) program, according to which, at sufficiently low enough exposure, the associated risk related to the consumption of substances used in food contact articles equipment) may be deemed negligible. Derived from the ToR, the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept is a pragmatic but conservative science-based tool to help regulators and industry assess potential health risk from substances when specific toxicological data are not yet available. Since 1996, ILSI Europe has played a major role in promoting a broad application of the TTC concept in Europe. The scientific approach of the TTC concept was recognised by the scientific committees of international authorities, which released favourable opinions on the use of TTC as risk assessment tool. The use of the TTC principle enables to:  Recognise that exposures lower than the TTC levels do not pose safety concerns;  Decrease the use of laboratory animals;  Better use financial and human resources in both industry and governments;  Apply a practical risk assessment tool correlated to more and more sensitive analytical techniques.  The task force organised the workshop ‘Evaluation of the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) – Challenges and Approaches' aiming to assess the adequacy and fitness for purpose of the TTC approach and the potential for future modifications of critical aspects. The conclusions of the discussions are reflected in a report published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology .  The task force is partner in the European Commission funded proj The project aims to apply the current TTC approach to cosmetic ingredients (see page  The task force participated at with a session on ‘Advances in the application of the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) as a pragmatic risk assessment tool for cosmetics'. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Threshold of Toxicological Concern
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Heli Miriam Hollnagel – Chair Dr Susan Felter – Vice-Chair Procter & Gamble Dr Pierre-Jacques Ferret Pierre Fabre Dermo-Cosmétique Dr Leonor García Coca-Cola Europe Dr Elena Lo Piparo Prof. em. Andy Renwick* University of Southampton Dr Jürgen Schnabel Givaudan International Dr Günna Würtzen Advisor for Coca-Cola Europe Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Dr Alessandro Chiodini * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP
IS THE 0.15 µG/DAY TIER OF THE THRESHOLD OF TOXICOLOGICAL CONCERN (TTC) STILL
APPROPRIATE?


Objective
The TTC-based exposure limit of 0.15 µg/day grounds on an evaluation of the Cancer
Potency Database (CPDB) that includes information from carcinogenicity studies of over 700
chemicals. This new expert group will establish if the TTC exposure limit of 0.15 µg/day for
DNA-reactive substances is still adequate by including in the evaluation the mode of action
(e.g. mutagenic or not) and new knowledge on human relevance (e.g. from findings in rodent
bioassays).
Activity
The expert group will re-evaluate the cancer TTC dataset by providing state of the art
scientific background support to the calculation of the 0.15 µg/day value. This work might
also lead to support for more than one TTC limit based on considerations such as mode of
action or chemical class.
Expected outcome
In addition to strengthening the scientific underpinnings of the cancer-based TTC tier, this
project will publish a peer-reviewed article and provide a publically available version of the
cancer potency database in a searchable format. The evaluation of the database may
depend on data availability, thus lengthening the finalisation of the project.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Threshold of Toxicological Concern
Timeline
Q3 2013 – Q4 2014
Expert Group Members

Prof. Alan Boobis Imperial College London Prof. Paul Brown Food and Drug Administration Prof. Mark Cronin Liverpool John Moores University Dr Manuel Dominguez Estevez European Chemicals Agency Mr James Edwards Food and Drug Administration – US FDA Prof. Corrado Lodovico Galli University of Milan Prof. Jay Goodman Michigan State University Dr Mirjam Luijten Leicester Royal Infirmary USEPA Office of Research & Development The Ohio State University Dr Alessandro Chiodini EU-PROJECT
COSMOS

ILSI Europe is a partner of the EU-funded project COSMOS. In this project, the task force contributes via 2 expert groups:  Criteria to apply the TTC approach to cosmetic ingredients;  Evaluation of oral-to-dermal extrapolation. More detailed information on the work and results of these 2 expert groups is provided on pages LATEST PUBLICATIONS
I. Dewhurst and A.G. Renwick.Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 2013;(1):168-177. S. Koster, et al.Food and Chemical Toxicology 2011;49:1643-1660. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 New Food Safety Task Force Proposals NEW FOOD SAFETY TASK FORCE PROPOSALS
BACKGROUND
In order to define ILSI Europe's future role in the moving field of food safety, a workshop entitled ‘New horizons in chemical risk assessment — Re-shaping ILSI Europe's food safety programme', took place on 16 October 2013 in Brussels. Member companies of ILSI Europe as well as potential members from the food industry attended with interest this event. The workshop aimed to identify and prioritise the most relevant emerging issues in food safety. In order to achieve this goal, participants were invited to submit topics in advance, to be further analysed and discussed at the workshop. At the workshop these suggested potential topics were analysed in depth and then prioritized. NEW TASK FORCE PROPOSAL
Follow up to the former EU project BRAFO (Risk-Benefit Analysis of Foods): Risk /
Benefit assessment for plant extracts, micronutrients and supplements
A new task force should be dedicated to risk/benefit assessment. The new task force would
also cover a comparison of bioavailability and effectiveness of a compound in isolated form
with those when ingested in the natural food context.
NEW TASK FORCE PROPOSAL
Changes in approaches to chemical risk assessment due to emerging methods in
toxicity testing
A new task force would focus on chemical risk assessment. Topics that might be addressed,
include how to incorporate in vitro / MoA data into normal risk assessment. Another topic of
interest is the potential change in the steady state background of DNA lesions in human
tissues/ white blood cells due to a given nutritional exposure by a genotoxic agent. Novel
technologies in risk/safety assessment could also be discussed, such as a case study on
genotoxic agents with low MoE.
NEXT STEP
As next step the new task force proposals will be developed and submitted to the ILSI Europe Scientific Advisory Committee and Board of Directors for scientific review and approval. For or Mr Roland Faludi at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities



Nutrition Task Forces
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Dietary Carbohydrates DIETARY CARBOHYDRATES TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Carbohydrates, which represent a large proportion of dietary energy intake, have the potential for significant health impact across populations. The Dietary Carbohydrates Task Force focuses on understanding the links between carbohydrates and health, particularly, to what degree glycaemia should be controlled, and what types and quantities of fibres should be consumed to optimise health.  Since its inception through 2012, the task force has produced a series of papers clarifying what existing science tells us about glycaemia and long-term health.  Regarding fibre, the 2008 FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius definition leaves open questions on the degrees of polymerization and physiological effects of fibres. Via scientific sessions and publications, the task force informs the scientific community on the health impact of these characteristics for various fibre types.  The task force is unique in its global collaborations to address harmonized implementation of the Codex fibre definition. For example, a session at the Vahouny 2010 conference was organised and a survey was conducted on the factors relevant in the harmonization of the Codex fibre definition. Results were published i  The peer-reviewed paper (Blaak et al. Obesity Reviews 2012) addresses the role of postprandial metabolism in healthy people, the relationships between postprandial glycaemia and specific health outcomes (e.g. obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases). Physiological relevance of biomarker changes are also covered. From the study, the need for more carefully designed Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) was evident. Results were presented in a poster session at the 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN) in Granada, September 2013. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Dietary Carbohydrates UPCOMING ACTIVITIES
The task force is currently considering three activity proposals.  The first will examine the role of sweetness in selection of a nutritionally sound diet using systematic review methodology.  The second project aims to review available markers for long-term glycaemic control, to identify and validate a marker beyond the well-accepted HbA1c.  The third project will review and analyse the processes underlying establishment of international dietary recommendations for carbohydrate intake, with the objective to optimise future methods of guideline development for this and other nutrients. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Ms Ellie Hadjilucas – Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Sophie Vinoy – Vice-Chair Mondelēz International Dr Douwina Bosscher Dr Paola Carnevali Barilla G&R Fratelli Mr Markus Hartwig Dr Toine Hulshof Dr Undine Lehmann Dr Thierry Naeye Dr Victoria Betteridge Dr Christine Pelkman Ingredion Incorporated Dr Frédérique Respondek Ms Fiona Samuels Dr Julian Stowell DuPont Nutrition and Health Dr Stephan Theis Südzucker/BENEO Group Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Dietary Carbohydrates
EXPERT GROUP
QUANTIFYING THE HEALTH IMPACT OF REDUCED POST-PRANDIAL GLYCAEMIA


Objective
There is a general consensus that reductions in post-prandial glycaemic (PPG) and relative
insulinaemic (PPI) responses are likely to be beneficial for reducing the risks of several
chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes or cardiovascular diseases) in the general population. It
should be possible to estimate quantitatively the health impact of reducing PPG and PPI
through diet.
Activity
The expert group is reviewing the types of data available to support this exercise. This
includes chronic PPG/PPI data linked to disease endpoints, nutrition and pharmaceutical
interventions (using acarbose and α-glucosidase inhibitors), and two-hour PPG effects of a
known intervention, all in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes, and in healthy
individuals.
Expected Outcome
The outcome will clarify the impact of PPG and PPI in terms of quantitative risk reduction in
the general population (a public health approach). It will also allow for differentiating the
potential effects of food from pharmaceutical treatment of diagnosed individuals.
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Prof. Jacqueline Dekker ─ Chair Vrije Universiteit Medical Centre Prof. Ellen Blaak Maastricht University Dr Toine Hulshof Prof. Martine Laville University of Lyon Mondelēz International Ms Marie Latulippe Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Dietary Carbohydrates
EXPERT GROUP
IMPACT OF POST-PRANDIAL GLYCAEMIA ON HEALTH AND DISEASE


Objective
Post-prandial glycaemia (PPG), together with related hyperinsulinemia and lipidaemia, have
been implicated in the development of chronic metabolic diseases including obesity, type-2
diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This activity investigates whether the physiological
effects found in people with impaired glucose metabolism (e.g. people with diabetes) also
occur in ‘healthy' individuals.
Activity
Disease states covered in this review include: oxidative stress and inflammation modulation,
diabetes and insulin resistance prevention, cardiovascular disease prevention, weight
management, physical performance and mental performance/cognition. The characterisation
of the glycaemic response, description of the food or meal composition and other factors
related to study methodology were evaluated, as well as the overall extent of evidence.
Outcome
Theserves as a comprehensive expert
evaluation of current knowledge on PPG and disease, and is a starting point for future
research. It is clear that additional randomized controlled trials using effective low vs. high
glucose response diets are necessary to draw more definitive conclusions on the role of
PPG. This work was presented as a poster at the 20th International Congress of Nutrition
(ICN) 2013.
Timeline

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Dietary Carbohydrates
Expert Group Members

Prof. Ellen Blaak – Chair Maastricht University Dr Jean-Michel Antoine Prof. David Benton University of Wales Swansea Prof. Inger Björck University of Lund Maastricht University Prof. Michaela Diamant VU University Medical Center (VUMC) Prof. Louise Dye University of Leeds Ms Ellie Hadjilucas Coca-Cola Europe Dr Jens Juul Holst University of Copenhagen Dr Toine Hulshof Prof. Martine Laville University of Lyon University of Leeds Dr Angela Rivellese Frederico II University of Naples Dr Stephan Theis Südzucker/BENEO Group Mondelēz International Ms Marie Latulippe LATEST PUBLICATIONS
E. Blaak, et al.Obesity Reviews 2012;13(10):923-984. M. Sadler.ILSI Europe Concise Monograph Series 2011;1-30. J.F. Howlett, et al.Food and Nutrition Research 2010;54:5750 - DOI: 10.3402/fnr.v54i0.5750. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance EATING BEHAVIOUR AND ENERGY BALANCE TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Food companies provide guidance and products to help consumers with appetite control and energy balance. What do consumers expect from health claims in this area, and how do they perceive them? What are the current methodologies for substantiating appetite control effects of foods, and benefits of these effects? These are some of the questions addressed by the Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance Task Force. The task force has generated a wider understanding of satiety benefits, and appropriate methods for their substantiation and communication to consumers. The task force members have also provided scientific input to regulatory consultations on the criteria for evaluation of claims in the areas of appetite and weight management.  The relevance of selected biomarkers as representative markers of appetite regulation has been comprehensively reviewed and was cited 51 times within 2 years of publication.  A paper detailing standards for testing and substantiation of appetite-related claims for foods and ingredients has been cited 81 times within 2 years of its publication. It is increasingly seen as the authoritative basis for regulatory guidance and academic and industry research in this field.  A conference report has just been published in thedescribing the proceeding of the workshop onthat took place in Brussels, 27 November 2012. It concluded that consumers may benefit from satiety enhancement in a number of different ways. Research indicates that most consumers understand that such claims do not provide a single, simple solution to weight management. Responsible communication of satiety benefits, backed by evidence from well-controlled scientific studies, is needed to optimise satiety functionality and claims.  A recent publication describes and evaluates the potential benefits of enhanced satiety . It concluded that levels of evidence vary for different specific benefits but overall indicate the benefit of satiety enhancement from foods incorporated into the diet.  The task force's work showed that there is likely to be a relatively low level of consumer misinterpretation of satiety-related claims on food products Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 The next activity under review focuses on physical and chemical properties of dietary fibre relevant to appetite-related mechanisms and outcomes. This activity will improve the ability to assess and predict effects of specific fibres, and help harmonise future studies. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr David Mela – Chair Dr Karen Cunningham – Vice-Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Douwina Bosscher Ms Denisse Colindres-Duron Dr Alfrun Erkner Dr Sophie Kergoat Dr Diederick Meyer Prof. Colette Shortt McNeil Nutritionals Dr Kirsti Tiihonen DuPont Nutrition and Health Mondelēz International Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Athanasia Baka EXPERT GROUP
THE NUTRITIONAL IMPACTS OF REDUCED-ENERGY SWEETENER USE: WHAT IS THE WEIGHT

OF EVIDENCE?

