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Microsoft word - ann_report_2002.doc

Annual Report for the Year 2002 National Institute of Physics College of Science, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines Table of Contents
I. Executive Summary
Caesar Saloma, Ph.D.
Director of Institute II. Report of the Deputy Director for Academic Affairs
Ronald Banzon, Ph.D.
III. Report of the Deputy Director for Research & Extensions
Arnel Salvador, Ph.D.
IV. Report of the Deputy Director for Facilities & Resources
Luis Maria Bo-ot, Ph.D.
PublicationsA1. ISI-abstracted journalsA2. Domestic journalsA3. International conferencesA4. Papers in domestic conferences Appendix B: Official Travels and Foreign Postings Appendix C: Research Projects in 2002C1. Research funded by NIPC2. Externally-funded research initiated Appendix D: Appendix E: Revised Curriculum Checklists Appendix F: NIP Enrollment and Number of Graduated Data Appendix G: New NIP (NNIP) Building Plans Appendix H: Cost Estimate for the NNIP Building Appendix I: Estimate of Furniture Requirement Cost (NNIP Phase 2) Chapter I. Executive Summary
by Caesar Saloma
This annual report is the third under my current term as Director of Institute which began on June 1,2000 and is scheduled to end on 31 May 2003. The previous two reports were released in the firstmonth of 2001 and 2002, respectively. Both documents could be accessed at the official website(www.nip.upd.edu.ph) of the National Institute of Physics (NIP).
The NIP was established by President Ferdinand E. Marcos via the issuance of Executive Order 889 in1983. It started operation as an institute on 26 May 1983 immediately after the approval of Board ofRegents of the University of the Philippines (UP).
Originally formulated in 1983, the mission of NIP is to serve as the national center of excellence for theacquisition, dissemination and application of knowledge in physics and applied physics. The currentpreeminent position of NIP among the various schools of physics that are offering undergraduate andgraduate programs in physics and applied physics in the Philippines, indicates that the mission has beenlargely fulfilled.
Eighty-six percent (86%) of all Philippine-affiliated physics publications in ISI-abstracted journalsbetween 1993 and 2002, has been produced by NIP-affiliated researchers. NIP is one of the only two(the other is the Marine Science Institute, UP Diliman) academic units in the Philippines, that requiresthe acceptance of one paper in an ISI journal before a PhD student is permitted to defend her PhDdissertation. A all-time record of 27 ISI papers were published by NIP researchers in 2002. In June2002, the Philippines entered the rankings of countries with the highest citations in physics (http://in-cites.com/newentrants/june2002.html). A country is included in the rankings if it is in the top 50% by totalcitations in a given field Our vision is to make NIP into one of the best schools of physics in the ASEAN by the year 2005.
This vision was formulated during a faculty development workshop that was conducted on August 17-19, 2002 at the UP Bolinao Marine Laboratory of the Marine Science Institute in Bolinao, Pangasinan.
The workshop was participated by twent y-two NIP faculty members (17 out of 19 PhD's, 4 Instructors7, 1 University Researcher) and the NIP administrative officer.
The realization of our vision will strongly depend upon the ability of NIP faculty and research staff torespond to the following challenges that they are facing: 1) To publish in ISI journals with high impactfactors, 2) To elicit high-citation rates of previously-published works, 3) To increase graduation rates forBS Physics and BS Applied Physics students (currently at 20% or less, of freshman class), 4) To obtaininternational patents, 5) To get appointed to editorial boards of ISI journals, and 6) To speak in high-caliber scientific conferences.
Crucial to the successful pursuit of the vision is the ability of NIP researchers to secure additionalresearch funds from external sources to support the acquisition of new research equipment and tools.
External funds are also needed to supplement the meager budget that is allotted to NIP formaintenance, operations and other expenses (MOOE). In the past, research support have mostly comefrom government agencies such as the Philippine Council for Advanced Science and TechnologyResearch and Development (PCASTRD), Commission on Higher Education (CHED), National Research Council of the Philippines (NRCP), and the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research andDevelopment, UP Diliman (OVCRD). While most of the research funds is expected to remain mostlypublic in the foreseeable future, NIP researchers must gain the confidence of the private sector andobtain financial support in terms of research grants and equipment donation. In the year 2002, the NIPhas been able to obtain financial support from Intel Philippines in the form of research grants andresearch equipment donation in the amount of USD 150000.
For the first time, NIP researchers filed three international patents in 2002 for techniques that weredeveloped in the Plasma Physics and Instrumentation Physics laboratories. These patents coveredtechniques that were developed to form titanium nitride films, to detect defects in integrated circuitsusing confocal reflectance microscopy and 1P-OBIC imaging, and two-color (two-photon) excitationwith a Raman shifter.
Construction of the new NIP building along CP Garcia Avenue has finally resumed in the last week ofNovember 2002, after several years of technical, legal and financial disputations. The new NIPbuilding consists of three mains sectors (wings) namely; research, faculty and administration andlecture halls. It has a total floor area of 13,914 square meters (area of old NIP building in 3rd Pavilionof Llamas Hall is approximately 4,000 square meters) and is estimated to cost about PhP 208,710,000(@ PhP 15,000 per square meter). The building is being designed by Architect Francisco Nakpil &Associates who also serve as consultants in the construction phase.
In the late 2000, UPD Chancellor Emerlinda Roman allotted a budget of PhP 30.2M for the resumptionof construction. It took almost two years to resolve and clarify the various issues affecting the previousbuilding contract that involved the University, the Commission on Audit and Architect Nakpil, beforeawarding building construction to NEWCO Builders and Development Corporation which submitted awinning (lowest) bid of PhP 19,376,000.00. The pre-determined scope of work (called Phase II)involves the completion of the first two floors of the Research Wing of the new NIP building.
Completion of construction works is expected in September 2003.
After deducting other expenses related to project administration and consultation services, a balance ofPhP 8.586M remains available from the original budget. Chancellor Roman has approved the NIPrequests to use the excess amount to carry-out additional construction works that include theconstruction of the structural framework of the succeeding (3rd) floor of the Research Wing and somesite development preferably the fencing of the new NIP building complex.
The first two floors of the Research Wing will house the Plasma Research Laboratory, the expandedLiquid Crystal Laboratory and all the teaching laboratories of NIP including the Physics 7X.1 classes inthe service courses for other science and engineering students.
President Francisco Nemenzo, Jr in his efforts to modernize the facilities of the University, awarded anequipment grant to NIP in the amount of PhP 18M. The grant was used to acquire: 1) Femtosecondlaser system (PhP 12M), 2) High-field Hall facility (PhP 2M), 3) Electro-optic facility (PhP 1M), 4)ECR/photodetachment devices (PhP 1M), and 5) Repair of nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. The femtosecondlaser facility will allow NIP researchers to carry-out new experiments in high-speed processes insemiconductor devices, two-photon excitation microscopy, ultrafast spectroscopy and nonlinear processes.
A femtosecond laser permits the delivery of optical energies at high peak powers but low average powers -a condition that enhances the probability of occurrence for nonlinear events without damaging the samplevia Joule heating.
The NIP requested and obtained from Chancellor Emerlinda Roman, an additional amount PhP 1M tosupplement its regular MOOE budget of PhP 0.85M. In 2001, the NIP also requested and received thesame amount of supplemental MOOE budget from the Office of the Chancellor.
In the area of instructions, efforts have been spent to improve the facilities of the Microcomputerlaboratory and the Advance Physics laboratory which are heavily utilized by the Physics and AppliedPhysics majors. Forty personal computers were purchased using the funds that are available in Center ofExcellence grant to NIP from the Commission on Higher Education. The quality of instruction in thecourses that use these laboratories has also improved considerably over the years.
Physics 10 (Physics and astronomy for pedestrians) which is a general education course (3 hours perweek, 40 students per class), was offered for first time in the 1st semester of AY 2002-2003. A team ofexperienced physics instructors headed by Dr Jose Perico Esguerra handled the lone Physics 10 section. Inthe 2nd semester, two sections of Physics 10 courses were offered and handled by the same team ofinstructors.
Measures were also taken to improve the passing rates in the Physics 7X courses for science andengineering students. A self-imposed passing rate of 75% in a given Physics 7X class was adapted. Thetarget rate has been largely achieved in the classes that were offered since SY 2001-2002, by improving thequality of examination questions and without compromising the level and quality of instruction in the saidcourses. Instructors and teaching associates have participated voluntarily in a number of seminars thatwere conducted by the Office of Instruction of UP Diliman.
Since June 2000, the NIP office has instituted a new procedure to improve the efficiency of issuingprerogatives to students who are unable to register in the Physics 7X and Physics 7X.1 classes duringthe regular period.