Objective
There is an increased use of products formulated with reduced-energy sweeteners aiming to
meet dietary guidance and consumer desires. While some epidemiological and animal data
have suggested that sweetener usage could increase risks of weight gain, human
intervention studies typically find either no effect or decreased energy intake and weight
status. There is an evident lack of expert consensus in this area.
Activity
This expert group is carrying out an assessment of key hypotheses based on a systematic
review of evidence on the nutritional impacts of reduced-energy sweetener use. This activity
will identify where possible the factors explaining why contradictory outcomes may occur.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance
Expected Outcome
This project aims to provide a consensus statement on the nutritional impacts of reduced-
energy sweetener use, what the current evidence is telling us and what the uncertainties are
in that evidence.
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Prof. Peter Rogers ─ Chair University of Bristol Dr Douwina Bosscher Dr Karen Cunningham Coca-Cola Europe Prof. Kees de Graaf Wageningen University Dr Suzanne Higgs University of Birmingham Dr Pleunie Hogenkamp Uppsala University University of Bristol Dr Martin Yeomans University of Sussex Ms Athanasia Baka LATEST PUBLICATIONS
S. Griffioen-Roose, et al.Nutrition Bulletin 2013;38:373-377. M.M. Hetherington, et al. Nutrition Research Reviews 2013;26(1):22-38. E. M. Bilman, et al. Appetite 2012;59(3):912–920. J. Blundell, et al. Obesity Reviews 2010;11(3):251-270. N. Delzenne, et al. Obesity Reviews 2010;11(3):234-250. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Athanasia Baka at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods FUNCTIONAL FOODS TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Specific components of the diet can bring benefits beyond those of basic nutrition. These beneficial effects are communicated to consumers via health claims on food products label. The Functional Foods Task Force develops tools for the scientific substantiation of benefits of foods on improvement and maintenance of health and wellness. In the context of food and nutrition, health and wellness are defined as the ability to adapt in order to feel well and perform your lifestyle today and in the future.  The European Commission funded projects FUFOSE and PASSCLAIM, coordinated by ILSI Europe, reached a consensus on scientific definitions and concepts of functional foods in Europe. These concepts were taken into considerations within the European Regulation on Health Claims implemented in 2006 (EC 1924/2006).  Following the first evaluation of health claims dossiers by EFSA, the task force looked into the quality of published results of human intervention studies. In 2011, it published for designing, conducting and reporting human intervention studies for the substantiation of health claims in the British Journal of Nutrition.  The task force just launched the final step (step 3, see figure on page of an interdisciplinary project on criteria for markers validation, namely the ILSI Europe Marker Validation Initiative in Nutrition Research. It aims at identifying and strengthening the scientific evidence behind the relationship between a marker and a health endpoint, required in the preparation of health claims dossiers. A first manuscript published in the European Journal of Nutrition, reviews the criteria for the evaluation of markers and identifies essential elements that are a important in the use of validated markers in nutrition research. The task force is also involved in two EU-funded projects:  aims at better understanding the potential benefits and mechanism of action of the selected bioactive compounds (docosahexaenoic acid, beta-glucan, and anthocyanins), considered as ingredients of the bioactive enriched foods, in the prevention of metabolic syndrome. ILSI Europe is leading the work on guidelines to assist SMEs for the substantiation of nutritional and health claims on bioactive enriched foods (see page Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods  aims at quantifying the effect of diet on "phenotypic flexibility". The use of specific -omics technologies will be evaluated within a human intervention study and then validated in a number of existing cohorts against established endpoints. ILSI Europe plays a key role in dissemination (see page UPCOMING ACTIVITIES
In order to identify new potential activities, the task force had a brainstorming meeting in July 2013. Two activities were considered relevant:  Explore the role of the major gut microbiota cluster on nutritional and functional benefits of nutrients and non-nutrients. The gut microbiota is involved in the modulation of the bio-availabilities and the functions of a large numbers of nutrients. Therefore, the gut microbiota is a key variable to take into account when managing obesity, inflammation and metabolic syndrome. This activity will aim at collecting and reviewing existing data on different gut microbiota clusters and at illustrating methodologies to correlate the composition of gut microbiota to some nutrition related non-communicable diseases (e.g. metabolic syndrome cardio vascular dieases).  Identification of preferred approaches for quantifying the impact of modifying nutrient intakes. There are widespread, established recommendations for populations to change their diets with the purpose of reducing risk of non-communicable diseases and also for food industries to modify the composition of manufactured foods. The impact of these changes needs to be carefully assessed. Therefore, this activity will aim to identify and illustrate preferred, practical model(s) (e.g. Quality-Adjusted Life Year – QALY, Disability-Adjusted Life Year – DALY) that could be recommended as standardized ways to estimate the quality of life/health impact of changes in the nutritional composition of foods. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Michele Kellerhals – Chair Coca-Cola Europe Dr Jean-Michel Antoine Ms Murielle Cazaubiel Institut Mérieux Dr Fabiola Dionisi PepsiCo International Dr Oliver Hasselwander DuPont Nutrition & Health Dr Thomas Hatzold Mondelēz International Ms Marianne Heer Dr Dominique Lacan Dr Diana Polacek Prof. Gerhard Rechkemmer* Max Rubner-Institute, Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food Dr Ricardo Rueda Mr Matthias Sass Dr Bert Schwitters The International Nutrition Company Prof. Colette Shortt McNeil Nutritionals Dr Stephan Theis Südzucker/BENEO Group Dr Sheila Wiseman Dr Renate Zwijsen Royal FrieslandCampina Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Dr Alessandro Chiodini * Scientific Advisor

EXPERT GROUP
MARKER VALIDATION INITIATIVE: DEVELOPING CONSENSUS ON CRITERIA TO EVALUATE
MARKERS IN NUTRITION RESEARCH

Objective
One of the main reasons why EFSA rejects many health claim dossiers is the lack of
supporting evidence based on validated markers to prove the potential health effect to be
claimed.
The aim of this transversal activity is to identify:  Consensus criteria for validation of markers in nutrition research;  Consensus markers to use in different fields of nutrition research. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods
Activity – Step 1 and 2
As a key milestone of the activity (step 1 and 2, see figure below), a workshop was organised
in June 2012 to establish a preliminary list of consensus criteria, available in literature and in
different fields of nutrition research. In order to be valid, markers should:
 Follow analytical rules;  Be validated according to recognised methods;  Reflect an endpoint: o Significant association between marker and endpoint in a target population; o Marker changes consistently with a change in the endpoint. To be usable in nutrition research, the
marker must furthermore respond to a
dietary intervention.
Activity – Step 3
The step 3 consists of a new expert group
that will refine and apply the consensus
criteria, agreed during the workshop in
2012, in different areas of nutrition
research. The aim is to provide more
granularity to the different consensus
criteria. In addition, an evidence-based
grading system will be introduced which
should enable weighing the relative
importance of individual criteria, thanks to
a quantitative score. This would provide
information about the usefulness/validity
of the current markers for a given
experimental situation. The same set of
information could be used as primary
guidance for the development of new
markers.
Expected Outcome
The expected outcome of the activity is a set of validated markers in different fields of
nutrition (e.g. mental performance, immunity).
For more information on this initiative, please visit our
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods
Timeline
Proposal for Step 3
EXPERT GROUP
MARKER VALIDATION INITIATIVE: APPROACH A, REVIEW OF EXISTING CRITERIA FOR
SELECTING MARKERS

Objective
The main objective of the review is to identify criteria for the evaluation of markers related to
nutrition, health and disease and to propose generic criteria for evaluation.
Activity
This review summarises the developments of marker evaluation in the medical and nutrition
sciences. Because in nutrition science no definition framework is available, it was decided to
use the definitions from the medical sciences. The majority of the papers in the medical area
on evaluation of markers cover prognostic and predictive markers and surrogate endpoints.
The applicability of the medical evaluation system approaches is presented with respect to
nutrition sciences.
Outcome
It is recognised that, in nutrition, a number of methodological aspects differ from medical
research. Therefore this review published in the European Journal of Nutrition resulted in a
database with definitions, criteria for validity and the rationale behind the criteria. It identifies
criteria as essential elements in the evaluation of marker.
Timeline

Expert Group Members
The composition of the expert group will be announced soon on our
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods
CONCISE MONOGRAPH
ANTIOXIDANTS AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AGENTS


Objective
ILSI Europe published a Concise Monograph on ‘Oxidants, Antioxidants and Disease
Prevention' in 1995. Given the significant developments since then, the task force is now
updating this monograph in order to include the latest scientific conclusions. The monograph
will provide a concise overview of the state-of-the-art relating to free radicals, antioxidants
and inflammation.
Activity
The monograph will describe basic mechanisms and theories on how inflammation and
oxidative stress may contribute to the genesis of diseases (e.g. cardiovascular,
neurodegenerative), and the roles of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents. It will also
investigate data from in vivo experiments (including human observation and intervention
studies, biomarkers) and describe the mechamism of actions in foods and food ingredients.
Expected Outcome
This updated Concise Monograph will be a reliable source of scientific information for the
broader scientific community and policy makers that would like to refurbish their knowledge
on the subject.
Timeline
Identification of Author 1st Draft Concise and 2 Scientific Editors Publication Committee Board of Directors
Editorial Team
Prof. Barry Halliwell
National University of Singapore Prof Philip Calder University of Southampton Dr Thomas Hatzold Mondelēz International Scientific Advisory Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Functional Foods
LATEST PUBLICATIONS
J. de Vries, et al. European Journal of Nutrition 2013. Published online: DOI:10.1007/s00394-013-0553-3. J.A. Schmitt, et al. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2012;66(12):1280-1281. S. Zimmer. European Journal of Nutrition 2012;51(Suppl.2):S9-S48. A.M. Gallagher, et al.British Journal of Nutrition 2011;106(2):S16-S28. R.W. Welch, et al.British Journal of Nutrition 2011;106(2):S4-S15. P.C.H. Hollman, et al.Journal of Nutrition 2011;141(5):989-1009. P. Aggett, et al. ILSI Europe Report Series 2010;1-24. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Metabolic Imprinting METABOLIC IMPRINTING TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
The next generation is expected to have a shorter life expectancy partly due to the obesity epidemic. Therefore, the Metabolic Imprinting Task Force is looking at obesity in the earliest stages of life. Metabolic imprinting refers to the effects of early life exposures (during pregnancy and infancy) on the development of chronic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. The task force's projects have identified key factors (both before and during pregnancy) contributing to childhood obesity. This work has produced expert recommendations on design of mother-child studies and on maximising the use of existing data by encouraging greater collaboration among research teams. Evidence-based public health campaigns can use this information to raise public awareness on the risk of obesity transmission. The task force work was presented at major conferences: the European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in 2009, 2010 and 2012, the World Congress on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) in 2009 and the Power of Programming in 2010.  This year, an overview of the task force's ongoing efforts towards developing science to support maternal and infant nutrition guidelines was presented at the 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN) in Granada, September 2013.  In November 2013, the findings of the expert group on cohort studi will be presented at DOHaD 2013. UPCOMING ACTIVITIES
 Potential activities in collaboration with other task forces that are currently under discussion include quantifying long-chain PUFA intake in pregnancy, lactation and early life, as well as developing the science base for nutrition guidelines for gestational diabetes.  In addition, the task force is interested in examining the potential long-term health implications of early bacterial colonisation and of early nutrition on brain development, as well as designing a ‘case-control study' to examine nutrient determinants in early life for childhood obesity and metabolic abnormalities. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Metabolic Imprinting 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Ricardo Rueda – Chair Abbott Nutrition Prof. Stewart Forsyth – Vice-Chair Dr Eurídice Castañeda Gutiérrez Dr Dianne Delsing Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Julie Davey Lund Dr Marieke Schoemaker Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Eline van der Beek Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP NEW!
EARLY GROWTH VELOCITY AND RISK OF METABOLIC DISORDERS LATER IN LIFE


Objective
Infants who have suffered a period of undernutrition tend to compensate and grow rapidly
once their nutritional conditions improve. Rapid growth early in life may increase the risk of
chronic diseases later in life. Experts will identify patterns of growth associated with disease
risk.

Activity
The activity involves evaluating the influence of growth velocity on metabolic imprinting, and
identifying the feeding patterns, biomarkers and other nutritional factors associated with this
accelerated growth in pre-term infants and infants of small weight for gestational age (babies
with a weight below the 10th percentile for the gestational age).
Expected outcome
The expert group plans to characterise the association between growth and later health. It
will provide recommendations for future clinical studies working on growth rates as well as
guidance on how to assess the role of nutrition in human studies.
Timeline

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Metabolic Imprinting Expert Group Members

Dr Ken Ong – Chair University of Cambridge Dr Eurídice Castañeda Gutiérrez – Dr Mary Fewtrell MRC Childhood Nutrition Prof. Stewart Forsyth Dr Keith Godfrey University of Southampton Dr Kathy Kennedy UCL Institute of Child Health Prof. Berthold Koletzko University of Munich Dr Ricardo Rueda Abbott Nutrition Dr Marieke Schoemaker Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Stef van Buuren University of Utrecht Dr Eline van der Beek Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP
LONG-TERM HEALTH OUTCOMES FROM EARLY LIFE NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTIONS

Objective
The expert group addressed the nutritional factors and mechanisms involved before and
during pregnancy that may influence the risk of child obesity. Factors critical in design of
cohort studies to better answer this question were examined.
Activity
A roundtable workshop with the principal investigators of European birth cohorts was
organised in October 2011. The workshop reviewed the key pathways, including nutrition,
leading to adverse pregnancy and childhood outcomes, particularly in obese pregnant
women.
Outcome
The publication by published in early
2013 identified prenatal risk factors including maternal diet, gestational weight gain and
metabolic perturbations during pregnancy. Postnatal diet and feeding practices along with
activity patterns and family lifestyle may also modify or determine the long-term health risks.
The paper will be presented at the 8th World Congress on Developmental Origins of Health
and Disease – DOHaD 2013.
Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Metabolic Imprinting Expert Group Members

Prof. Michael Symonds – Chair University of Nottingham Prof. Stewart Forsyth Dr Keith Godfrey University of Southampton Prof. Berthold Koletzko University of Munich Dr Katherine Macé Prof. Helle Margrete Meltzer Norwegian Institute of Public Health Prof. Lucilla Poston St Thomas' Hospital Dr Eline van der Beek Dr Petra Verhoef Ms Marie Latulippe LATEST PUBLICATIONS
M. Symonds et al. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 2013;62:137-145. B. Hanley, et al.British Journal of Nutrition 2011;104(Suppl.1):S1-S25. L. Poston et al.Pediatric Research 2011;69(2):175-180. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrient Requirements NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Most European countries set their own dietary recommendations. However, there is currently no standard approach and large differences exist across Europe, causing confusion among consumers, food producers and policy-makers. The Nutrient Requirements Task Force evaluates the scientific information on the nutritional requirements of different population groups, with a special focus on vulnerable populations.  The task force evaluates population nutrient intakes and their sources and assesses how nutrient intake affects nutrient status and related health outcomes. It thereby contributes to a broader understanding of the building blocks of nutrient recommendations. The outputs can serve EFSA and other nutrient recommendation setting bodies that are currently reviewing and updating the recommendations for energy, macro- and micronutrients.  The task force initiated and supported EURRECA, an EU-funded programme which developed a methodological framework for setting relevant practical tools for its application. This framework was discussed during a workshop organised by EURRECA and the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2012 with the participation of 26 EU countries, 4 non-EU countries and different NGOs (EFSA, UNICEF, FAO, DG Research and DG Health and Consumers of the European Commission). For more information, visit  The publication by revealed that there are few established adverse consequences of high intakes of digestible carbohydrate for young children. The greatest impact is on dental caries, although this is influenced by high intake frequency and poor oral hygiene.  The EURRECA final report describes the methodological aspects of the EURRECA framework and its practical application for six micronutrients (folate, iodine, iron, selenium, vitamin D and zinc). Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrient Requirements UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 An activity focusing on adequacies of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs intakes in European countries in light of the current recommendations is currently under review. The need for specific recommendations (absolute amounts and ratios) will be examined depending on the different desired health outcomes. This activity is planned to start in December 2013. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Mariska Dötsch-Klerk – Chair Dr Mathilde Fleith – Vice-Chair Dr Martine Alles Dr Marta Bianchi Barilla G&R Fratelli Mr Christophe Didion* European Commission – DG Health and Dr Szabolcs Péter Dr Anne Schaafsma Royal FrieslandCampina Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer EXPERT GROUP
ADEQUACY OF DIETARY FIBRE INTAKE OF THE EUROPEAN POPULATION WITH REFERENCE

TO BOTH TOTAL AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF FIBRE
Objective
The intake of total dietary fibre is not optimal in most European countries, in particular in
vulnerable groups such as children. Total dietary fibre is important for the maintenance of
good overall health and prevention of chronic diseases, whereas specific fibre types could be
recommended for their specific health benefits. The aim of this activity is to review the
existing data on total as well as specific types of fibre intakes across Europe, and compare it
with current recommendations.
Activity
The expert group is currently reviewing and assessing existing data on recommended and
actual intakes of (total and specific types of) fibre in Europe. Information will come from
nutrient-based recommendations and surveys measuring directly fibre intake. In addition,
modelling techniques will be used to estimate recommended and actual intakes of fibre from
food based dietary guidelines or surveys measuring food consumption, respectively.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrient Requirements
Expected Outcome
This work will result in a comprehensive review of the literature on dietary fibre intakes,
recommendations and sources. Areas where scientific data are lacking will be identified and
need for further research on total and specific types of fibre will also be highlighted.
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Victoria Burley ─ Chair University of Leeds Dr Marta Angela Bianchi ─ Vice-Chair Barilla G&R Fratelli Dr Martine Champ Dr Alison Lennox MRC Human Nutrition Research Ms Heddie Mejborn National Food Institute, Technical University DK of Denmark National Institute for Public Health & the NL Environment - RIVM Ms Athanasia Baka EXPERT GROUP
THE ROLE OF MENAQUINONES (VITAMIN K2) IN HUMAN HEALTH

This joint effort with the Addition of Nutrients Task Force also contributed to the Marker
Validation Initiative (see Functional Foods Task Force on pag
Objective
Beyond its classic role in coagulation, vitamin K takes part in the improvement of bone
health, and the reduction of vascular calcification and cardiovascular risk. Menaquinones,
also known as vitamin K2, could be more effective in these functions than phylloquinone, also
known as vitamin K1. However, present dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin K are
exclusively based on phylloquinone, and its function in coagulation. The main objective of
this activity is to review the need for specific DRVs for menaquinones.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrient Requirements
Activity
The expert group conducted a thorough review of existing literature on dietary menaquinones
and their role in human health. The activity evaluated whether unique recommendations for
menaquinone intake are justified at this time, and what additional information is needed to
have strong scientific underpinnings for establishing DRVs for menaquinones.
Outcome
This work resulted in a review paper . The
paper concluded that, although there are significant gaps in the current knowledge on
menaquinones based on the criteria for setting DRVs, there is merit for considering both
menaquinones and phylloquinone when developing future recommendations for vitamin K
intake.
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Cees Vermeer ─ Chair Maastricht University Dr Joline Beulens University of Utrecht Tufts University Dr Marjolijn Bragt Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Elisabeth Stoecklin Dr Ellen van den Heuvel Royal FrieslandCampina Ms Athanasia Baka LATEST PUBLICATIONS
J.W.J. Beulens, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;16:1-12. A. Stephen, et al. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2012;66:765-779. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Athanasia Baka at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Immunity in Man NUTRITION AND IMMUNITY IN MAN TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
significantly affect the immune system. The Nutrition and Immunity in Man Task Force focuses on determining reliable markers of immune functions, such as immuno-modulation and inflammation, relevant to health and well-being. Multiple expert groups have produced comprehensive peer-reviewed guidance documents on marker selection and interpretation. The use of common reliable markers in different studies facilitates data comparison and strengthens the body of knowledge in nutrition and immunity. This work is valuable for the design of nutrition interventions evaluating effects of foods and food components and using immune markers, being thus useful to researchers struggling to scientifically substantiate immune-related health effects.  The latest publication in focuses on immunomodulation. Building upon the successful it describes how to select markers for future trials and provides a framework for the interpretation of outcomes. This work was presented as a poster at 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN 2013) in Granada, September 2013. It has also been introduced at other global venues, including the International Immunonutrition Workshop 2012 (Spain), ISAPP 2012 (Ireland) and 2013 (New York), EAACI 2013 (Milan), Ganepão 2013 (Brazil), and Probiotics and their Applications 2013, Vietnam National Institute of Nutrition (Vietnam).  A number of inflammatory challenges reflecting metabolic stress, infection, and tissue damage have been described i Using multiple markers and dynamics of response is recommended and the application of standardized methods is outlined. This work was also presented at ICN 2013, as part of a session on biomarkers of nutrition interventions. UPCOMING ACTIVITY
The most recent publication of the task force advocates the use of the assessment of the immune response to vaccination as the most promising marker for determining immune system functionality. The task force may look into developing practical guidance on how a response to vaccination can be used as a marker. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Immunity in Man
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Raphaëlle Bourdet-Sicard – Chair Prof. Philip Calder – Co-Chair University of Southampton Dr Willem Vas Dias – Vice-Chair Merck Consumer Healthcare Dr Jalil Benyacoub Dr Deborah Braun Institut Mérieux Ms Lisa Dispensa Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Dr Martine Latta-Mahieu Sanofi-Aventis R&D Dr Bertrand Rodriguez Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP NEW!
LOW-GRADE INFLAMMATION IN AGEING: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

Objective
Low-grade inflammation (LGI) is characterised by levels of inflammatory markers slightly
above ‘normal'. LGI has been linked to several chronic adverse health conditions including
obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. It also occurs as a natural
consequence of ageing. This expert group has a unique focus on triggers of LGI: why LGI
begins, specifically in ageing, and what are the benefits or drawbacks for health? This topic
serves as a case-study for the initiation of LGI in other chronic disease states.
Activity
The first meeting enabled to brainstorm, narrow and better define the project scope,
considering available data. In conjunction with experts in gut microbiota, neurology and
inflammation in ageing, the task force has now planned an interdisciplinary and systemic
approach to the question. The review will cover microbial diversity in health and in ageing,
links between the gut-brain axis and inflammation, the concept of ‘inflammageing' and impact
on immunocompetence and emerging biomarkers and assessment tools.
Expected Outcome
This activity will provide an overview of status of knowledge related to the interlinking of
these concepts as well as future perspectives on understanding the process to optimise
health. It will serve as a basis for facilitating the design and interpretation of research and
providing support for health claims.

Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Immunity in Man
Expert Group Members
The composition of the expert group will be announced soon on our
EXPERT GROUP
SELECTING AND INTERPRETING MARKERS OF IMMUNOMODULATION IN NUTRITION STUDIES


Objective
Co-managed with the Probiotics Task Force, this activity provides expert guidance for the
selection and interpretation of immunomodulation markers applied in nutrition intervention
studies in the general population. The information is likewise applicable to probiotics which
modulate immune function via the gut.
Activity
It is generally accepted that nutrition influences immune function. Questions remain,
however, regarding how to most appropriately monitor such effects in a nutrition intervention
study. The expert group evaluated markers with a scoring system which involves criteria
covering biological relevance, biological sensitivity and feasibility of measurement.
Guidelines for the interpretation of marker modulation in the context of a nutrition study were
developed.
Outcome
The final review (Albers et al. British Journal of
Nutrition
2013) provides comprehensive guidance for the interpretation of future studies of
nutrition and immunity in the general population. These guidelines allow for further
modification when novel markers are identified. This expert guidance can be applied to
experimental design and interpretation to support immune benefits.

Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Immunity in Man
Expert Group Members
Prof. Ulrich Sack ─ Chair University of Leipzig Dr Phoukham Phothirath ─ Vice-Chair Scientific Advisor Dr Raphaëlle Bourdet-Sicard Prof. Philip Calder University of Southampton Dr Murielle Cazaubiel Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Claude Lambert Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Etienne FR Dr Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop IDF - ILSI Liaison Officer Dr Arthur Ouwehand Dr Tomoyoki Sako Prof. Seppo Salminen University of Turku Dr André Siemensma Royal FrieslandCampina Prof. Henk van Loveren National Institute of Public Health d the Environment – RIVM Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP
BIOMARKERS OF INFLAMMATION: GUIDANCE FOR NUTRITION INTERVENTION STUDIES

Objective
This activity aimed to identify robust and predictive markers for use in monitoring the
inflammatory response in human nutrition research, focusing on the healthy population.

Activity
The expert group produced a comprehensive guidance document on how to assess
inflammation through the evaluation of specific inflammatory markers in human nutrition
studies.

Outcome
Theper published in 2013 in the British Journal of Nutrition contributes to a
better understanding of the current limitations and opportunities for assessing inflammation
and can be used to improve the design and conduct of nutrition intervention studies. Given
the complexity of the inflammatory process, multiple instead of single markers and
application of standardized methods are outlined and recommended.
Timeline
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Immunity in Man EXPERT GROUP MEMBERS
Expert Group Members
Prof. Philip Calder ─ Chair
University of Southampton Dr Namanjeet Ahluwalia Université de Paris – INSERM Scientific Advisor Dr Raphaëlle Bourdet-Sicard Prof. Dirk Haller Technical University of Munich Prof. Stephen Holgate University of Southampton Dr Christine M'Rini Prof. Ascención Marcos Sánchez Federation of European Nutrition Societies - ES FENS Dr Judith Moreines Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Prof. Michael Müller Wageningen University Prof. Graham Pawelec University of Tubingen Dr Joost van Neerven Royal FrieslandCampina Prof. Bernhard Watzl Max Rubner-Institute (MRI) Ms Marie Latulippe LATEST PUBLICATIONS
R. Albers, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110(Suppl. 2):S1-S30. P.C. Calder, et al.British Journal of Nutrition 2013;109(Suppl.1):S1-S34. S. Gredel. ILSI Europe Concise Monograph Series 2011:1-32. Portuguese Version. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance NUTRITION AND MENTAL PERFORMANCE TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Food and nutrients can benefit brain functions. Great opportunities neurodevelopment and reduce risk of cognitive decline. In this developing field, the task force is focusing on the harmonization of research methodology.  The task force has produced elemental guidance for research in the field. Since the launch of the task force's 2008 long-term plan ‘Nutrition and brain function in the future', 5 peer-reviewed papers and supplements have been issued focusing on methodologies and assessment, and covering measurement of mental performance in different population groups: children, the elderly, and the general healthy population .  Projects have evolved with the field to delve into emerging techniques.  The latest publicatio in British Journal of Nutrition 2013 (with a summary in Advances in Nutrition, in press) covers a range of brain imaging modalities and how they are and can be used in nutrition interventions.  Expert group work is disseminated through presentations at scientific congresses, including at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Meeting (in collaboration with the American Society for Nutrition) and the 20th International Congress on Nutrition (ICN), Granada, both in 2013. UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 A broad but disjointed literature points that various diets or dietary components might protect against cognitive decline. The next project currently under review aims to pull together and evaluate the existing evidence related to neuroprotective diets and nutrients to determine the state-of-the-science related to nutrition and maintenance of optimal cognitive function. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr John Sijben – Chair Prof. Keith Wesnes – Co-Chair* Swinburne University of Technology Dr Siobhan Mitchell – Vice-Chair Dr Melanie Charron Soremartec Italia – Ferrero Group Dr Thomas Hatzold Mondelēz International Dr Marco Hoeksma Südzucker/BENEO Group Dr Sophie Kergoat Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Sanofi-Aventis R&D Dr Hasan Mohajeri Dr María Ramírez Abbott Nutrition Dr Caroline Saunders PepsiCo International Dr Berenike Stracke Dr Barbara Winters Campbell Soup Company Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP
MEASURING AND VALIDATING THE SUBJECTIVE EFFECTS OF FOOD ON MOOD AND MENTAL
PERFORMANCE


Objective
While subjective experience is a component of EFSA evaluations for health claims on
psychological function, self-report (a subjective measure) is not considered as a substantial
scientific measure for certain cognitive responses. This project aims to evaluate if validating
subjective measures are associated with a response of longer-term health relevance.
Activity
The experts will address differences between subjective and objective measures as related
to mental performance. They will cover several dimensions of mood, validity of the
measures, early detection of a meaningful health effect, impact of baseline status, meaning
of no detection of effect and best practices for tool selection and interpretation, among other
themes.