Our faculty members are also active in the activities of the Samahang Pisika ng Pilipinas (PhysicalSociety of the Philippines). In December 2001, Dr Salvador and Dr Soriano ended their 24-monthterms as SPP President and Secretary-General, respectively. Dr Daza and Dr Litong-Palima areassuming the positions of SPP President and Secretary-General respectively, starting January 2003. DrZenaida Domingo is the current chair of the NRCP Physics Division. A number of NIP faculty havealso been appointed as administrators and advisers in University and other government agencies. DrHenry Ramos is the program coordinator of the Science and Society Program of the College ofScience, UP Diliman. Dr Jose Magpantay serves as a science and technology adviser in the office ofUP President Francisco Nemenzo, Jr.
Latest information about the NIP may be obtained from its official website: www.nip.upd.edu.ph.
B. Personnel and Organization
In 1 June 2002, Dr. Caesar Saloma began to serve the third and last year of his term as the Director ofthe Institute. Dr. Saloma has been ably assisted in managing the day-to-day operations of the Instituteby the following Deputy Directors: Dr. Ronald Banzon (Academic Affairs), Dr. Luis Ma. Bo-ot(Facilities & Resources), and Dr. Arnel Salvador (Research & Extension Services). Deputy Directorsserve on the basis of annual appointments. The complete organizational structure of NIP is given in theAnnual Reports of 2000 and 2001.
The NIP Executive Council which is chaired by the NIP Director, is the highest policy-making body ofthe Institute. Apart from the NIP Director, it is composed of full-time Professors and AssociateProfessors as permanent members, and the three deputy directors, and six program coordinators as adhoc members. The NIP Director also chairs the Graduate Committee which consists of all full-timePh.D. faculty members of the Institute. The Graduate Committee is tasked to review and approvestudent applications into the NIP graduate program and to prepare the annual M.S./Ph.D.
comprehensive examinations.
The Undergraduate Physics Committee consists of all full-time faculty members who are handlingcourses in the B.S. Physics and Applied Physics programs. It is chaired by the Deputy Director forAcademic Affairs. The General Physics Committee consists of all faculty members who are handlinggeneral physics courses (Physics 71, 72, 73, 71.1, 72.1, and 73.1). It is chaired by a faculty that isappointed (with a term of one academic year) the NIP Executive Council through the recommendationof the NIP Director. Mr. Giovanni Tapang served as GPC chair in AY 2001-2002. The current GPCchair is Mr Matthew George Escobido.
In the 2nd semester of SY 2002-03, the NIP faculty consists of 22 Ph.D.'s (8 professors, 3 associateprofessors, 11 assistant professors) and 15 instructors (five with MS degrees) and 15 teachingassociates. For a complete list, see: http://www.nip.upd.edu.ph/people/person_faculty.html. Of the 35faculty items that are designated to NIP, eight are tenured (22.8%) which represents the lowestpercentage among all the academic units in the College of Science.
In 2002, three faculty members (VR Daria, C Villagonzalo, CM Blanca) went on postdoctoralresearch. Dr Villagonzalo and Dr Blanca are expected to rejoin the active teaching force in the 2ndsemester of SY 2002-03. Dr Linda Posadas applied for retirement from service in July 2002. DrPosadas who is a tenured faculty member, went on secondment on 1 July 1993 and has not reportedback to active service since that time. Mr Rex Absin (Instructor) is the only remaining faculty memberon study leave (without pay). He has been with Latrobe University in Melbourne, Australia pursuing aPhD degree before June 2000.
For its research staff, NIP also employs one University Researcher (W Garcia of Photonics Research)and three University Research Associates (R Cureg of Liquid Crystals, V Noguera of Plasma Physics,B Buenaobra of Instrumentation Physics). Wilson Garcia received his PhD degree from UP inDecember 2002. Engr. Buenaobra who became a regular UP employee in October 2002, has hiredprimarily to operate and maintain the NIP femtosecond laser facility. The NIP also hires a number ofundergraduate and graduate student assistants on a semestral appointments which are assigned to thevarious research laboratories based on need. Their number varies from one semester to anotheraccording to the availability of funds from the central UP Diliman administration. To qualify forassistantships, students must pass all their courses in the previous two semesters.
The following are the administrative load credit per semester of the various administrative positions:NIP Director (9 units), Deputy Director (3 units), Program Coordinators (1 unit), and SystemAdministrator (3 units). The NIP System Administrator is in-charged of the maintenance and upgradeof the NIP local-area network and represents the NIP in the technical committee of the ComputationalScience Research Center of the UP College of Science.
To provide administrative and technical support to the academic functions of NIP is a team of fourteenpersonnel that is under the direct supervision of Ms Flora Luis (the NIP administrative officer). MrArturo del Rosario was hired as the new NIP electrician in September 2002 vice Mr Robert Gray whoapplied for early retirement due to health reasons. Complete information about the names anddesignations of these personnel are found in: http://www.nip.upd.edu.ph/people/person_admin.html andhttp://www.nip.upd.edu.ph/people/person_tech.html.
C. Academic Programs
The NIP offers the following degree programs: BS Physics, BS Applied Physics, MA Physics, MSPhysics, and PhD (Physics). Aside from these regular offerings, the NIP co-implements the followinggraduate degree programs: M.S. Environmental Science and Ph.D. Environmental Science (with otherunits in the College of Science) and the MS Materials Science and PhD Materials Science (with theCollege of Engineering).
Every B.S. student is required to submit a thesis that is based on a research work which is done underthe supervision of an NIP faculty with an advanced physics degree. The undergraduate thesis ispresented to the public at the end of each semester in a scheduled program of the Institute. Anexamination panel consisting of the thesis supervisor and at least two faculty with advanced physicsdegrees, is tasked to evaluate the correctness and suitability of the thesis work.
Below is a summary of the number of students in the various academic degree programs offered by theInstitute in the last two academic years. Figures in parentheses correspond to the number of graduatesin a given term.
Table. Enrollment Data
B.S. Applied Physics The table indicates that the number of NIP graduate students has increased by 37.8% from June 2000to June 2002. Similarly, the combined undergraduate population has increased by 4.8% within thesame period. The NIP has the largest BS student population in the College of Science.
Most of our graduate students are full-time enrollees with scholarship support from the Department ofScience and Technology (DOST). A large number of our college freshmen are also supported byDOST scholarships. Starting in AY 2001 - 2002, six Intel scholarship awards are awarded to qualifiedNIP students via a program that is administered by the Philippine Foundation for Physics Incorporated.
In AY 2002 - 2003, the following students are recipients of the Intel scholarship awards: GeneBlantocas (PhD), Percival Almoro (PhD), May Lim (PhD), Dranreb Earl Juanico (MS), and JennetteMateo (BS) Since AY 2001-2002, the NIP has always aimed to improve the level of instructions in the generalphysics courses and to maintain the passing rate of its general physics classes (Physics 71, 72, and 73)to around 75% or better. This goal is to be achieved without compromising the quality of physicsinstruction and the academic freedom of instructors. A mechanism between the Office of the NIPDirector, the GPC chair, and the various course groups has been instituted to monitor classperformance after every long examination. Instructors are constantly advised to undergo seminars totest preparations offered by the Office of Instruction The following is the performance of the various classes during the 2nd semester of AY 2001-2001: The following is the performance of the various classes during the 1st semester of AY 2002-2003: The above information does not take into account that those with grades of 4.0 could have passed theremoval examinations given after the final examination period. If taken into consideration, the passingrates would definitely increase for the various lecture classes.
The student enrolment demand for slots in the three general physics laboratory courses (Physics 7X.1)have remained large and far outstrips the present capacity of NIP to absorb them. The NIP is alreadyoffering laboratory courses continuously from 8 am to 6 pm, Mondays to Fridays. Below is thedemand profile in the 2nd semester of AY 2002 - 2003, which reveals a serious need to enlarge thecurrent capacity (NO. OF STUDENTS) In Physics 71.1, the demand is 2.195 times larger than the absorption capacity. In Physics 72.1 and73.1 respectively the demand is 1.73 and 3.1 times larger. The inability of NIP to offer instruction in Physics 7X.1 subjects to all those who need it implies an ever increasing number of students whorequires a longer period of time (beyond the regular period stipulated in their curricula) to completetheir degree requirements in science and engineering.
The NIP has identified that the lack of laboratory rooms is the most serious reason behind the capacitycrisis. The second reason is the lack of laboratory set-ups which is currently being addressed using thefunds that are available in the CHED CoE project. The completion of the Phase II project involving thefirst two floors of the Research Wing of the new NIP building, is expected to solve the crisiseffectively.