Expected Outcome
The review will propose the foundational principles for measuring the effects of food on mood
and subjective mental performance, and means by which subjective consumer perception
can be linked to longer-term, positive health outcomes, beyond mood itself.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Mark Hamer ─ Chair University College London Dr Marco Hoeksma – Vice-Chair Prof. Louise Dye University of Leeds Prof. Sophie Layé INRA Bordeaux University Dr Siobhan Mitchell Prof. Peter J. Rogers University of Bristol Dr Caroline Saunders PepsiCo International Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP
BRAIN IMAGING FOR EARLY DETECTION OF NUTRITION EFFECTS


Objective
This activity follows up on previous work identifying the need for methodological guidance.
Here, the expert group focuses on the use of various brain imaging techniques (e.g. MRI,
PET, SPECT) as diagnostic and/or early efficacy markers which predict the long-term effects
of nutrition on brain functioning.
Activity
The expert group conducted a comprehensive review of brain imaging techniques, including
the biological relevance of their measures, the practical feasibility and sensitivity with age
and in specific populations.

Outcome
The principal added value of brain imaging measures for human nutritional intervention
studies is their ability to provide unique in vivo information on the working mechanism of the
intervention in hypothesis-driven research. Recommendations for use of these techniques in
nutrition intervention studies are provided in this supplement published in the
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance
Timeline
September 2013-2014
Expert Group Members

Prof. Stéphane Sizonenko ─ Chair University of Geneva Dr John Sijben – Vice-Chair Prof. Claudio Babiloni University of Foggia Dr Eveline de Bruin Prof. Elizabeth Isaacs University College London Prof. David Kennedy University of Northumbria Dr Hasan Mohajeri Dr Judith Moreines Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Prof. Pietro Pietrini University of Pisa Medical School Prof. Kristine Walhovd University of Oslo Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP
TEST OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS

Objective
The concept of this activity was generated under the Marker Validation Initiative of ILSI
Europe (see pag. It reviews tests commonly used for assessment of mental health, their
state of validation, and their use in nutrition interventions.
Activity
The expert group completed a comprehensive review of cognitive tests covering how useful
they are for evaluating the impacts of foods and food components on cognition. Domains
covered include memory (verbal, visual, spatial, and spatial working memory), attention
(selective and sustained), information processing speed, executive function, and global
cognitive function.
Outcome
This review, accepted for publication in Nutrition Reviews, can serve as a background and
guidance document for nutritionists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, and neurologists
interested in assessing mental health in terms of cognitive test performance and for scientists
wishing to test the effects of food or food components on cognitive function.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Celeste de Jager ─ Chair
University of Oxford - OPTIMA Prof. Louise Dye – Vice-Chair University of Leeds Prof. Laurie Butler University of Reading Dr Eveline de Bruin Dr John Fletcher Prof. Jeremy Spencer University of Reading Prof. Keith Wesnes Swinburne University of Technology Ms Marie Latulippe LATEST PUBLICATIONS
S.V. Sizonenko, et al. British Journal of Nutrition August 2013;110(Suppl.1):S1-S30. Nutrition Reviews 2010;68(Suppl.1):S1-S580. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes OBESITY AND DIABETES TASK FORCE
(FORMER METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABETES TASK FORCE)
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Once considered a problem only in high income countries, overweight and obesity are now dramatically on the rise in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in urban settings (WHO 2013) and the worldwide prevalence of diabetes is growing accordingly, reaching epidemic proportions (IDF diabetes atlas 2011). The Obesity and Diabetes Task Force aims to:  Better understand and increase awareness of the mechanisms that underline the progression of type-2 diabetes, obesity and cardio-metabolic dysfunction;  Highlight the role of nutrition (including macronutrients, micronutrients, plant bio- actives and other ingredients) in the prevention and management of the above conditions;  Monitor evolving technologies and biomarkers, and assess their usefulness in human intervention studies to test the efficacy of, and substantiate health claims for, dietary components. A recent systematic review sets out the nature of chronic low-grade inflammation in the context of overweight and obesity, and describes the factors that might influence it, in particular those related to diet. Healthy eating patterns are associated with lower circulating concentrations of inflammatory markers. Among the components of a healthy diet, whole grains, vegetables and fruits, and fish are all associated with lower inflammation.  The workshop on took place on 15 September 2013, in Granada (ES). Organised in collaboration with ILSI Brazil, ILSI North America, ILSI Southeast Asia Region, and the ILSI Europe Metabolic Imprinting Task Force, the workshop focused on the effects of inflammation in health and disease, how inflammation may be assessed and modified by diet, and the use of inflammation as the basis for health claims. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 The task force is currently working on a proposal on nutritional management of gestational diabetes that will be submitted for approval (start date 2014). The objective of this new project is to provide evidence based recommendations for the practical implementation of nutrition advice in Europe for pregnant women with diabetes and women with gestational diabetes. 2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Mirian Lansink – Chair Prof. Anne Marie Minihane – Co-Chair* University of East Anglia (UEA) Dr Sophie Vinoy – Vice-Chair Mondelēz International Dr Christian Baz Ajinomoto Europe Ms Ellie Hadjilucas Coca-Cola Europe Dr Sampo Lahtinen DuPont Nutrition and Health Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Athanasia Baka * Scientific Advisor EXPERT GROUP NEW!
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE EFFICACY OF INTERVENTION IN THOSE WITH THE METABOLIC
SYNDROME


Objective
The objectives of this new project is to better understand the impact of single components of
the metabolic syndrome (i.e. low HDL-cholesterol, high blood presure, hyperglycemia/insulin
resistance, hypertriglyceridaemia and adiposity), their interactions and their potential
cumulative impact on disease risk. The expert group aims to establish an efficacy model for
food interventions.

Activity
An expert multi-disciplinary panel will review the relevant literature on associations between
metabolic syndrome and main related diseases. It will also identify any published methods
that assess the impact of treatment (drug or lifestyle) on multiple features of the metabolic
syndrome combined.

Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes
Expected Outcome
A ‘fit-for-purpose' model(s) will be developed to illustrate the impact of foods/food
extracts/supplements on the risk, presence or penetrance of the metabolic syndrome. This
outcome will be published in an peer-reviewed journal.

Timeline

Expert Group Members
The composition of the expert group will be announced soon on our

WORKSHOP
LOW-GRADE INFLAMMATION: A HIGH-GRADE CHALLENGE
BIOMARKERS AND MODULATION BY DIETARY STRATEGIES

In collaboration with ILSI Brazil, ILSI North America, ILSI Southeast Asia Region, and
the ILSI Europe Metabolic Imprinting Task Force
15 September 2013, Granada, Spain
Objective
Inflammation is an essential component of the immune response. However, chronic low-
grade inflammation is being increasingly recognised as a pathological feature of numerous
common chronic diseases. For example, adipose tissue inflammation is a key determinant of
risk and progression of type-2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Numerous dietary
components (macronutrients, micronutrients and non-nutrient plant bio-actives) modulate
inflammatory status.
A took place on 15 September in Granada (ES) to provide a comprehensive
overview of the current knowledge on the effect of inflammation to health and disease, how
inflammation may be assessed and modified by diet, and the use of inflammation as the
basis for health claims.
Activity
Nine speakers discussed the challenges in this areas starting from addressing inflammation
in acute and chronic disease, looking into how diet can modulate inflammation and finally
how to translate the current research into public health benefit and novel products.
Outcome
The speakers provided clear take-home messages and the workshop provided a platform to
discuss with key stakeholders the challenges of low-grade inflammation and its importance
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes
as a pathological feature of numerous common chronic diseases. A peer-reviewed
publication covering the discussions is under preparation.
Timeline
Online registration Organising Committee 15 September 2013
Expert Group Members

Prof. Anne-Marie Minihane ─ Chair University of East Anglia Dr Sophie Vinoy ─ Co-Chair Mondelēz International Prof. Jean-Louis Bresson Prof. Philip Calder University of Southampton Prof. Massimo Massi Benedetti* University of Perugia Dr Wendy Russell University of Aberdeen Dr Katerina Vafeiadou University of Reading Ms Athanasia Baka * Observer EXPERT GROUP
NUTRITIONAL MANAGEMENT OF POST-PRANDIAL GLYCAEMIA

Objective
Maintaining normal blood glucose levels thanks to adequate diet is a strategic target in the
prevention and management of type-2 diabetes. To implement such an approach it is
essential to understand the effect(s) of food on glycaemic regulation and on the underlying
metabolic derangements.
Activity
This comprehensive review summarises the results from human dietary interventions
exploring the impact of dietary components on blood glucose levels. The major
macronutrients are included carbohydrate, protein and fat, micronutrient vitamins and
minerals, non-nutrient phytochemicals and additional foods including low-calorie sweeteners,
vinegar and alcohol.
Outcome
The review paper ‘Impact of diet composition on blood glucose regulation' has been
accepted for publication in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition (in press). This
review clearly shows that dietary components have significant and clinically relevant effects
on blood glucose modulation.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes This work was presented at the following events:  European Congress of Obesity (ECO) 2012 in Lyon (FR), May 2012 (oral  5th International Congress on Pre-diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome in Vienna (AT), April 2013 (poster);  31st International Symposium on Diabetes and Nutrition, Dubrovnik (HR), 27-30 June 2013 (oral presentation);  IUNS 20th International Congress of Nutrition, Granada (ES), September 2013
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Dr Wendy Russell ─ Chair University of Aberdeen Prof. Inger Björck University of Lund Prof. Nathalie Delzenne Université Catholique de Louvain Beckman Research Institute Prof. Helen R. Griffiths Aston University Ms Ellie Hadjilucas Coca-Cola Europe University of Lund Prof. Gabriele Riccardi "Federico II" University, Medical School Dr Sampo Lahtinen DuPont de Nemours Dr Mirian Lansink Prof. Massimo Massi-Benedetti International Diabetes Federation Prof. Hannu Mykkänen University of Eastern Finland Prof. Luc J.C. van Loon Maastricht University Mondelēz International Dr Martin O. Weickert University of Warwick Ms Athanasia Baka Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Obesity and Diabetes
LATEST PUBLICATIONS
W. Russell, et alCritical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition (In Press). P.C. Calder, et al.British Journal of Nutrition 2011;106(3):S5-S78. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Athanasia Baka at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 PREBIOTICS TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
A prebiotic is a food ingredient selectively stimulating growth of microbial species in the gut microbiota that confers health benefits to the host. This task force aims at better understanding how prebiotics work, in particular what functions are beneficial to consumers. The task force has put in place sound scientific foundations to substantiate health functions It addresses the following areas: immunity, inflammation, mineral absorption, colon cancer and finally energy homeostasis, satiety regulation and body weight gain.  The recent collaboration with the Probiotics Task Force led to a joint Concise Monograph which summarises the science and principles valid for prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics today. UPCOMING ACTIVITIES
The task force performed a literature search to identify new ideas for future research projects. According to the outcomes of the search, it was agreed to focus on a two-tier activity:  Human milk oligosaccharides and functional analogues (e.g. from different food  Understand the link between structure/function of microbiota and particular type of benefit areas in the gastro-intestinal tract and beyond (e.g. gut-brain axis, inflammation and allergy). The first tier will be further perused in a new expert group which will kick off by the end of 2013. The second tier could be developed in cooperation with other ILSI Europe task forces (e.g. Nutrition and Immunity Task Force, Addition of Nutrients Task Force, Nutrient Requirements Task Force and Probiotics Task Force). Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Bernd Stahl – Chair Prof. Kristin Verbeke – Co-Chair Gastrointestinal Disorders - Targid Dr Diederick Meyer – Vice-Chair Cosucra Groupe Warcoing Dr Catherine Lefranc Dr Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop* IDF-ILSI liaison officer Dr Alexandra Meynier Mondelēz International Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Christine Pelkman Ingredion Incorporated Ms Adeline Pierre DuPont Nutrition and Health Dr Frédérique Respondek Dr Florence Rochat Dr Stephan Theis Südzucker/BENEO Group Mead Johnson Nutrition Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Dr Alessandro Chiodini * Observer EXPERT GROUP
HEALTH BENEFITS OF PREBIOTICS, LOOKING AT MICROBIAL FERMENTATION AND
METABOLISM

Objective
So far prebiotics were mainly studied for their shifting effect in the microbial composition of
the gut microbiota. The nature of the prebiotics is also of high interest. Not only food
ingredients but also the metabolic products of the microbiota may play a key role as
prebiotics. However, an evaluation of the physiological effects of these microbial metabolites
is in many cases lacking. The expert group is addressing a new health benefit of prebiotics
on gastro-intestinal functions, namely the metabolism and fermentation by the gut microbiota.
Activity
The expert group will describe how to link changes of microbial fermentation and metabolism
to specific targets and physiological effects based on systematic topic-wise reviews.
Expected Outcome
Guidelines will consider what is (im)possible for scientific substantiation of this beneficial
effect. A peer-reviewed publication will highlight the microbial metabolism and fermentation
function of the gastro-intestinal tract contributing to gut health.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Prof. Kristin Verbeke – Chair Translational Research Center for Gastrointestinal Disorders - Targid Dr Annick Bernalier INRA - National Institute of Agricultural Prof. Alan Boobis Imperial College Prof. Christine Edwards University of Glasgow Prof. Michiel Kleerebezem Wageningen University Royal FrieslandCampina Prof. Jeroen Raes Vrije Universiteit Brussels Istituto Agrario San Michele all'Adige Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Alessandro Chiodini CONCISE MONOGRAPH
PROBIOTICS, PREBIOTICS AND THE GUT MICROBIOTA