D. Infrastructure and Facilities Development
The most notable infrastructure project in 2002 is the Phase II construction project which started in lateNovember 2002. The Phase II project concerns the completion of the first two floors of the ResearchWing of the new NIP Building along CP Garcia Avenue. The Research Wing consists of four floorswith a total floor area of almost 6000 square meters which is already 1.5 times larger than the currentNIP building. It houses not only the NIP research laboratories but also all the teaching laboratories inthe two BS programs and the service courses. Completion of construction works under the Phase IIproject is expected in September 2003.
The space that is allotted for teaching laboratories in the first two floors of the Research Wing willenable NIP to offer two simultaneous sections of the three Physics 7X.1 classes. This means doublingthe capacity of NIP to absorb the present student demand in the said courses. The same increase incapacity is expected in the laboratory courses in the BS Physics and Applied Physics programs.
Currently in the old NIP building, two laboratory rooms are shared by Physics 181/182, 185/186 and191/192 students.
Other development projects were also carried out in 2002 to improve the quality of life of the NIPcommunity and to effect an efficient use of NIP resources.
The asphalted NIP parking lot extension has become fully operational for the NIP community. The lotis sufficient for the parking of ten vehicles. The distribution of the NIP water supply has also improvedwith the installation of a pump facility and the rehabilitation of the main NIP tank in the roof top ofLlamas Hall.
The NIP library was transferred to Room 3100 (first floor, 3rd Pavilion) which was previously used as ageneral purpose stockroom. Room 3215 was converted into a faculty room for PhD faculty members.
The room at the basement of 3rd Pavilion Annex was reacquired from the College of Social Science andPhilosophy and rehabilitated for use as a stockroom.
To improve the presentation of class lectures, seminars and thesis defenses, the NIP acquired oneadditional LCD projector in addition to another one that was acquired in 2001. A notebook was alsopurchased for the same purpose. The two equipment were acquired using CHED-CoE funds.
E. Research Highlights
The NIP is the leading research center of physics and applied physics in the country. In 2002, NIP researchers published a record of 27 papers in ISI-abstracted journals representing 82% of allphysics papers from the Philippines. List of ISI publications of NIP in 2002 is presented in AppendixA. In 2002, NIP scientists were able to publish for two papers in the Physical Review Letters based ona research work that was completely done at NIP.
Figure 1 plots the yearly number of physics publications in ISI journals since 1993 for NIP and thePhilippines. Between 1993 and 2002, NIP has produced 86% of all ISI papers in physics. A steadyincrease in the publication number could be observed in the last three years. In 2002, a year-to-yearincrease of 68.7% has been accomplished.
Figure 1. Annual number of ISI publications
NIP researchers also gave 81 technical presentations (61% of total) in the 20th Physics Congress of theSamahang Pisika ng Pilipinas which was held in Naga City on 23-25 October 2002. The number ofNIP papers represents 71% of total which is roughly the same percentage as that the 19th SPPCongress. Appendix A1 presents a listing the international conferences attended by NIP faculty in theyear 2000.
NIP authors of papers in ISI-abstracted journals have also benefited from the Presidential Award forInternational Publications (for faculty and staff only) and the CHED Center of Excellence grant(including teaching associates and fellows). Each paper is awarded a maximum of PhP 50,000.00.
The amount is divided equally among the authors.
The first international patents were applied by NIP researchers in 2002. The UPD Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development assisted NIP researchers in the application procedure. Thepatents were assigned by the inventors to the University of the Philippines and Department of Scienceand Technology.
These patent applications are:1. Titanium nitride thin film formation on metal substrate by chemical vapordeposition in a magnetized sheet plasma source (modified by the internationalsearching authority to read: Method for formation of titanium nitride films) Application no. pct/ph02/00003Filing/priority date: 27 february 2002Applicants: Henry Ramos, PCASTRD, UP Diliman Separate patent applications have also been filed in Malaysia and Taiwan (which are not pct signatories), with thefollowing particulars:Malaysia: Application no. pi 20024041/ Filing date: 29 October 2002Taiwan: Application no. 91132002/ Filing date: 28 October 2002 2. Method for generating high-contrast images of semiconductor sites via one-photon optical beam-induced current imaging and confocal reflectance microscopy Application no. pct/ph02/00013Filing/priority date: 09 July 2002Applicants: C. Saloma, J Miranda, V Daria, UP Diliman, PCASTRDStatus: Entry into the national phase not later than 09 January 2005 (30 monthsfrom the priority date), and not later than 09 march 2004 for pct states whichhave retained the 20-month deadline.
3. Two-color (two-photon) excitation with focused excitation beams and a Raman shifter Application no. pct/ph02/00018Filing date: 27 September 2002Applicants: C. Saloma, W. Garcia, J. Palero , UP Diliman, PCASTRD The following NIP students received academic awards during the Recognition Program of the College ofScience on 21 April 2002: Christopher Monterola Most Outstanding PhD Graduate Peter John Rodrigo Most Outstanding MS Graduate Dranreb Earl Juanico Most Outstanding BS Physics Graduate Most Outstanding BS Applied Physics Graduate Dranreb Earl Juanico Best Thesis (BS Physics) Kristin Bautista BestThesis (BS Applied Physics) The following NIP personnel were recipients of the Gawad Chanselor in February 2002: Pinakamahusay ng Estudyante (Antas Gradwado)Christopher Monterola Pinakamahusay na Nilathalang PananaliksikM Quito, C Monterola & C. Saloma, "Solving N-Body Problems with Neural Networks,"Phys Rev Lett 86, pp. 4741-4744 (2001) Natatanging Imbensiyon at InobasyonJ Palero & W. Garcia - Development of a Raman Light Source The paper of V. Noguera and H. Ramos entitled, "Production efficiency of H- ions from a magnetizedsheet plasma source," received the best paper award (poster category) in the Joint International PlasmaSymposium of 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology, 15th Symposium onPlasma Science for Materials, 4th International Conference on Open Magnetic Systems for PlasmaConfinement (OS 2002) and 11th Korea Accelerator and Plasma Research Association in Jeju Island, Korea(1-4 July 2002), The NIP received an equipment grant of PhP 18M which was used to acquire: 1) Femtosecond laserfacility (PhP 12M), 2) High-field Hall facility (PhP 2M), 3) Electro-optic facility (PhP 1M), 4)ECR/photodetachment devices (PhP 1M), and 5) Repair of nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. The femtosecondlaser facility is operated by NIP as a primary light source for researchers in their sanctioned researchprojects. The laser facility is housed in Room 3111.
F. Extension Efforts & Alumni Relations
The voluntary services of NIP scientists are crucial to the continued growth of the Samahang Pisika ngPilipinas. The two-year terms of Prof Arnel Salvador and Dr Maricor Soriano as SPP President andSecretary-General respectively, ended on 31 December 2002. Dr Marlon Rosendo Daza and DrMarisciel Litong-Palima will assume the said SPP responsibilities on 1 January 2003. ProfessorZenaida Domingo chaired (term: one year) of the Physics Division of the National Research Council ofthe Philippines in 2002.
The Philippine Foundation for Physics, Inc. (PFPI) has continued the following fund raising activitiesfor NIP: 1) Sale of textbooks for the Physics 71 course series, and 2) Sale of laboratory manuals forPhysics 71.1, 72.1, and 73.1. The PFPI is a non-stock non-profit foundation that was established morethan five years ago by NIP alumni to promote the interest and well-being of their alma mater. Financialassistance (PhP 3,100 per person) was given by PFPI to NIP non-academic personnel in 2002. TheIntel Scholarship program for NIP students is also handled by the PFPI.
The NIP also providing space for the UP Physics Association (UPPA) which is a duly-recognizedacademic organization that is composed mostly of undergraduate physics students of UPD. The UPPAheld the following activities in 2001: 1) Physics Week (January), UPPAgibig (February), 3) FreshmanOrientation Program (May), 4) CHAOS & Bingo (September), and 5) Lantern Parade (December).
Miss Apple Grace Naig is the current UPPA President.
G. Prospects for 2003
Our vision for NIP has been defined clearly. The indicators for assessing whether the vision isachieved in 2005, have also been described. The general challenge in 2003 is to sustain theimprovements that were realized in the last two years in the areas of research, physics instruction andextension services. The realization of the NIP vision depends on the ability of the NIP community tosecure incremental but steady improvements.
In 2003, the NIP hopes to see increases in the number of BS Physics and Applied Physics graduatesthat is being produced, as result of the number of measures that has been implemented by the Office ofthe NIP Director in the past two years.
Construction of the new NIP building is expected to continue in 2003 with the availability of freshfunds from the Office of the UPD Chancellor, Office of the UP President and hopefully, even fromsympathetic legislators.
New research grants from the Philippine Foundation for Physics, Inc are expected to be available in2003. The aim of these grants is to encourage our non-tenured PhD faculty members to engage inexternally-funded research.
In 2003, the NIP will aim to increase the amount of research funds that is contributed by the (non-traditional) private sector including foreign organizations and agencies. This objective will beadequately achieved if NIP is able to package research proposals which are consistent with theobjectives of these funding agencies which are often specific.
Chapter II. Report of the Deputy Director for Academic Affairs
by Dr Ronald Banzon
2.1 Curricular Proposals 2.1.1 MA Physics Program
The proposal to remove the laboratory component of the course Physics 204.1 (Foundations ofModern Physics I) was approved by the UP Diliman University Council on its 77th meetingheld on 16 April 2002. This changes the credit units to four- (4 u.) from the original five units(5 u.). The proposal is found in Appendix H, page 1, of the proposed agenda for the meeting.
2.1.2 BS Physics and BS Applied Physics Program
2.1.2.1 Physics 71(Elementary Physics I) and Physics 101(Fundamental Physics I)
The proposal to have the same co-requisite requirement (Math 53 or its equivalent) for Physics71 and Physics 101 was approved by the UP Diliman University Council on its 77th meetingheld on 16 April 2002. The proposal is found in Appendix H, page 2, of the proposed agendafor the meeting.
2.1.2.2 Physics 104 (Modern Physics I)
The proposal to remove the Physics 112 (Mathematical Physics II) prerequisite requirement forPhysics 104 was approved by the UP Diliman University Council on its 77th meeting held on16 April 2002. The proposal is found in Appendix H, page 2, of the proposed agenda for themeeting.
The remaining prerequisite courses are Physics 103(Fundamental Physics III) and Math 121.1(Elementary Differential Equations) or its equivalent.
2.1.2.3 Applied Physics 181 and 182 (Physical Electronics I and II)
The proposal to change the course descriptions of Applied Physics 181 and 182 (PhysicalElectronics I and II) was approved by the UP Diliman University Council on its 77th meetingheld on 16 April 2002. The proposal is found in Appendix H, page 4, of the proposed agendafor the meeting.
The idea of the proposal was to have analog electronics topics covered in Applied Physics 181,while digital electronics topics will be studied in Applied Physics 182.
2.1.2.4 Change in Number of Units of Electives for the B.S. Physics Program
The proposal to change the number of units of Physics/App Physics electives, andScience/Math elective of the B. S. Physics Program was approved by the UP DilimanUniversity Council on its 77th meeting held on 16 April 2002. The proposal is found inAppendix H, page 3, of the proposed agenda for the meeting.
The number of units was changed from the fixed requirement of three units (3 u.) to a variablethree to five units (3-5 u.).
2.1.2.5 Biology 12 (Fundamentals of Biology II) as a Required Course
The proposal to remove Biology 12 (Fundamentals of Biology II) as a required course in allNIP sponsored undergraduate programs was approved by the UP Diliman University Councilon its 77th meeting held on 16 April 2002. The proposal is found in Appendix H, pages 2, 5,and 6, of the proposed agenda for the meeting. It was replaced by a GE (Math, Science &Technology) course.
2.1.2.6 Change in Curriculum Checklists for Undergraduate Programs
The proposed curriculum checklists for B. S. Physics, B. S. Applied Physics (MaterialsPhysics), and B. S. Applied Physics (Instrumentation Physics) was approved by the UPDiliman University Council on its 77th meeting held on 16 April 2002. The proposal is found inAppendix H, pages 7-12, of the proposed agenda for the meeting.
The updated checklists may be found in Appendix I.
2.1.2.7 Physics 10 (MST) (Physics and Astronomy for Pedestrians)
The institution of a GE course in physics, Physics 10 (MST) (Physics and Astronomy forPedestrians), was approved by the UP Diliman University Council on its 77th meeting held on16 April 2002. The proposal is found in Appendix GD, pages 1-3, of the proposed agenda forthe meeting.
Following is an excerpt from the proposal, indicating particulars of the course.
Physics and Astronomy for Pedestrians Course Description: A "walk-through" course for people who want to enjoy physics & astronomy Prerequisite: noneCredits: 3 Course Objectives:1) To introduce concepts from various sub-disciplines of physics and astronomy to students and to develop anappreciation of the position of mankind in the universe.
2) To update the student with the latest development in physics and astronomy.
3) To refine the student's understanding of the role of physics and its sub-disciplines in technological innovations and inthe advancement of other fields in the natural and social sciences. The latter, in turn, conditions other human activities,transforming processes by which humans interact.
3) To acquaint the student with the current state of physics & astronomy education and research in the Philippines.
4) To enable the student to understand the character and functions of science and technology and develop an appreciationof the key role of science and technology in national development.
2.1.2.8 The Movement for the Introduction of NST Courses
The College of Science Academic Affairs Committee started planning the institution ofNational Service Training Program (NSTP) courses for each institute/department of theCollege. It was suggested to propose courses that incorporate the field of specialization of thestudent, and at the same time consistent with the general principles of the NSTP.
A consultative meeting with freshmen and sophomore students of the Institute was held onWednesday, 4 December 2002 to generate ideas that may be utilized in the formulation of theproposed courses.
2.2 Developments in the Implementation of Undergraduate Programs 2.2.1 Recitation/Problem Solving Sessions for Physics 10x
A problem solving/recitation session has been introduced in all Physics 10x (Physics 101, 102,103, 104, and 105) classes as resources permit. The introduction of these sessions serves toincrease the degree of familiarity of students with particular applications of theoreticalrelations. It also minimizes the temptation, on the part of the instructor, of having a purelytheoretical lecture.
2.2.2 Retention Rules
The Secretary's Office of the College of Science did not yet have a convenient way of applyingthe rules for the determination of students to be retained in the undergraduate programs of theInstitute. A movement to computerize student records at the College is ongoing. In the meantime, it will be left for the advisers to determine and report students who do not meet therequirements for retention.
2.2.3 Applied Physics 195 and Applied Physics 195A
The Institute entered its second year of offering the courses Applied Physics 195 (SpecialTopics in Applied Physics: Modern Control Systems), and Applied Physics 195A (SpecialTopics in Applied Physics: Modern Control System II), as substitutes for EEE 101(ControlSystems Theory) and ECE 123 (Digital Instrumentation & Control Techniques) respectively.
Particulars of the courses have been submitted to the EEE department of the College ofEngineering and have been accepted as sufficient substitute courses.
The Institute intends to continue offering the course until a curricular proposal that eliminatesthe need for EEE courses in the B. S. Applied Physics (Instrumentation Physics) curriculum isapproved.
2.2.4 Late Undergraduate Thesis Advising for Students
As a response to the increasing number of advanced undergraduate students without a thesisadviser, the Institute started a program that seeks to assign students of Fourth-year standingand beyond to appropriate faculty members for thesis advising.
A minimum of fourth-year standing as a student of a NIP-sponsored program who is notattached to a research adviser may request the Institute to assign one for himself/herself. Theletter will be addressed to the Deputy Director for Academic Affairs containing the student'sresearch interest(s) and a list of suggested thesis advisers. The letter of application will includeas attachment a comprehensive True Copy of Grades (TCG). The applications were evaluatedat the start of the First Semester AY 2002-2003.
2.3 Undergraduate Thesis The undergraduate thesis presentation continues to follow the format of the past two years – atwenty-minute open forum and examination, and then a ten-minute deliberation of the panelmembers follows the thirty-minute presentation.
As much as possible, faculty members were not assigned consecutive presentations to avoiddelays in the schedule. This was a compromise from the suggestion of introducing a shortbreak between presentations, which would have required an extended schedule.
A total of twenty-three (23) presentations were made during the year. An increase of five (5)presentations from that of the previous year. Making the observation that this is larger than thetotal number of BS Physics presentations of the previous year makes the increase of almost28% more significant.
The table below (Table 1) summarizes the number of undergraduate theses presented duringthe year and that of the previous year enclosed in parentheses.
Table 1: Number of Undergraduate Thesis Presentations in 2002 and (2001)
Degree Course
BS Applied Physics Following are the presentations made during the academic year.
Second Semester AY 2001-2002
The Undergraduate Thesis Presentations for the Second Semester AY 2001-2002 was held on
Wednesday, 13 March and Saturday, 16 March 2002, at the NIP AVR. Following was the
schedule of presentations.