Objective
The monograph aims at providing in a single document both
probiotic and prebiotic concepts (that the public often mixes up),
and at discussing the functions of the intestinal microbiota.
Activity
Facing the recent published data on pre- and probiotics and their impact on health, the task
force decided to join forces with the Probiotics Task Force to commission a Concise
Monograph. It contains science-based answers to questions on health benefits provided by
prebiotics and probiotics in dietary intervention studies.
Outcome
The challenge in nutritional sciences is not to tackle diseases with a pharmaceutical
approach, but rather to provide dietary solutions to maintain and support health and thereby
reduce the risk of diseases. Therefore, the monograph discusses the current abundant
scientific knowledge on prebiotics, probiotics and the intestinal microbiota, including the
resulting effects on the host. It is noteworthy that these ingredients can be readily
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
incorporated into a balanced diet and that there is a growing body of evidence for their
potential health benefits. It has been posted to the website of the International Scientific
Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and it has been disseminated to ILSI
branches. Distribution at global congresses is ongoing.
The Concise Monograph was published in March 2013. Electronic copies can be
downloaded from the
Timeline
Concise Monograph Concise Monograph Editorial Team
Scientific Advisor Prof. Glenn Gibson University of Reading Dr Mary-Ellen Sanders International Scientific Association for Pro Prof. Nathalie Delzenne Catholique de Louvain Prof. Lorenzo Morelli Catholic University of Piacenza Dr Gunhild Kozianowski Südzucker/BENEO Group Dr Annick Mercenier Scientific Advisor Dr Alessandro Chiodini LATEST PUBLICATIONS
N. Binns.ILSI Europe Concise Monograph Series 2013;1-32. M. Roberfroid, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2010;104(Suppl.2):S1-S63. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 PROBIOTICS TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Probiotic bacteria may be defined as ‘live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host' (FAO/WHO 2001). Therefore, consumers, the scientific community and the food industry show an increasing interest in these microorganisms. The Probiotics Task Force aims at providing guidelines for the assessment of their effects on health through modulation of the intestinal microbiota. The task force has enhanced the understanding of the interaction between the gut, the intestinal flora and probiotics, also called ‘crosstalk' between humans and microbes. Additionally it contributes to the scientific understanding and substantiation of health claims regulations. Look for the 2010 supplement in entitled ‘Guidance for Assessing the Probiotics Beneficial Effects: How to Fill the Gap' for a summary of evidence on the functionality of probiotics.  The recent collaboration with the Prebiotics Task Force led to a joint Concise Monograph which summarises the science and principles valid for prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics today.  The latest publication in the British Journal of Nutrition focuses on immunomodulation. Building upon the successful it describes how to select markers for future trials and provides a framework for the interpretation of outcomes. This work was presented as a poster at the 20th International Congress of Nutrition (ICN 2013) in Granada, September 2013. It has also been introduced at other global venues, including the International Immunonutrition Workshop 2012 (Spain), ISAPP 2012 (Ireland) and 2013 (New York), EAACI 2013 (Milan), Ganepão 2013 (Brazil), and Probiotics and their Applications 2013, Vietnam National Institute of Nutrition (Vietnam). Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Arthur Ouwehand – Chair DuPont Nutrition and Health Dr Annick Mercenier – Vice-Chair Dr Jean-Michel Antoine Dr Stéphanie Courau Merck Consumer Healthcare Dr Diana Diofebi Dr Franck Gerberick Procter & Gamble Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop IDF - ILSI Europe Liaison Officer Dr Tomoyuki Sako Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Ms Marie Latulippe ILSI Europe EXPERT GROUP
PROBIOTICS: INTERPLAY WITH THE INTESTINAL BARRIER FUNCTION


Objective
Intestinal barrier function and microbiota composition and activity can be affected, for
example, by acute infections, antibiotic use, stress or other dietary factors. However, a
treatment with appropriate probiotic strains could help to restore the intestinal barrier
function. An expert group was set up to determine the state-of-the-art in intestinal barrier
function and its role in health and disease and to investigate the potential impact of probiotics
(direct and indirect) on intestinal barrier function.
Activity
The expert group divided the activity in the following three parts, addressing each one
independently, but without losing sight of the overall view:
 Gut barrier defence and related biomarkers;  Deficiencies in gut barrier defence and links to disease;  Probiotics and prebiotics as interventions to enhance gut barrier function.
Expected outcome
The group is assessing the current evidence of probiotic-induced intestinal barrier
enhancement and subsequent protective effects. The goal is to crystallise existing
consensus, if any, in treatment modalities, to harmonise the validation of markers, and to
pinpoint most relevant areas for research.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Timeline

Expert Group Members
Prof. Jerry Wells -– Chair
Wageningen University Dr Annick Mercenier – Vice-Chair Prof. Robert Brummer Örebro University Prof. Patrice Cani Université catholique de Louvain Wageningen University Dr Muriel Derrien Prof. Willem de Vos Wageningen University Prof. Thomas MacDonald Centre for Immunology and Infectious UK Disease Royal FrieslandCampina Dr Vassilia Theodorou National Institute of Agricultural Research - FR Dr Freddy Troost Maastricht University Ms Marie Latulippe EXPERT GROUP
SELECTING AND INTERPRETING MARKERS OF IMMUNOMODULATION IN NUTRITION STUDIES

Objective
In conjunction with the Nutrition and Immunity in Man Task Force, the group aims to provide
expert guidance for the selection and interpretation of immunomodulation markers applied in
nutrition intervention studies.
Activity
It is generally accepted that nutrition, and thereby also probiotics, influences immune
function. Questions remain, however, regarding how to most appropriately monitor such
effects in a nutrition intervention study. The expert group evaluated markers with a scoring
system which involves criteria covering biological relevance, biological sensitivity and
feasibility of measurement. Guidelines for the interpretation of marker modulation in the
context of a nutrition study were developed.
Outcome
The final review (Albers et al. British Journal of
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Nutrition 2013) provides comprehensive guidance for the interpretation of future studies of
nutrition and immunity in the general population. These guidelines will allow further
modification when novel markers are identified. This expert guidance can be applied to
experimental design and interpretation to support immune benefits.
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Prof. Ulrich Sack ─ Chair University of Leipzig Dr Phoukham Phothirath ─ Vice-Chair Scientific Advisor Dr Raphaëlle Bourdet-Sicard Prof. Philip Calder University of Southampton Dr Murielle Cazaubiel Mead Johnson Nutrition Dr Claude Lambert Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Etienne FR Dr Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop IDF - ILSI Liaison Officer Dr Arthur Ouwehand Dr Tomoyoki Sako Prof. Seppo Salminen University of Turku Dr André Siemensma Royal FrieslandCampina Prof. Henk van Loveren National Institute of Public Health and the Environment – RIVM Ms Marie Latulippe
CONCISE MONOGRAPH
PROBIOTICS, PREBIOTICS AND THE GUT MICROBIOTA

Objective
The monograph aims to address in a single document both probiotic and prebiotic concepts
(often confused by consumers), and to discuss the functions of the intestinal microbiota.
Activity
Facing the recent published data on pre- and probiotics and their impact on health, the task
force decided to join forces with the Prebiotics Task Force to commission a Concise
Monograph. It contains science-based answers to issues of definition, purpose, rationale for
use, manufacture and processing, mechanisms of action, and health effects of these dietary
components.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
Outcome
The challenge in nutritional sciences is not to tackle diseases with a pharmaceutical
approach, but rather to provide dietary solutions to maintain and support health and thereby
reduce the risk of diseases. Therefore, the monograph discusses the current abundant
scientific knowledge on prebiotics, probiotics and the intestinal microbiota, including the
resulting effects on the host. It is noteworthy that these ingredients can be readily
incorporated into a balanced diet and that there is a growing body of evidence for their
potential health benefits. It has been posted to the website of the International Scientific
Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) and it has been disseminated to ILSI
branches. Distribution at global congresses is ongoing. Electronic copies can be downloaded
from the
Timeline
Concise Monograph Concise Monograph
Editorial Team

Scientific Advisor Prof. Glenn Gibson University of Reading Dr Mary-Ellen Sanders International Scientific Association for Pro Prof. Nathalie Delzenne Catholique de Louvain Prof. Lorenzo Morelli Catholic University of Piacenza Dr Gunhild Kozianowski Südzucker/BENEO Group Dr Annick Mercenier Scientific Advisor Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013
LATEST PUBLICATIONS
R. Albers, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110(Suppl. 2):S1-S30. Binns N. ILSI Europe Concise Monograph Series 2013;1-32. Neu J. Guest Editor Journal of Nutrition 2010;140;S671-S721. For more detailed information, please contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities



Societal Aspects
Task Force
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Consumer Science CONSUMER SCIENCE TASK FORCE
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Food choice and dietary behaviour are among the most important lifestyle factors determining human health and well-being. It is therefore of utmost importance to both the food industry and decision makers but also to consumer representatives to better understand the reasons behind consumers' food choices.The Consumer Science Task Force uses scientific knowledge of social sciences to enable in-depth understanding of consumer behaviour. The task force developed guidelines to help the conduct of appropriate understanding of health claims. It also addressed consumer acceptance of new food technologies. As a result, industry can better anticipate consumers' reactions to new technologies when developing new products. The work of the task force helps industry and decision-makers develop appropriate risk and benefit communication so that consumers can make well-informed and healthy choices.  The latest activity of the task force on risk/benefit communication about food (e.g. on chemical contaminants, genetic modification of foods, food additives) resulted in a systematic review paper which has been accepted for publication in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. The paper mapped the range of theoretical approaches which have been adopted (such as dual processing theories, social judgement theory or perceptual risk mapping), assessed the impact of different risk communication interventions (for chronic or acute risks), and identified implications for best practice in food risk communication. UPCOMING ACTIVITY
 A new activity will examine the development of energy intake regulation from infancy to adolescence. The activity will provide advice to parents and stakeholders on how they can support the development of optimal energy regulation in this age group to prevent obesity. The activity is planned to start in December 2013. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Consumer Science
2013 TASK FORCE MEMBERS
Dr Carel Vereijken – Chair Dr Karen Cunningham Coca-Cola Europe Soremartec Italia – Ferrero Group Dr Johanna Kuenzel Klazine van der Horst Dr Michel Rogeaux Dr Josephine Wills* Scientific Project Manager (SPM) Mr Roland Faludi * Observer EXPERT GROUP
CONSUMER RISK AND BENEFIT COMMUNICATION FOR FOOD TECHNOLOGIES


Objective
The expert group aimed to provide guidance for effective risk (and benefit) communication
about food topics. The review aims to optimise consumer protection associated with food
consumption. This activity provides scientific input for organisations responsible for or
involved in assessing and managing (perceived) food risks. This may ultimately lead to an
increase of societal trust in novel foods and in foods in general.
Activity
The expert group has conducted a systematic review on food risk/benefit communication and
the impact of communication interventions on related risk/benefit attitudes and behaviours of
the general public. Factors to be considered for adequate risk communication as well as best
practices in risk (benefit) communication were identified at a stakeholder meeting organised
in September 2012.
Outcome
The review showed that research on food risk/benefit communication has been fragmented,
and theoretical approaches infrequently applied. Both consumers' risk perceptions and risk–
related behaviours need to be taken into account in relation to any potential food hazard, and
recommendations for behavioural change need to be concrete and applicable. Future
research should further assess the impact of risk/benefit communication on behaviour itself
rather than on behavioural intention. The paper has been accepted for publication in Critical
Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
.
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Consumer Science
Timeline

Expert Group Members

Prof Lynn Frewer – Chair University of Newcastle University of Newcastle Dr Arnout Fischer Wageningen University University Maastricht Scientific Advisor Prof Michael Siegrist Prof Wim Verbeke University of Ghent Dr Carel Vereijken Mr Roland Faludi LATEST PUBLICATIONS
K. Grunert, et al.Trends in Food Science & Technology 2012; 28(2):132-142. L.J. Frewer, et al.Trends in Food Science and Technology 2011;22(8):442-456. For more detailed information, please contact Mr Roland Faludi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities



European Projects
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 INTEGRATED IN SILICO MODELS FOR THE PREDICTION OF HUMAN
REPEATED DOSE TOXICITY OF COSMETICS TO OPTIMISE SAFETY
BACKGROUND
AT A GLANCE
Since 11 March 2013, the use of animals (in vivo experiments) to test chemicals to be used Total Budget: € 3,350,000 as cosmetic ingredients is forbidden. Therefore Consortium: 15 partners there is a need for alternative risk assessment Countries: 8 countries methods and the ‘Threshold of Toxicological Duration: 1 Jan 2011 – 31 Dec 2015 Concerns' (TTC) approach is one of them. TTC is a widely applied risk assessment approach that establishes a human exposure threshold value for chemicals, below which there is a low probability of an appreciable risk to human health. The current TTC approach was developed from an oral toxicity database and its applicability to dermal exposure is under consideration. The TTC concept is a potential alternative to the use of in vivo studies. OBJECTIVE
COSMOS assesses on the one hand how the current TTC approach could be applied to cosmetic ingredients, and on the other hand how to extrapolate from the oral to dermal route exposure, which is particularly relevant for cosmetics. The COSMOS project is a unique collaboration addressing the safety assessment needs of the cosmetics industry, without the use of animals. EXPECTED IMPACT
The European research initiative SEURAT has the long-term goal of achieving "Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing". COSMOS is one of the seven projects forming the SEURAT-1 cluster. The main aim of COSMOS is to develop freely available (open access and source) tools and workflows to predict the harmful long-term effects of cosmetic ingredients to humans. The project will deliver guidelines and recommendations to expand the current TTC approach in order to broaden its applicability and regulatory acceptance for cosmetic ingredients. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe is a partner in this project contributing via 2 expert groups : ‘Criteria to apply the
TTC approach to cosmetic ingredients', and ‘Evaluation of oral-to-dermal extrapolation'.
EXPERT GROUP 1
Development of criteria to be applied in the extension of the current TTC approach to
cosmetics ingredients