DAY 1: Wednesday, 13 March 2002
08:00 AMArciaga, Marko E. (BS Applied Physics)"Investigation of ExB Probe Parameters for Optimum Extraction of H- Ions from a MagnetizedSheet Plasma Source"Adviser: Dr. Henry J. RamosPanel: Dr. Roland Sarmago, Mr. Nathaniel Hermosa 09:00 AMBahague, Ricardo Jr. (BS Physics)"Confined Time-of-arrival Operators"Adviser: Dr. Eric GalaponPanel: Dr. Lorenzo Chan, Dr. Jose Perico Esguerra 10:00 AMBautista, Kristin Maria Angelus N. (BS Applied Physics)"Growth and Characterization of Liquid Phase Epitaxial p-Gallium Arsenide Layers and pn-junction"Adviser: Dr. Arnel SalvadorPanel: Dr. Ronald S. Banzon, Mr. Christopher Monterola 11:00 AMCadatal, Marilou M.(BS Applied Physics)"Theory and Application of Phase-shifting Digital Holography"Adviser: Dr. Marlon Rosendo H. DazaPanel: Dr. Maricor Soriano, Mr. Giovanni Tapang 12:00 NNCardinal, Ma. Gracita (BS Applied Physics)"Enhancement of H- ion Production with Xe Gas in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma"Adviser: Dr. Henry J. RamosPanel: Dr. Marlon Daza, Dr. Ludek Jirkovsky 01:00 PMCemine, Vernon Julius R. (BS Applied Physics)"Performance of the Sinusoid-crossing Sampling in Noise-assisted Weak Signal Detection"Adviser: Dr. Caesar SalomaPanel: Dr. Marlon Daza, Mr. Wilson Garcia 02:00 PMDomingo, Herbert B. (BS Physics)"The Time of Arrival Quantum-Classical Correspondence Problem for Arbitrary Arrival Point"Adviser: Dr. Eric A. GalaponPanel: Dr. Danilo Yanga, Dr. Jose Perico Esguerra DAY 2: Saturday, 16 March 2002
08:00 AMDungao, Jade R. (BS Applied Physics)"Holographic Animation of Two- and Three- Dimensional Images Using Angle-multiplexingina a Z-cut Fe-doped (0.05%) LiNbO3 Crystal"Adviser: Dr. Marlon Rosendo H. DazaPanel: Dr. Maricor Soriano, Ms. May Lim 09:00 AMEstonactoc, Melvin Ferrer (BS Applied Physics)"Electro-optic Characterization of Twisted-nematic Liquid Crystals Driven by a Frequency-varying Voltage Source"Adviser: Dr. Zenaida DomingoPanel: Dr. Caesar Saloma, Dr. Roy Tumlos 10:00 AMGabayno, Jacque Lynn F. (BS Applied Physics)"Two-wave Mixing in Dye-doped Nematic Liquid Crystal E7"Adviser: Dr. Marlon Rosendo H. DazaPanel: Dr. Luis Ma. Bo-ot, Dr. Roy Tumlos 11:00 AMJuanico, Dranreb Earl (BS Physics)"Allelomimesis: A Simple Mechanism for Self-organized Aggregation"Adviser: Dr. Caesar SalomaPanel: Dr. Ronald S. Banzon, Mr. Matthew George Escobido 01:00 PMMuldera, Joselito E. (BS Applied Physics)"Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Behavior with Different Surface Alignment Layers"Adviser: Dr. Zenaida DomingoPanel: Dr. Henry Ramos, Dr. Arnel Salvador 02:00 PMNakan, Rowanie A. (BS Applied Physics)"Synthesis of Diamond and Diamond-like Carbon Thin Films on Si(100) Substrates via PlasmaEnhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD)"Adviser: Dr. Henry J. RamosPanel: Dr. Luis Ma. T. Bo-ot, Ms. Michelle Bailon 03:00 PMNoguera, Virginia R.(BS Physics)"Sheet Plasma Negative Ion Source Production Efficiency Measurements Using SecondDerivative of I-V Traces"Adviser: Dr. Henry J. RamosPanel: Dr. Roland Sarmago, Mr. Armando Somintac 04:00 PMOblefias, Wilma R.(BS Applied Physics)"Reconstruction of Fluorescent Color Signal at Per Pixel Resolution Using Image Color andPrincipal Component Analysis"Adviser: Dr. Maricor Soriano, Dr. Caesar Saloma(co-adviser)Panel: Dr. Cynthia Saloma, Mr. Percival Almoro Summer 2002
The Undergraduate Thesis Presentations for Summer 2002 was held on Monday, 6 May 2002,at the NIP AVR. Following was the schedule of presentations.
09:00 AMGadjali, Maylene M. (BS Physics)"Gamma Radiation Effects on Thermotropic Transitions of Erythrocyte Lipids"Adviser: Dr. Zenaida B. DomingoPanel: Dr. Henry Ramos, Mr. Percival Almoro 10:00 AMGianan, Oamar Nanaig Y. (BS Applied Physics)"Ultrasound Imaging Simulation Using Exact Spatial Impulse Response Solutions and NeuralNetworks"Adviser: Dr. Maricor SorianoPanel: Mr. Johnrob Bantang, Mr. Nathaniel Hermosa II 11:00 AMInnis, Vallerie Ann A.(BS Physics)"Structural Effects of Estradiol on the Mitochondrial Membranes of Brain Cells of MiceIrradiated In Utero"Adviser: Dr. Zenaida B. DomingoPanel: Dr. Perico Esguerra, Mr. Armando Somintac 01:00 PMNaceno, Grace Anne K. (BS Physics)"Morphology of the Holographic Gratings in Dye-doped Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals"Adviser: Dr. Zenaida B. DomingoPanel: Mr. Elmer Estacio, Ms. May Lim First Semester AY 2002-2003
The Undergraduate Thesis Presentations for the First Semester AY 2002-2003 was held onWednesday, 2 October 2002, at the NIP AVR. Following was the schedule of presentations.
9:00 AMMa. Adoracion P. Manuel (BS Physics)"Holography Using a 639 nm Laser Diode"Adviser: Dr. Marlon Rosendo H. DazaPanel: Dr. L. Bo-ot, Dr. R. Sarmago 10:00 AMRoselyn S. Pabilonia (BS Applied Physics)"Numerical Simulations of Focusing Properties of a Lensed Optical Fiber"Adviser: Dr. Marlon Rosendo H. DazaPanel: Dr. Maricor Soriano, Dr. Arnel Salvador 11:00 AMJennifer Ranay (BS Physics)"Optimization of Hydrogen Plasma Parameters for Negative HydrogenIon Extraction in a Plasma Sputter-type Negative Ion Source"Adviser: Dr. Henry RamosPanel: Dr. Jose Perico Esguerra, Dr. Ronald S. Banzon (vice Dr. Zenaida Domingo) 01:00 PMMichael Reuben C. Solis (BS Physics)"New Results in Tsallis Statistical Mechanics"Adviser: Dr. Jose Perico H. EsguerraPanel: Dr. Jose Magpantay, Dr. Eric Galapon 2.4 Undergraduate Program Student Profile The NIP continues to have the largest undergraduate student population in the College ofScience for the second year in a row. Data from the Secretary's Office of the College indicatesthat the total number of undergraduate students for the combined undergraduate programs ofthe NIP is 329 for the first semester (IB is a close second with 308), and 319 for the secondsemester (IB is second with 295) for AY 2002-2003.
Table 2 shows the distribution of students by year of admission during the First Semester,while Table 3 shows the same for the Second Semester AY 2002-2003 and for AY 2001-2002enclosed in parentheses. Similar data from the Secretary's Office of the College of Science maybe found in Appendix II.
The total number of third year standing students (3rd and 4th year by year of admission)continues to be large, prompting a continued offering of a larger class size for third year levelcourses. As reported in the previous year, this sustained number of students beyond the thirdyear strains the available resources for instruction, especially those with a laboratorycomponent.
Table 2: Total Enrolment for the First Semester AY 2002-2003 & (2001-2002)
Table 3: Total Enrolment for the Second Semester AY 2002-2003 &(2001-2002)
From data in tables 2 and 3, we may note a nominal increase in the total number of studentsbeyond the second year (third year and higher). For the First semester, the current academicyear had one more student compared to last year's total (146 to 147), while the Secondsemester had five more (138 to 143). A more significant difference may be found in thenumber of students beyond the third year (fourth year and higher). The First semester of thecurrent academic year had fourteen (14) more students compared with the previous year (86 to100), while the Second semester had sixteen (16) more (80 to 96).