Objective
An oral toxicity database of cosmetics ingredients is being developed. The database could
ultimately be used to confirm that the current TTC tiers are applicable to cosmetic
ingredients. The database is a combination of existing public data plus new data harvested
for cosmetic ingredients by COSMOS.
Activity
The expert group is determining the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL)/ Lowest
Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) for the chemicals included in the database. The
criteria to be used have been clearly identified and are documented in an internal COSMOS
report. The purpose is to:
 Evaluate the new structural categories applicable for cosmetics ingredients;  Recommend and compare new thresholds with the current levels. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Outcome
This expert group advised on inclusion criteria for chemicals and toxicological studies. These
criteria will help in creating a toxicity database for cosmetics and support the evaluation of
the data collection.
Expert Group Members

Dr Chihae Yang – Chair Prof. Alan Boobis Imperial College London Prof. Mark Cronin Liverpool John Moores University Procter & Gamble Prof. Daniel Krewski Institute of Population Health Dr Kristi Muldoon Jacobs Prof. em Andrew Renwick University of Southampton European Commission – Joint Research IT Centre Dr Alessandro Chiodini

EXPERT GROUP 2
Evaluation of oral-to-dermal extrapolation

Objective
This expert group focuses on the technical issues associated with oral-to-dermal
extrapolation, identifying data needs and assessing the feasibility of extrapolation.
Additionally, the group is investigating possible methods to improve extrapolation and
whether modelling could be applicable.
Activity
The group is developing a dermal absorption database containing data of recent in vitro and
in vivo dermal absorption studies from peer reviewed literature and from COSMOS
collaborators. Cosmetic chemicals of interest are being grouped hierarchically according to
their metabolism in skin with the information required for each chemical. Several scenarios of
bioavailability of those chemicals will be proposed.
Outcome
The expert group assessed the feasibility of oral to dermal extrapolation for TTC for dermal
exposures to cosmetics (skin penetration/absorption vs. oral absorption, skin metabolism vs.
liver metabolism). The use of appropriate modelling training sets will be recommended when
dose level extrapolation is not possible due to lack of experimental dermal data.
Both expert groups will jointly contribute to the 4 following deliverables:  Report on existing TTC dataset;  Report on TTC approach adapted to cosmetics;  Report on new TTC datasets; Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013  Report on TTC approach extended to target organ (repeat-dose) toxicity for Expert Group Members
Prof. Faith Williams – Chair
University of Newcastle Dr Gordon Barrett Prof. Mark Cronin Liverpool John Moores University Prof. Richard Guy University of Bath Prof. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere Kansas State University Dr Alexandre Pery Charles River Laboratories Procter & Gamble Dr Miriam Verwei TNO Quality of Life Dr Alessandro Chiodini
Timeline for Both Expert Groups

For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry or Dr Alessandro Chiodini or visit Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 DIETICIANS ENSURING EDUCATION, TEACHING AND
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY – DIETS2
BACKGROUND
Dieticians have a fundamental role to play in promoting nutritional health through the life AT A GLANCE
cycle, in sickness or health and increasingly in preventative nutrition. To enhance the impact of Total Budget: € 599,700 the European dietician work, maintain their Consortium: 106 partners competence in the rapidly evolving areas of Countries: 31 countries nutritional science, social and demographic Duration: 1 Oct 2010 – 30 Sept 2013 change in Europe, dieticians need increasingly to embrace the full power of information communication technology (ICT) and their own lifelong learning (LLL). OBJECTIVE
DIETS2 is a Thematic Network comprising 101 partners in 31 countries, plus its associated partners internationally. The partnership also includes non-governmental agencies and as such represents a key cohesive resource of dietetics and nutrition in Europe. The DIETS2 Network aims to promote excellence in the education of dieticians across Europe at undergraduate and post qualifying level. The network aspires to make a difference to dietician preparedness to meet challenges of improving nutritional health in Europe through education. EXPECTED IMPACT
The DIETS2 Network is working towards a sustainable partnership of higher education, professional dietetic associations and NGOs working together to ensure that the dietetic workforce now and into the future is able to provide a healthful nutrition service. LLL, pedagogic tools and a world quality reference approach to practice will improve the effectiveness of European dieticians working cross-border and their capability to practice safely in strategic areas of nutritional health, e.g. clinical/tertiary care, food service and industry, primary care and health promotion. The deliverables of the Network addressed to and ready to use by National Dietetic Associations, Higher Education Institutions, students and other stakeholders can be found Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe is a partner for the worpackage ‘Embedding and driving change' with the task to share the knowledge of exploitation of the outcomes of the EU project EURRECA to inform the DIETS2 exploitation strategy. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry ator visit Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ECOLOGY OF DRUG RESISTANT BACTERIA AND TRANSFER OF
ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE THROUGHOUT THE FOOD CHAIN –
BACKGROUND
The introduction of antimicrobials in human medicine changed the options for treatment completely. However, the benefits of their AT A GLANCE
discovery were soon hampered as their use invariably leads to antimicrobial resistance Total Budget: € 9,000,000 (AMR). Although a number of steps have been Consortium: 20 partners taken to address and reduce the emergence and Countries: 10 countries spread of AMR over the last decades, its Duration: 1 Nov 2013 – 30 Oct 2018 continuous increase indicates that current control Website: Under development measures such as the ban on antimicrobial growth promotors or regional or national sensibilisation campaigns have had limited success. OBJECTIVE
EFFORT will study the complex epidemiology and ecology of AMR using newly developed molecular Molecular ecology & and bio-informatics technologies. To this end, EFFORT will include an exposure assessment of humans from animal/environmental sources. The ecological studies on isolates will be verified by in In vitro/ in vivo studies vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, real-life intervention studies will be conducted Quantification of antimicrobials in veterinary practice. Focus will be on understanding the eco-epidemiology of AMR from animal origin and based on this, predicting and limiting the future evolution and exposure to humans Interventions to of the most clinically important resistance by reduce antimicrobials compiling different sources of information in our in veterinary practice prediction models. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 EXPECTED IMPACT
Through its results, the EFFORT project will provide scientific evidence and high quality data that will inform decision-makers, the scientific community and other consequences of AMR in the food chain, in relation to animal health and welfare, food safety and economic aspects. These results can be used to support political decisions and to prioritize risk management options along the food chain. ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe, via its Emerging Microbiological Issues Task Force, is mainly involved in conducting a literature review on ‘Determination of the conditions to which bacteria are subjected throughout the food chain' and preparing a publication for a peer reviewed journal. In addition, ILSI Europe will participate in the dissemination of the project by developing specific material such as flyer, newsletter, poster etc. It will also be in charge of organising the final conference to successfully disseminate the EFFORT outputs to relevant stakeholders. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 STUDY ON THE NEED FOR FOOD AND HEALTH RESEARCH
INFRASTRUCTURES IN EUROPE – EURODISH
BACKGROUND
Europe is facing major challenges in promoting health and reducing the disease AT A GLANCE
burden of age- and diet-related non-communicable diseases by means of lifestyle, Total Budget: € 2,000,000 food and nutrition. Research collaboration, Consortium: 15 partners innovation, and capacity building are essential Countries: 7 countries to efficiently benefit from the – mainly public – Duration: 1 Sept 2012 – 31 Aug 2015 research resources. To realise this, EU-wide Research Infrastructures (RIs) are essential. OBJECTIVE
EuroDISH is focusing on the integration of existing food and health RIs, as well as the development of new ones. It will consider the needs of different stakeholders, such as EU and national policy makers, and researchers from a range of disciplines in both the public sector and industry. EuroDISH research will be organised around the ‘DISH' model: ‘Determinants, Intake, Status and Health'. This model represents four key building blocks of food and health research as well as different stages of RI development. The EuroDISH project is taking place in three phases:  Mapping existing RIs and identify gaps, needs and governance issues;  Integrating findings within and between DISH pillars, by defining larger entities of required RIs and identifying new arising gaps and needs;  Developing a conceptual design with a roadmap for implementation. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 EXPECTED IMPACT
The work carried out in the project will be used to develop recommendations to inform the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) and future European funding programmes, as well as other stakeholders, for food and health RI development. The work will strengthen research on food, nutrition and health; assist policy makers; and increase exploitation of the scientific evidence base towards enhanced competitiveness of the EU food industry. ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe is mainly involved in the ‘Methodological Support' workpackage, facilitating the work across EuroDISH to ensure the integration of the results and thus ensuring their greater usability. ILSI was responsible for the organisation of the EuroDISH Phase one workshop on ‘Mapping Food and Health Research Infrastructures' that was held on 17-18 June 2013 in Brussels, Belgium. The workshop aimed at critically evaluating the reports created within EuroDISH to map RIs status quo in Europe as well as evaluating the gaps and needs for new food and health RIs. The next workshop will be organised on 19-20 May 2014 in Brussels, Belgium. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry ator visi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 INTEGRATED APPROACHES TO FOOD ALLERGEN AND
ALLERGY RISK MANAGEMENT – IFAAM
BACKGROUND
Up to 20 million European citizens suffer from AT A GLANCE
food allergy. However management of both Total Budget: € 9,000,000 Consortium: 38 partners practitioners) and allergens (by industry) is Countries: 18 countries thwarted by lack of evidence to either prevent Duration: 1 Mar 2013 – 28 Feb 2017 food allergy developing or protect adequately those who are already allergic. OBJECTIVE
iFAAM will develop evidence-based approaches and tools for management of allergens in food and integrate knowledge derived from their application and new knowledge from intervention studies into food allergy management plans and dietary advice. The iFAAM approach will build on e-Health concepts to allow full exploitation of complex data obtained from the work of this project and previous and ongoing studies, maximising sharing and linkage of data, by developing an informatics platform "Al erg-e-lab". EXPECTED IMPACT
The resulting holistic strategies will reduce the burden of food allergies in Europe and beyond, whilst enabling the European food industry to compete in the global market place. Stakeholders will be integrated into iFAAM to deliver harmonised integrated approaches, including risk assessors and managers working on population risk, the food industry who manages allergens to ensure consumer safety, health care practitioners to provide food allergy management plans and dietary advice and allergic consumers to manage individual risk. ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe, via its Food Allergy Task Force, is mainly involved in the Dissemination workpackage that aims at coordinating effective dissemination of project results to ensure impact in terms of improved quality of life for allergic consumers, competitiveness of the European food industry. For further details on this project, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry or Ms Athanasia Baka at abaka@ilsieurope.be. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 APPLICATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND METHODS IN NUTRITION
RESEARCH – THE EXAMPLE OF PHENOTYPIC FLEXIBILITY –
NUTRITECH
BACKGROUND
Diet, foods and food components are prime environmental factors affecting the genome, AT A GLANCE
transcriptome, proteome and metabolome. This life-long interaction largely defines the health or Total Budget: € 6,000,000 disease state of an individual. The adaptive Consortium: 24 partners capacity of the body to alterations in dietary Countries: 16 countries conditions is called "phenotypic flexibility" and Duration: 1 Jan 2012 – 31 Dec 2015 is key to maintenance of overall homeostasis and consequently, health and healthy ageing. OBJECTIVE
NutriTech is applying a novel combination of technologies to assess most comprehensively human "phenotypic flexibility" as a surrogate for health and disease states related to nutrition and life style. It is based on a unique spectrum of non- and minimally invasive techniques for imaging body composition, metabolism, and for assessing the molecular changes at all (cellular, organ and systemic) levels to dietary changes using transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and imaging techniques. Methods are in the first instance evaluated within a human intervention study, and the resulting optimal methods will be validated in a number of existing cohorts against established endpoints. EXPECTED IMPACT
The impact of NutriTech will be multifold and exploitation is crucial as major breakthroughs from developed technology and research are expected. NutriTech is applying and evaluating a series of cutting edge analytical methods to capture subtle physiological processes related with diet and optimal health. The integration of these methods will provide a new generation of tools and biomarkers for nutrition and health research, potentially allowing the transition from diagnosis of diseases to maintaining optimal health. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe via its Functional Foods Task Force is Leader of the ‘Harmonisation and Dissemination' workpackage. NutriTech wil disseminate the harmonised and integrated technologies on a global scale by a large academic network including 6 non-EU partners and by providing an integrated and standardised data storage and evaluation platform. ILSI Europe organised a symposium on that took place from 4 to 7 February 2013 in Madrid (ES). Organised with the support of 3 other projects (NuGO, PhenPlex, BIOCLAIMS), it aimed to discuss the concept, mechanisms, consequences and relation with diet of phenotypic flexibility, its application as biomarker in nutrition and health research. ILSI Europe organised also the 1st International Workshop on that took place from 4 to 5 July 2013, in Glasgow (UK). For the first time, key experts in metabolomics, nutrition and epidemiology convened in order to define the most promising and shortest routes to mine the food metabolome and identify biomarkers needed to better understand the role of the diet in disease aetiology. The goal of the workshop was to identify the most efficient ways to acquire and exploit new knowledge in the field to find new biomarkers of dietary exposure required for epidemiological and clinical studies. The conclusions of the workshop will be included in a review paper on the food metabolome which will be submitted soon to a peer-reviewed journal. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry or Dr Alessandro Chiodini or visit Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 PIVOTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF BIOACTIVES ON THE
HEALTH AND WELLBEING, FROM HUMAN GENOME TO FOOD
INDUSTRY – PATHWAY-27
BACKGROUND
Scientific understanding of the role and mechanisms of bioactive compounds is AT A GLANCE
fragmented. Research often addresses the theoretical possibility of health improvement Total Budget: € 6,000,000
effects rather than their real, practical use for Consortium: 25 partners
everyday diets. To fulfil consumer demands for Countries: 12 countries
foods delivering appropriate health benefits, Duration: 1 Feb 2013 – 31 Jan 2018
bioactives cannot be considered as discrete chemical compounds and research must focus on bioactive-enriched foods. OBJECTIVE
PATHWAY-27 is a research project carried out by a pan-European interdisciplinary team of 16 life/social scientists and 9 high tech/food processing SMEs. It will uniquely address the role and mechanisms of action of 3 bioactives: docosahexaenoic acid, β-glucan, anthocyanins. These have been chosen for known/claimed effectiveness in reducing some risk factors of Metabolic Syndrome (MS), enriching 3 different widely-consumed food matrices (dairy-, bakery-, egg products). The project will determine the impact of the bioactive enriched foods (BEF) on physiologically-relevant endpoints related to MS risk and deliver a better understanding of the role and mechanisms of action of the 3 bioactives and BEF. Parallel in vitro/in vivo studies and the use of advanced omics techniques will enable the selection of robust biomarkers to be used in the evaluation of BEF effectiveness. EXPECTED IMPACT
The final PATHWAY-27 deliverables will include the formulation and production of BEF having a demonstrated effect in MS dietary treatment, but also generic protocols, best practices and guidelines for planning dietary interventions, and guidance to SMEs for producing health-promoting BEF and for submitting scientifically substantiated health claim dossiers to EFSA. The expected project impact will be optimised across Europe by targeted dissemination events to industry (especially SMEs), consumer and Science and Technology stakeholders. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe, with the input of its Functional Foods Task Force, is leading the workpackage on ‘Guidelines for the substantiation of nutritional and health claims on bioactive enriched foods'. The main objectives of this workpackage are preparation, publication and implementation of guidance documents that will inform and assist the food industry sector, especially SMEs, to produce BEF with supportive health claims according to the EU legislation. For more detailed information, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry or Dr Alessandro Chiodini or visit Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 TOTAL DIET STUDY EXPOSURE – TDS-EXPOSURE
BACKGROUND
Total diet studies (TDS) complement traditional monitoring and surveillance of population AT A GLANCE
dietary exposure to nutrients and non-nutrients (including contaminants), and potential impact Total Budget: € 6,000,000
on public health. TDS facilitate risk assessment Consortium: 26 partners
and health monitoring, but some EU Member Countries: 19 countries
States and Candidate Countries do not have Duration: 1 Feb 2012 – 31 Jan 2016
TDS programmes or use a variety of methods to collect data. As a result, comparison of data is not always possible. OBJECTIVE
TDS-Exposure will focus on exposure to food contaminants including heavy metals, mycotoxins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs, e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls), which pose a risk to human health and the environment, and estimate chronic exposure to pesticide residues in food as well as food additives intake. However, exposure will be based on whole diets, as consumed, rather than contamination of raw commodities, resulting in a more realistic measure of exposure to potentially harmful compounds than currently available. TDS-Exposure will standardise methods for food sampling, analyses, exposure assessment calculations and modelling, priority foods, and selection of chemical contaminants. In the process, a variety of approaches and methods for sampling and analyses will be assessed, and best practice defined. Contaminants and foods that contribute most to total exposure in Europe will also be established. EXPECTED IMPACT
TDS-Exposure will spread excellence in TDS throughout analysis, and science-based recommendations for future global studies. The European database of TDS studies that will be built during the project will be useful for risk assessors and risk managers like EFSA and DG Health and Consumers. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ROLE OF ILSI EUROPE
ILSI Europe, via its Food Intake Methodology Task Force, contributes to the work package on ‘Dissemination and Stakeholder – User communication'. This activity aims at communicating to key stakeholders the goals, methodology and expected results of the project as well as to disseminate project results to stakeholders, the scientific community and the general public. A stakeholder workshop will be organised on 5 February 2014 in Brussels, Belgium. For more detailed information on the project, please contact Dr Stéphane Vidry at svidry@ilsieurope.be or Mr Roland Faludi at or visit the website Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Scientific Activities