The increase in the number of students beyond the third year suggests a need for an increasednumber of students to be accommodated by faculty/research groups for undergraduate thesisadvising.
Table 4A: Total Freshman Enrolment for the First Semester and Number of
Graduates for the Academic Years Starting 1997-2001
BS Applied Physics Tables 4A and 4B shows extracted data from reports of the Secretary's Office of the College ofScience, indicating the number of freshmen and graduates for the academic year over the pastfew years. The numbers of graduates are enclosed in parentheses. Tables have been reportedlast year with the column for 2001-2002 now with data for the number of graduates.
It is a bit disturbing to note that the number of graduates for the AY 2001-2002 was nineteen(19) only, given that the number of students in their fifth year and beyond during the secondsemester of that year was forty-seven (47). This parameter may be monitored in the comingyears to evaluate the efficacy of instituted programs or suggests the introduction of newpolicies.
The number of graduates of the recently concluded academic year (2001-2002) shows a slightdecrease in number. The decrease is not expected to be representative of a trend since thenumber of students retained beyond the third year has been shown to increase.
Table 4B: Total Freshman Enrolment for the First Semester and Number of
Graduates for the Academic Years Starting 1992 - 1996
BS Applied Physics Choosing to define "graduation rate" as the number of graduates of an academic year over thenumber of freshmen five years earlier. This rate may be calculated from Tables 4A and 4Bfrom the academic year ending 1998 to 2002. In percentage, these calculations yield insuccession about 20 (13/64), 21 (16/75), 14 (6/42), 28 (22/79), and 26 (19/74) for the past fiveyears. A significant increase in the graduation rate has been realized in the last two years. Theincrease in the graduation rate was coupled with an actual increase in the number of graduates.
It would not be surprising to have an estimated graduation rate for the current academic year(2002-2003) that is smaller than that for the academic year ending 2002, due to the largenumber of AY 1998-1999 freshmen (134, from Table 4A). The same would be true for thegraduation rate for AY 2003-2004 (129 freshmen during AY 1999-2000).
The sum of the number of third and fourth year students was used previously to estimate thenumber of graduates in future years. The influence, in terms of graduation rate, is to be realizedtwo years later. From Figure 1, we note that a significant increase in the sum of third and fourthyear students occurred during the AY 2000-2001, when it seems to have saturated. From theseconsiderations, we expect a significant increase in the number of graduates by the end of thecurrent academic year.
Sum of Third and Fourth Year Students
Number of Students
AY (Beginning Year)
Figure 1 Sum of third and fourth year students in NIP undergraduate programs
2.5 Service Courses The laboratory manuals for Physics 7x.1 courses were again updated under the supervision ofDr. Maricor Soriano.
So far, the Institute was provided a single review copy of the text by Resnick and Halliday forevaluation. The acquisition of more review copies, through C&E Publishing, Inc. , has notmaterialized due to some difficulties with the local office of the publisher. The number ofcandidate texts for review will be increased during the coming academic year. Arrangementsfor them will be made during the summer break.
2.5.2 Physics 7x and 7x.1
The program to monitor the passing rate of traditional service courses of the Institute, with atarget of about seventy-five percent (75%) of the total number of initial enrollees, is now in itssecond academic year.
A summary of data reported by Mr. Percival Almoro, chair of the General Physics Committee,for the student performance in Physics 7x and Physics 7x.1 courses is shown in Tables 6 and 7.
The target passing-rate of at least 75% was finally achieved for all courses during the SecondSemester AY 2001-2002, as shown in the last column of Table 6.
Table 6: Student Performance Second Semester AY 2001-2002
Table 7 shows the First Semester data for the current and previous academic year. Most of theservice courses had a passing rate roughly equal to that of the previous year. The mostsignificant change was that for Physics 72, where we had practically 70% passing compared tothe previous year's 60%.
Table 7: Student Performance First Semester AY 2002-2003 and (First Semester AY 2001-2002)
The service course enrolment for the past three years is presented in Table 8. The averagenumber of students per section during the first semester has remained virtually constant formost courses. The significant exception is Physics 73, where we note a 35% reduction from thepast two years. The total number of students taking the course also decreased significantly duelargely to changes in other CS programs that removed Physics 73 as a required course.
It may be that a more reasonable number of students per section of a lecture class would beabout eighty (80). In the hope of approximating this class size, the distribution of the number ofsections for the service courses may be modified to reduce further the average class size ofPhysics 71. This is a plan that still merits further consideration.
Table 8: Service Courses Enrolment for First and Second Semester AY 2002-2003, [First and
Second Semester AY 2001-2002], and (First and Second Semester AY 2000-2001)
Number of Sections Number of Students Average Number ofStudents per Section The ideal average class size of eighteen (18) for laboratory courses has been achieved forPhysics 72.1, and those for Physics 71.1 and Physics 73.1 are just about to get there. Thoughany excess beyond 18 indicates that there are more students who were unable to enlist in thosecourses – the excess being granted by a Director's prerogative.
2.5.3 Physics 103 and Physics 104 for College of Engineering Students
A reduced number of students have been recorded for the past few years in Physics 103 and
Physics 104 for engineering students. It may be possible to offer a single section in the next
academic year.
The College of Science still utilizes its faculty for enlistment. It is hoped that thisactivity, and those associated with it, will cease from being part of the regular workloadof the faculty of the College of Science.
Chapter III. Report of the Deputy Director for Research and Extension
by Dr Arnel Salvador
In 2002 we broke new grounds in the area of patent application and in obtaining external funding from theprivate industry. These two milestones are in line with NIP's goals of obtaining some financialindependence from traditional government support and increased visibility of NIP outside of the academesector. The seeking of patents based on research work done at NIP is seen as a potential avenue forfinancially compensating the researchers, as well as the University for the support it has given to NIP . Thefinancial support of the research activities of NIP from the private industry has been wanting for severalyears but in 2002 the NIP, through PFPI, worked hard to obtain an equipment grant from Intel PhilippinesInc., amounting to some EU155,000. This represents the biggest commitment that Intel Philippines Inc.,has made to an educational institution in the Philippines.
This year NIP faculty applied for three international patents. A US patent was obtained by Dr. H. Ramosfor a process on TiN deposition using a magnetized sheet plasma. Dr. Saloma and Dr. Daria. applied fora patent on single photon optical beam induced current (OBIC) spectroscopy to probe defects insemiconductor integrated circuits , and Dr. Saloma , Dr. Garcia and J. Palero applied for a patent for ahydrogen raman shifter as a source for two color excitation.
With the assistance of the Philippine Foundation for Physics Inc, the NIP was able to secure an equipmentdonation from Intel Philippines consisting of a streak camera,a monochromator and an autocorrelatorvalued at EU 155,000. This equipment will be used in tandem with the PhP 12 M femtosecond laser faciltythat NIP acquired through the UP Laboratory Modernization Program. The UP Board of Regents haspassed a resolution accepting the donation and Intel Philippines has recently made an initial downpaymentfor the equipment. An understanding has also been made for the funding of two- one year researchprojects amounting to PhP1.2 million.
In 2002 we also saw the arrival, upgrade and installation of equipment purchased through the UPLaboratory Modernization Program:Phase 1. The money was used to purchase the following : 1. various parts for the setup of an electron cyclotron resonance facility and the establishment of a photo detachment diagnostics facility in the Plasma Physics laboratory ( PhP1M) 2. optical accessories for the electro-optic characterization of liquid crystals at the Liquid Crystal Laboratory (PhP 1M) 3. closed cycle helium cryostat and accessories for high field magnetic susceptibility set up for the Condensed matter Physics Laboratory (PhP 2M) 4. repair of the Nd:Yag laser of the Photonics research laboratory (PhP 1M)5. optical accessories for routing of the visible output of the Nd:Yag Laser to the Plasma Physics Laboratory ( Php 1M) 6. Establishment of a femtosecond laser facility (Php 12M).
The femtosecond laser facility is a joint user facility of the National Institute of Physics and accessible
for use by its research groups. It consist of a Spectra-Physics Millenia® Vs compact diode-pumped
Nd:YVO4, laser , a Spectra-Physics Tsunami® mode-locked laser, and a Spectra-Physics 3980-4
Femtosecond Frequency Doubler. The facility is capable of producing 80fs pulses at a repetition rate of 82
MHz with peak powers of 750 mw in the the 720-850nm range, and 250 fs pulses with peak powers of
200 mw in the 390-420 nm range. The 5-watt ouput of the Millenia may also be used to drive the Spectra-
Physics 3900S Ti:sapphire laser. This unit outputs within the same range as the Tsunami, but with a CWoperation. The facility is housed in a room between the Instrumentation Physics and Photonincs ResearchLaboratories. Its maintenance for the year 2002 was shouldered by a PhP 1M grant provided by the UPDiliman Chancellor's Office. It is expected that the various research laboratories who will need the servicesof the facility will provide additional funding for its maintenance. The femtosecond laser facility wasformally opened on .Nov.22, 2002.