New Activity Proposals
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 New Activity Proposals REVIEW PROCEDURE FOR NEW ACTIVITY PROPOSALS
AND NEW TASK FORCE PROPOSALS
This new procedure is expected to provide a proper and independent review and intends to enhance the scientific quality and relevance of ILSI Europe's new activities whilst also improving the time effectiveness of the approval process. Since August 2012, all new activity proposals, soon after submission to ILSI Europe by their author(s), are circulated to the Scientific Adivsory Commitee to evaluate their merits and aims, provide scientific guidance, and identify any potential gaps or opportunities for task forces and expert groups. The new activity proposals (NAPs) are sent to all members of the Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC), but the President allocates each NAP to two members with relevant expertise for a more thorough review and, if needed, invites external reviewers. The SAC members and the external reviewer(s)'s comments and recommendations are collated by the ILSI Europe secretariat and passed on to the Board of Directors (BOD) for further comments. All SAC/external reviewer(s)/BOD comments are collated as reviewers' (anonymous) comments and sent to the NAP author(s) and to the related task force so they can address the comments received and improve the proposal. Then, the updated NAP is sent to the Board for its final decision (approval/rejection; quorum is needed). In case there is no full agreement, negative reviews or if the task force does not agree with the reviewers, a BOD sub-committee formed of ILSI Europe's officers and some non-industry BOD members will address the concerns. This continuous evaluation procedure will foster scientific collaboration and safeguard our credibility with increased effectiveness and transparency. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 New Activity Proposals Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 New Activity Proposals Approved New Task Force Proposals (NTFP) and
New Activity Proposals (NAP)
March 2013 – October 2013 Title of NTFP/NAP
Supportive Task Force, if applicable
New Horizons in Chemical Risk Assessment History-based Performance to Verify the Effectiveness of the Hazard Control System in Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology Food Processing Health Relevance of the Modification of Low- Nutrition and Immunity in Man grade Inflammation in Ageing Establishments of the Efficacy of Intervention Obesity and Diabetes in Those with the Metabolic Syndrome (formerly Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes) Marker Initiative in Nutrition Research: Developing a Guidance Document for the Functional Foods Assessment and Interpretation of Markers in Nutrition Studies Is the 0.15 µG/Day tier of the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) still Threshold of Toxicological Concern Industrial Microbiological Risk Assessment Risk Analysis in Food Microbiology Nutrition for the Ageing Brain: Evidence for an Nutrition and Mental Performance Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 New Activity Proposals New Task Force Proposals (NTFP) and
New Activity Proposals (NAP) Under Review
March 2013 – October 2013 Title of NTFP/NAP
Supportive Task Force, if applicable
Review on Development of Impulse Control and Self-regulation of Food Intake from Consumer Science Infancy to Adolescence: Theory, Research and Application Adequacies of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs Intakes in European Countries in Light of the Current Nutrient Requirements Recommendations. Do Differences in Intake Relate to Different Health Outcomes? Contribution of Dietary Supplements, Nutrient-Dense Food and Food Fortification to the Addition of Nutrients Micronutrient Intake and Status of the Elderly Public Health Physical and Chemical Properties of Dietary Eating Behaviour and Energy Balance Fibres relevant to Human Satiety Mycotoxins Decontamination, Detoxification Process-related Compounds and Natural and Food Processing Characterisation of and Criteria for Glycaemic Exposure Markers in the Non-diabetic Dietary Carbohydrates Population Exploring the Role of the Major Gut Microbiota Cluster on Nutritional and F unctional Benefits Functional Foods of Nutrients and Non-nutrients Preferred Approaches for Quantifying the Functional Foods Impact of Modifying Nutrient Intakes Collection and Evaluation of Relevant Indicators to Assess Sustainability in Food Environment and Health Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Publications



Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Articles and Proceedings in Peer-reviewed Journals ARTICLES AND PROCEEDINGS IN PEER-REVIEWED JOURNALS
ILSI Europe publishes articles and proceedings in peer-reviewed scientific journals. These publications are not under the responsibility of the Publication Committee. They are the responsibility of the task forces/expert groups, the ILSI Europe Secretariat, and the editors of the journals involved. From January till September 2013, 20 scientific articles have been published in peer-reviewed journals. ARTICLES AND PROCEEDINGS PUBLISHED IN 2013
 R. Albers, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110(Suppl.2):S1-S30.  F. Berthiller, et al. Molecular Nutrition and Food Research 2013;57(1):165-186.  J. Beulens, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;16:1-12.  A. Boobis, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology 2013;55:659-675. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Articles and Proceedings in Peer-reviewed Journals  P.C. Calder, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;109(Suppl.1):S1-S34.  M. Claessens, et al. Nutrition 2013;53(10):1135-1146.  B. Craft, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):46-51.  C. Crews, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):11-45.  J. de Vries, et al. European Journal of Nutrtion (Published online).  I. Dewhurst and A.G. Renwick.
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 2013;65(1):168-177.  R. Dhonukshe-Rutten, et al Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 2013;53(10):999-1040.  S. Griffioen-Roose, et al. British Nutrition Foundation Nutrition Bulletin 2013;38:373-377.  T. Hess, et al. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (Published online).  M.M. Hetheringlton, et al. Nutrition Research Reviews 2013;26(1):22-38.  J. Howlett, et al. Food and Nutrition Sciences 2013;(4):315-320.  G.B.M. Mensink, et al, British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110:755–773.  S.V. Sizonenko, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110(Suppl.1)S1-S30.  M. Symonds, et al. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 2013;62:137-145.  P. van't Veer, et al. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 2013;53(10): 988-998.  P. van't Veer, et al. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 2013;62(1):63-67. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Articles and Proceedings in Peer-reviewed Journals
ARTICLES AND PROCEEDINGS ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION
 C.A. de Jager, et al. Cognitive Function: Criteria for Validation and Selection of Cognitive Tests for Investigating the Effects of Foods and Nutrients. Nutrition Reviews (In Press).  L. Frewer, et al. Risk/Benefit Communication about Food – a Systematic Review of the Literature. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 2013 (In Press).  W. Russell, et al. Impact of Diet Composition on Blood Glucose Regulation. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition (In Press).  B. Schilter, et al. Establishing the Level of Safety Concern for Chemicals in Food without the Need for Toxicity Testing. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology (In Press).  S. Vidry, et al. Benefit-Risk Analysis for Foods (BRAFO) – Executive Project Summary. European Journal of Nutrition and Food Safety (In Press).  L. Edler, et al. Selection of appropriate tumour data sets for Benchmark Dose Modelling (BMD) and derivation of a Margin of Exposure (MoE) for substances that are genotoxic and carcinogenic: considerations of biological relevance of tumour type, data quality and uncertainty assessment. Food and Chemical Toxicology (In Press) Impact Factor 2012
(IF/2012)
Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism British Journal of Nutrition Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition Food Additives and Contaminants Food and Chemical Toxicology Food and Nutrition Sciences Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture Molecular Nutrition and Food Research Nutrition Research Reviews Nutrition Reviews Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Articles and Proceedings in Peer-reviewed Journals
ARTICLES AND PROCEEDINGS IN PREPARATION
 Data selection for BMD Modeling of Substances which are Genotoxic and Carcinogenic  Outlook and challenges of nanotechnologies for food packaging  The regulation of the gut barrier function and potential markers  The role of a dysfunctional intestinal barrier in human disease  Effects of a nutritional intervention on intestinal barrier function, and implications for disease prevention and therapy ( specific focus on impact of probiotics)  Recommendations for dietary fibre intake in Europe – can we specify types and food  Criteria to determine effectiveness of dietary exposure mitigation  New strategies for safety assessment of (Novel) Foods and Ingredients  Proposed progressive scheme to monitor dietary exposure to micronutrients through voluntary fortified foods at national level in the European Union based on existing data collection  Part I: Advances in the risk management of unintended presence of allergenic foods in manufactured food products – an overview  Part II: Development and evolution of risk assessment for food allergens  Part III: Translating reference doses into allergen management practice: challenges for  Food packaging: scientific development supporting safety and innovation; proceedings of the 5th international symposium on food packaging organised by ILSI Europe.  Safety implications of microbial nucleic acids in food  Water as a source of microbial contamination in fresh produce and empirical evidence for setting guidelines to water use in the fresh produce supply chain  QMRA in assessing water sources/ water quality to be used in the fresh produce supply  Non-Intentionally Added Substances (NIAS) in food contact materials and articles  Industrial microbiological risk assessment  History-based performance of the HACCP control systems to verify the effectiveness of food safety management Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI Europe Concise Monograph and Report Series ILSI EUROPE CONCISE MONOGRAPH AND REPORT SERIES
In addition to articles and proceedings in scientific journals, ILSI Europe publishes in its Report Series and Concise Monograph Series. The review of these publications fall within the remit of the Publication Committee. From January till September 2013, one Concise Monograph and one ILSI Europe Report have been published. Four manuscripts are in preparation. CONCISE MONOGRAPH AND REPORT PUBLISHED IN 2013
Concise Monograph CONCISE MONOGRAPH AND REPORTS IN PREPARATION
Concise Monograph Antioxidants and Anti-Inflammatory Agents Assessing the Safety of Water Used in the Production and Processing of Fresh and Minimally Processed Produce Packaging Materials 2. Polystrene for Food Packaging Applications Update on Packaging Materials 1. PET Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Success Stories