As external research groups, the NIP has set up a UP trust account for better record keeping. All paymentsfor the use of NIP equipment will now be deposited to this trust account.
Finally , the NIP continues to strive for increased and better quality research outputs. In 2002 the numberof ISI publications rose to 27 compared to 19 in 2001. The works of our faculty were also presented ininternational conferences thanks in part through funding from the CHED grant . As more of our facultymembers are becoming active in having their works published , the Institute is now moving towards thegoal of having increased journal citations for researches done at NIP. A conscious effort is being made thatthe research works be published in ISI journals which have high impact factors and citations in theirrespective fields.
Chapter IV. Report of the Deputy Director for Resources and Facilities
by Dr Luis Ma. Bo-ot
In 2002, the duties and functions of the Deputy Director for Resources and Facilities (DDFR) were assigned to two members of the Institute. Dr. Maricor Soriano assumed the positionof Deputy Director from January to May and Dr. Luis Ma. T. Bo-ot assumed the position fromJuly until December.
During the term of Dr. Soriano, the guidelines for rental of NIP rooms by non-NIP persons was established which led to the opening of an NIP Trust Account No. 9264-884-995-005 with UPDiliman Accounting Office. Proceeds to this account will be used for subsequent improvement ofNIP Facilities. The established room rates are: Rms. 3202 and 3207 120 seating capacity, aircon P 80/ half hour
80 seating capacity, aircon Rms. 4226, 4228, 4230, 4236, 4238 40 seating capacity, non-aircon Overhead projector or sound system Waste-segregated trash bins were distributed in all corridors. Dr. Soriano also obtained significant discounts from PEI (Philippine Electrical Industries) for the repair of two Tektronixoscilloscopes. A second LCD projector was also procured to be used primarily for regular thesesdeliberations and for the instruction of the new course Physics 10. Plans for additional parking tobe located in the area across the street of the Llamas Hall facade were also drawn up and thesewere implemented by the first semester.
A key project initiated by Dr. Soriano in February was the request for 40 new computers to be used in teaching the Elementary Physics Lecture and Lab courses, the Advanced Physics Laband the Physical Electronics Lab. In line with the NIP efforts to modernize experimental set-ups inthe labs, the 40 computers where purchased to support teaching and lab instruction. Thesecomputers including peripherals amounting to around P 1.14M were requested and charged to theCHED National Center for Excellence Program of the NIP. The hardware is broken down to 32units of computers with Intel Pentium 1.7 GHz processor, 80GB Seagate HDD, 128MB SDRAMand 32MB VGA card and another 8 units of the same specifications but already with an MS OfficeMedia Kit already installed.
The computers are now being used for interfaced experiments, simulations, numericalcalculations, presentations, and demonstrations. Included in the acquisition amount is apurchase of a proper software and Microsoft XP was chosen due to its inclusive softwarepackages especially those related to visualization. Consultations with MicrosoftPhilippines resulted in the application for Microsoft XP under the so-called MSDNAcademic Alliance, a feature of which is that a large number of NIP computers are allowed to be legitimate users of XP. Thus other NIP computers can also make use of thesoftware. The price for the license is P 46,000 yearly, inclusive of VAT.
The package consists of Windows 98, ME 2000 and XP operating systems, programming languages such as Visual C++ and Visual Basic, and diagram-drawing tools such as VisioProfessional. These various software is useful for courses requiring numerical simulations, visualpresentations and user interfaces. Demo videos have been created and interactive demos are beingused in lectures. The teaching labs are currently rewriting the elementary physics lab manuals toincorporate the use of computers in data gathering and analysis. Peripherals like 3 printers, ascanner and UPS were also included in the purchase.
The 40 computers are distributed to the labs as follows: Elementary Physics Lab Microcomputer Lab General Physics Committee Upon procurement of the 40 computers by the end of the first semester, they were distributed to the respective labs. For the elementary physics laboratories, since there will be aninterfacing with the experiments, overhead trays for the wires were planned and are now currentlybeing installed. These are being done utilizing in-house resources and personnel.
More importantly, from January to May, the plans for the New NIP Building (NNIP) along C.P. Garcia were finalized. These plans formed the basis for the eventual restarting of theconstruction of the NNIP in September last year. Actually the NNIP in its current phase ofconstruction is a resizing and redesigning of the original plans circa 1995, and it was during theterm of Dr. Soriano that the revised plans were made ready for the eventual bidding and restart ofthe construction. Included in these revisions during the first parts of the year were the correctionsto the electrical power requirements of the NNIP. Please refer to Appendix G for a copy of therevised plans.
Thus during the latter half of the year, most of the work of Dr. Bo-ot as DDFR centered on the implementation of the NNIP. Upon notice of available budget from the Office of theChancellor (OC), coordination work with the Office of the Campus Architect (OCA) concerningthe cost estimates and with Arch. Nakpil on the plans themselves were carried out. In order to actas guide for future requests for budget, the NNIP was broken down to phases each with acorresponding estimate. OCA and Arch. Nakpil presented costs estimates and these are presentedin Appendix H. A main difference between the cost estimates is the inclusion of site developmentfrom OCA. This includes fencing, road network and parking that are important for the eventualnormal NNIP operations.
The NNIP was then bidded out and construction formally restarted on November 22. This is Phase 2 of the NNIP and the projected duration of construction is one year. The successfulbidder is Newco Builders and Development Corporation. The construction of NNIP Phase 2 coversthe completion of the first two floors of the Research Wing of the NNIP. The ground floor houses the Plasma Physics Research lab, the Extended Liquid Crystal Physics Lab, the Computer PhysicsLab, the Advanced Physics Lab, the Physical Electronics Lab, an 80-seating capacity classroom,the Machine Shop and a part of the Administration. The second floor contains all the ElementaryPhysics Labs, a 50-seating capacity classroom, the Lab Supply Room and the Administration. Ifonly Phase 2 is to be made operational, the areas intended for the Machine Shop will betemporarily occupied by Administration while that of the Administration on the 2nd floor willtemporarily become the Faculty offices for those who will be holding classes in the NNIP.
The figures related to the project are Net Budget for NNIP Phase 2 Balance from Budget Initially, the discrepancy between the estimate and the amount bidded underwent re- evaluation by the OCA but was eventually awarded to Newco. Also, the NIP plans to request thatthe balance from the budget of around P 8.5 M be included in Phase 2 as additional works.
NNIP Phase 2 is now an ongoing construction project. There is a weekly meeting held at the site to monitor the progress of the construction. The members of the meeting represent the NIP,Arch. Nakpil, the OCA and Newco. The NIP Director presides over these meetings. The DDFRfollows the construction operations closely, so far the activities are: Attending the testing of material samples to be used ii) Following the discussions during the site inspections which is part of the weekly meetings between the architect's consultants and the contractor on details of parts of the buildingsystem iii) Acting as liaison on behalf of NIP for paperwork between the Contractor and UPiv) Documenting the construction for NIP file purposesv) Acting on related matters, i.e. use of the balance from budget, and continuance for the completion the NNIP.
The plans for the furnishings for the NNIP Phase 2 are also being drawn up and initial estimates are placed at around P 3.5M (See Appendix I.) The NIP has already made representationto the OC regarding this and a final estimate is to be submitted by February 2003. Aside fromthis, there is process of actual transfer to the NNIP. Although there is no current estimate and clearplan as to how this is to be carried out, this item has been brought up during NIP managementmeetings and during the NIP Faculty Workshop. It has also been mentioned already to the OC.
The DDFR was also entasked to assist in planning and facilitating the Faculty Workshop held in Bolinao last August. Improvements in NIP Llamas Hall include the hiring of an in-houseelectrician, Mr. Arturo del Rosario, the provision of a bike shed and the replacement of the waterclosets especially in the women's comfort room. The NIP was able to reuse roofing materials for the bike shed and the water closets available from discarded items in SPCMO. The NIP alsopurchased a water pump to make its water supply more dependable.
APPENDIX A. PUBLICATIONS
A1. ISI-abstracted Journals (27)

1. G. Blantocas, H. J. Ramos & M. Wada, "Extraction and profile analysis of hydrogen-like helium ions
in a magnetized sheet plasma", Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73 (2), pp 976-978 (2002).