Share your success stories with us!
Contact our Communication Manager Ms Fanny Rollin at
Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Benefit Risk Analysis of Foods – BRAFO
Risk assessment is a well established process that follows a scientific approach. This has
served to protect consumers from potentially harmful effects of chemicals to which they might
otherwise have been exposed through food consumption. However, for chemicals with
putative direct health benefits (e.g. vitamins or phyto-oestrogens), the situation is more
complex. Therefore it is necessary for decision-makers to evaluate both benefits and risks on
health.
Funded by the European Commission and coordinated by ILSI Europe,
(Benefit Risk Analysis of FOods) developed a framework that
allows quantitative comparison of human health risks and benefits of
foods and food compounds based on a common scale of measurement.
BRAFO evaluated the quality/duration of life using a system that allows weighting of data
quality and severity of effect, with quantification by Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) or
Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY)-like methodology. The BRAFO framework took into
account how benefits and risks interrelate and, for the first time, added benefits evaluation to
the usual risk assessment paradigm. The BRAFO tiered approach enables early
identification of cases where benefit clearly outweighs risk (or vice versa). In some cases,
conclusions can be drawn at a lower tier of the methodology without any complicated
calculations. The benefit-risk framework was reinforced, tested and validated on selected
examples of foodstuffs and food components. Three groups of case studies were conducted:
Natural Foods, Dietary Intervention and Heat Processing.
The European Food Safety Authority's (EFSA) Scientific Committee published a guidance
document on the risk-benefit assessment of food, taking into consideration methodologies,
tools and potential limitations of several European funded projects, including BRAFO.
The outcomes of the BRAFO project were published as in Food and
Chemical Toxicology
.
For More Information
 S. Vidry, et al. Benefit-Risk Analysis for Foods (BRAFO) – Executive Project Summary. European Journal of Nutrition and Food Safety (In Press).  J. Hoekstra, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2012; 50: S684-S698.  B. Watzl, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology 2012;50:S699-S709.  H. Verhagen, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology 2012;50:S710-S723. Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Benefit Risk Analysis of Foods – BRAFO  K. Schütte, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2012;50:S724-S735.  A. Boobis, et al. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2013;55: 659-675.  Visit theor contact Dr Stéphane Vidry or Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Emerging Microbiological Issues Water and Sanitation EMERGING MICROBIOLOGICAL ISSUES TASK FORCE
NINE ILSI BRANCHES JOINED FORCES ON WATER AND SANITATION
Contaminated irrigation water can contribute to the contamination of raw produce and induce
waterborne diseases. Additionally, climate change (e.g. water scarcity, flooding) impacts
water availability at local levels, as well as the quality and quantity of fresh produce
productions. A poor water quality from both a microbiological and chemical perspectives may
result in high health risks for the population. Therefore, identifying the factors influencing the
quality of water and fresh produce is fundamental. A series of actions are undertaken by
WHO and FAO, including the publication of Guidelines for the Safe Use of Wastewater,
Excreta and Greywater.
ILSI Europe and 8 other ILSI Branches (India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, North Andean, South
Africa, South Andean and Southeast Asia Region) joined forces to explore the relationship
between food and water safety and security. They aim at identifying gaps in evaluating the
quality of water used for irrigation, as well as at facilitating the interpretation and practical
implementation of the above mentioned guidelines, at the farm and wholesale purchaser
level to minimise risks from food crops irrigated with treated wastewater. This project will help
enhance sustainability in the use of water without compromising the safety and quality of the
products from the fresh produce industry.
For this activity, ILSI received the technical support of WHO and FAO and of other
stakeholders such as the Inland Waterways Association, the International Water
Management Institute and the Sheffield Institute for International Development.
For more information
 Visit theor contact Dr Stéphane Vidry at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Food Intake Methodology Task Force FOOD INTAKE METHODOLOGY TASK FORCE
Dietary exposure assessment is a key component of any risk-benefit assessment. However, there is a clear lack of reliable methodology for assessing consumer exposures to both food constituents and non-food products. The ILSI Europe Food Intake Methodology Task Force held a workshop in December 2008 to discuss the differences between the current types of exposure assessments as well as the difficulties involved in the application of the methods available. Although exposure assessments may differ in terms of data requirement and availability, or assumptions, it cannot justify the unnecessary variation between the approaches taken by different assessors. Therefore, the task force worked on producing a practical guide for conducting intake/exposure assessments in the form of an interactive web-based application. The goal is to encourage harmonisation of practices for determining assessments, leading to better health recommendations. In October 2012, the task force successfully launched the websit This website helps better assess intakes and exposures of individuals to substances in foods, such as migrates from packaging, pesticides, nutrients and food additives. The site is designed on a ‘Wikimedia' shared knowledge platform which enables its continuous evolvement over time with new information and data via contributions by experts. The guide is meant to be a key reference source for stakeholders, providing concise guidance on the planning, conduct, assessments and contributing to greater harmonisation of
the dietary intake/exposure methodologies used.
For more information
 The task force's latest paper describes the history of GUIDEA and its main principles, and provides insight on future development in this area. was organised as part of Eurotox 2013. Participants had the opportunity to receive training into the use of GUIDEA.  Visit the  Visit theor contact Mr Roland Faludi Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Nutrition and Mental Performance Impact of Nutrition on Brain Functions NUTRITION AND MENTAL PERFORMANCE TASK FORCE
IMPACT OF NUTRITION ON BRAIN FUNCTIONS
The Nutrition and Mental Performance Task Force was founded in 2004, when awareness of
the role of foods and nutrients in brain development and functions was just percolating. It has
since been estimated that the 2010 cost of mental disorders in the European Union was
€798 bil ion. Nutrition may help reduce this burden as il ustrated by many studies reporting
links between nutrient intake and brain function across the lifespan. This developing science
points to a great opportunity for food and nutrient innovation.
In the last few years, the task force issued 5 peer-reviewed papers and supplements
focusing on methodologies and assessment, and covering children, the elderly, and the
generally healthy population. In light of the 2012 final EFSA guidance for health claims on
psychological functions, the task force has developed expert guidance to promote
harmonization of nutrition and mental performance studies which can likewise inform the
evaluation of claim submissions. Two comprehensive reviews on 1) use of brain imaging
techniques and 2) use of cognitive tests in nutrition interventions have been published in
peer-reviewed journals.
The task force has been very successful in laying the groundwork for researchers interested
in the brain effects of food and nutrients, and in disseminating globally the possibilities for
advanced technologies such as brain imaging to indicate early effects of nutrition. In 2013,
the task force organised a session entitled ‘Brain Imaging and Human Nutrition: Which
Measures to Use in Intervention Studies?' at the Experimental Biology 2013, Boston, USA.
This event gathered 10,000 participatns, among those 300 participated at the session. Two
expert group members presented the altest work of the tsk force to 300 attendees at the 20th
International Congress of Nunitition (ICN 2013). These two events are unique opportunities
to reach a worldwide audience and inform peers about the latest advancement in the field of
brain and nutrition.
Discussing long-term objectives, the task force aims to become a recognized credible body
generating outputs that address unmet needs in the nutrition and brain field.
For more information
 S.V. Sizonenko, et al. British Journal of Nutrition 2013;110(Suppl 1):S1-S30.  C.A. de Jager, et al. Cognitive function: Criteria for Validation and Selection of Cognitive Tests for Investigating the Effects of Foods and Nutrients. Nutrition Reviews 2013 (In Press).  J.A.J. Schmitt, et al. Proceedings. Nutrition Reviews 2010;68(1):S1-S58. contact Ms Marie Latulippe at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Process-related Compounds and Natural Toxins PROCESS-RELATED COMPOUNDS AND NATURAL TOXINS
MCPD ESTERS
3-MCPD (monochloropropane-1,2-diol or 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol) is a contaminant which
may occur through food processing. It is formed in foods containing fat and salt when they
are exposed to high temperatures during production (e.g. hydrolysed vegetable proteins and
soy sauce). Studies have linked 3-MCPD with infertility in rats, suppression of the immune
function and possible carcinogenicity.
Two ILSI Europe task forces on Risk Assessment of Chemicals in Food and Process-related
Compounds and Natural Toxins decided to address this potential human health threat. Their
activity mainly focused on how to measure the presence of MCPD and glycidyl ester (a
potential precursor of MCPD) in food products. An inventory of indirect and direct analytical
methods was created.
Key experts in the field but also stakeholders from BfR, DG SANCO and FEDIOL
participated in this activity and addressed analytical issues related to the detection of MCPD
and glycidyl esters. Their conclusions were collected in a manuscript that was reviewed in a
workshop in November 2011. The reviewed manuscript gives a detailed perspective of the
scientific developments of MCPD and glycidyl esters focusing on the analytics for monitoring,
the analytical methods for occurrence data and the analytical methods in toxicology.
As a follow-up activity, this methodology was applied to refined edible oils. Indeed, MCPD
esters and glycidyl esters are more concentrated in foods containing refined oils than in
foods with free oils. Therefore, ILSI Europe reviewed the occurrence and toxicity of these
chemicals in refined oils. Mitigation measures that might ensure future compliance with
exposure recommendations were also monitored. Further studies on metabolites and
biomarkers of exposure are required to calculate actual exposure and to characterise the
kinetics of 3-MCPD and glycidol release from their esters.
For more information
 C. Crews.
ILSI Europe Report Series 2012:1-24.  C. Crews, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):11-45.  B.D. Craft, et al. Food Additives and Contaminants 2013;30(1):46-51. contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Risk Assessment of Genotoxic Carcinogens Data Selection for Benchmark Dose Modelling RISK ASSESSMENT OF GENOTOXIC CARCINOGENS TASK FORCE
DATA SELECTION FOR BENCHMARK DOSE MODELLING
The Margin of Exposure (MoE) has been proposed as a means of providing advice to risk
managers on the potential level of concern from exposure to chemicals that are genotoxic and
carcinogenic. In 2010, the ILSI Europe Risk Assessment of Genotoxic Carcinogens Task Force
stated that there may be several MoE values associated with each of these chemicals. Indeed,
the value of the MoE depends on what you measure (the selected tumour endpoint i.e. the
outcome of a study) and on how you measure it (the method used in the data analysis). It is
therefore essential that the selection of the cancer endpoint and mathematical treatment of the
data are clearly described and justified.
In most cases, the treatment of the data and the selection of the models are highly dependent on
the risk assessors' judgement. Therefore, ILSI Europe formed an expert group to develop
practical guidance for risk assessors on how to select appropriate tumour data sets for
benchmark dose modelling and how to identify the key factors to be considered in the
subsequent derivation of a MoE. Additionally, the expert group focused on the relevance of
animal tumour data for human carcinogenic risk assessment and on how to deal with uncertainty
in the data selection for modelling and in the calculation of the MoE. This guidance increases the
comparability of risk assessment conclusions justifying risk assessors' decisions.
The manuscript has been submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal before the end of
2013.
For More Information
 A. Boobis, Editor.
Food and Chemical Toxicology 2010;48, (Suppl. 1).  Visit theor contact Dr Stéphane Vidry at Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 Threshold of Toxicological Concern An Alternative Approach for the Risk Assessment of Chemicals THRESHOLD OF TOXICOLOGICAL CONCERN TASK FORCE
AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR THE RISK ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICALS
Derived from the Threshold of Regulation (ToR) of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA),
the concept of Thresholds of Toxicological Concern (TTCs) has been used in the risk assessment
of chemicals to which humans are exposed at very low levels and for which chemical-specific
toxicity data are missing, like flavouring substances.
This concept is based on the assumption that a human exposure threshold exists for most
chemicals below which there is a very low or negligible probability of any risk to human health.
This threshold is called TTC value and is based on the probability that the chemical compounds
with similar structures share the same TTC value, or at least that the TTC value of a chemical
can be generated from the value of a similar compound.
The TTC approach is an important pragmatic but conservative tool for risk assessors and risk
managers. It accelerates the evaluation process of substances to which humans are exposed to
at low levels. Thus, it allows a better use of resources for compounds with high exposures and/or
high toxicity.
The international workshop organised by ILSI Europe in 2011 was of utmost importance to foster
scientific discussion between stakeholders and to support the acceptance of the TTC concept.
Participants reached the general consensus that the TTC approach is a valid first tier approach to
risk characterisation. The method could be fine-tuned by expanding the toxicological databases
and by reviewing the chemical classes in which the substances can be divided according to their
structure and toxicity. The Cramer and Kroes decision trees that are used to evaluate if the TTC
concept can be applied could also be improved. The TTC approach, however, should not be
considered an alternative to testing procedures required for regulatory approval. Consumers can
feel safe as standard testing procedures remain necessary for regulated substances; however,
the TTC approach enables a better use of resources and reduces considerably animal testing still
ensuring that - consumers' food safety is granted.
For more information
 I. Dewhurst and A.G. Renwick.
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 2012;50:2224-2242.  Visit theor contact Dr Alessandro Chiodini Draft 2014 Activity Document – October 2013 ILSI EUROPE
International Life Sciences Institute
Avenue E. Mounier 83, box 6
B - 1200 Brussels
Belgium
: +32 2 771 00 14


Source: http://www.czelo.cz/files/dokums_raw/ILSIEurope_Draft2014ActivityDoc_Oct2013.pdf

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An ISO 9001:2000 Certified Company Material Safety Data Sheet 3-[(Dimethylamino) Methyl] -1,2,3,9-Tetrahydro-9- Methyl-4h-Carbazol-4-One HCL Synonym: Ondansetron Mannich Base HCL; Ondansetron Mannich Base Cas No. 119812-29-2 Section 1 - Chemical Product and Company Identification Cas No. 119812-29-2 Contact Information: Synonym: Ondansetron Mannich Base HCL; Ondansetron

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Identifying and treating micropollutants in wastewater treatment stations in the fight against water pollution The AMPERES research programme CONTACTS PRESSE SUEZ ENVIRONNEMENT Charlotte Le Barbier +33 (0)1 58 18 54 61/ +33(0)6 78 37 27 60 charlotte.lebarbier@suez-env.com Christine Waser +33 (0)1 34 80 53 70/ +33 (0)6 87 29 90 54 christine.waser@suez-env.com CEMAGREF Marie Signoret +33 (0)1 40 96 61 30 / +33 (0)6 77 22 35 62 presse@cemagref.fr