2. H. Ramos & R. Awayan, "Nitride formation using a magnetized sheet plasma source", Vacuum, 65 (3-
4), pp 397-402 (2002).
3. E.Estacio, M. Bailon, A. Somintac, R. Sarmiento & A. Salvador, "Observation of high junction
electric fields in modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures by room temperature photoreflectance
spectroscopy," J Appl Phys 91 (6), pp. 3717-3720 (2002)
4. B.A.Kniehl, C Palisoc, & A. Sirlin, "Elimination of threshold singularities in the relation between on-
shell and pole widths," Phys Rev D. 66, 057902, 2002.
5. E Galapon, "Pauli's theorem and quantum canonical pairs: the consistency of a bounded, self-adjoint
time operator canonically conjugate to a Hamiltonian with non-empty point spectrum," Proc. R. Soc. Lond.
A 458, pp 451-472 (2002).
6. A. Morales, D. Yanga & S. Kurihara, "The hole spectral function in the finite temperature Green's
function scheme, " J Superconductivity. 15, pp 277-280 (2002).
7. E. Galapon, "Self-adjoint Time Operator is the Rule for Discrete Semibounded Hamiltonians," Proc. R.
Soc. Lond. A 458, 2671-2689 (2002)
8. N Hayazawa, A Tarun & S Kawata, "Near-Field Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy using Side
Illumination Optics", J Appl Phys 92, 6983 - 6986 (2002)
9. C Monterola, M Lim, J Garcia & C Saloma, "Feasibility of a Neural Network as Classifier of
Undecided Respondents in a Public Opinion Survey," Int. J Public Opinion Res 14 (2) pp. 222-229 (2002).
10. P. Rodrigo, M. Lim & C. Saloma, "Direction-sensitive subwavelength displacement measurements at
diffraction-limited resolution," Opt Lett 27, pp. 25-27 (2002)
11. C Monterola, M Lim, J Garcia & C Saloma, "Accurate forecasting of the undecided population in a
public opinion poll," J Forecasting 21, pp 435-449 (2002)
13. G. Tapang & C. Saloma, "Behavior of the point spread function in photon-limited confocal
microscopy," Appl Opt 41, pp. 1534-1540 (2002)
14. C Saloma, "Reply to comment of Schins and Muller," Appl Opt 41, 1996-1997 (2002).
15. M Lim & C Saloma, "Emergence of hysteresis in a network of nonhysteretic agents with continuous
responses," Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 038701 (2002).
16. G. Tapang & C. Saloma, "Dynamic range enhancement of an optimized 1-bit AD converter," IEEE
Trans. Circuits Syst II 49, pp. 42-47 (2002).
17. VR Daria, J Miranda & C Saloma, "High-contrast images of semiconductor sites via one-photon
optical beam induced current imaging and confocal reflectance microscopy," Appl Opt 41, pp. 4157-4161
(2002)
18. VR Daria, C Saloma & S Kawata, "Excitation with a focused, pulsed optical beam in scattering
media: reply to comment," Appl Opt 41, 4652-4654 (2002).
19. M Lim & C Saloma, " Confocality condition in two-color excitation microscopy with two focused
beams," Optics Commun 207, 111-120 (2002).
20. GJ Perez, G Tapang, M Lim & C Saloma, "Streaming, disruptive interference and power-law
behavior in the exit dynamics of confined pedestrians," Physica A 312/3-4, pp 609-618 (2002).
21. J Palero, W Garcia & C Saloma, "Two-color (two-photon) excitation fluorescence with two confocal
beams and Raman shifter", Opt Commun 211, pp 57-63 (2002).
22. J Bantang, M Lim, C Monterola & C Saloma, "Gravity-assisted segregation of granular materials of
equal mass and size," Phys Rev E 66, 041306 (2002)
23. C Monterola & C Saloma, "Noise-driven manifestation of learning in mature neural networks" Phys
Rev Lett 89, 188102 (2002)
24. R Pobre & C Saloma, "Radiation force on a nonlinear microsphere by a tightly-focused Gaussian
beam," Appl Opt 41, pp. 7694-7701 (2002).
25. M Soriano, W Oblefias & C Saloma, "Fluorescence spectrum recovery from image color and non-
negativity constraint," Opt Express 10, pp. 1458-1464 (2002)
26. BA Kniehl, C Palisoc, and L Zwirner, "Associated Production of Heavy Quarkonia and Electroweak Bosons
at Present and Future Colliders,," Phys. Rev. D66, 114002 (2002).
27. A. Tarun, MRH Daza,. N. Hayazawa, Y. Inouye & S. Kawata, "Apertureless optical near-field fabrication
using an atomic force microscope on photoresists," Appl Phys Lett 80, pp 3400-3402, (2002).
A2. PROCEEDINGS OF INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES
Oral presentations (4)
1. E.A. Galapon, Self-adjoint time operators: What could have we been missing while Pauli's theorem was in force?, International Conference on
Time and Matter, Venice International University, Venice Italy, 11-17 August 2002
2. C. Saloma, "Efficient two-color fluorescence excitation with two confocal beams and a Raman shifter," Proc Focus on Microscopy 2002,
Kaohsiung, Taiwan (April 8 - 10, 2002)
3. C. Saloma, "Two-color fluorescence excitation with two confocal beams and a Raman shifter," The Asian Symposium on Biomedical Optics and
Photomedicine BOPM2002, Sapporo, Japan (October 21-23, 2002)
4. H. J. Ramos, A. Mendenilla & M. Yambot, Metal ions from surface production-type multicusp negative ion source, Proceedings of the
International Workshop on Particle Beams and Plasma Interaction on Materials, Chiang Mai, Thailand, January 31-February 1, 2002, pp. 22-24.
(oral)
Poster presentations (18)
1. A. Somintac, E.Estacio & A. Salvador, Observation of Blue Shifted Photoluminescence in stacked InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots, XII MBE
International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy, September 16-20, 2002 in SanFrancisco, California, USA (poster presentation)
2. V. R. Noguera & H. J. Ramos, Production efficiency of H- ions from a magnetized sheet plasma source, Abstracts of the Joint International
Plasma Symposium of 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST), 15th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials
(SPSM), 4th International Conference on Open Magnetic Systems for Plasma Confinement (OS 2002) and 11th Korea Accelerator and Plasma
Research Association (KAPRA), July 1-4, 2002, Jeju Island, Korea, p. 89. (Received Best Paper Award, poster category)
3. M Fernandez & H. J. Ramos, Effect of hyperthermal negative hydrogen ions on silicon substrates, Abstracts of the 13th international Conference
on Ion Beam Modification of Materials, September 1-6, 2002, Kobe, Japan, p. 70. (poster)
4. M. Calix, Z. Domingo, "Monte Carlo Simulation of a Binary Lyotropic Liquid Crystal System, " Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference,
Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)
5. J. Joson, L. Davila, Z. Domingo, "Kinetics of the Non-Isothermal Crystallization of Coco-Based Cholesteryl Ester," Proc 19th International Liquid
Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)
6. R. Sandagon, M. Estonactoc, O. Fernandez, Z. Domingo, "Electrooptical Properties and Vhr Characteristics of Polymer Network-Stabilized
Nematic E7 Liquid Crystal," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)
7. C. L. Mahinay, L. Davila, Z. Domingo, L. Cada, "Electro-Optic Characterization of E48:TM74A:PMMA PDCLCs," Proc 19th International Liquid
Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)
8. B. Rara, C. Macale, Z. Domingo, "Curvature-Elastic Modulus of Soya Lecithin," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh,
U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)
9. S. Johnson, S. Delica, Z. Domingo, "Liquid Crystal Mixture Based on E48 and Castor Oil," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference,Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)10. F. Escario, S. Delica, Z. Domingo, "Surface Anchoring Effects on the Performance of Nematic Liquid Crystals With A PhotoconductingPolymeric-Layered Substrate, " Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)11. S. Delica, C. Blanca, "Angular Distribution of Multiply-Scattered Light in a Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal: A Monte Carlo Model," Proc 19thInternational Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)12. S. Delica, C. Blanca, "Monte Carlo Model of Light Scattering in Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal: Polarization Effects," Proc 19th InternationalLiquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)13. M. Palamine, C. Macale, M. Estonactoc, S. Delica, Z. Domingo, "Effect of Drug Concentration on the Formation of Membrane Bilayer inLyotropic System," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)14. O. Fernandez, A. Francia, M. Estonactoc, Z. Domingo, "Electrically Induced Reorientation In A Polymer Network-Stabilized Nematic E7 LiquidCrystal System," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)15. G. Cureg, A. Cruz, L.Cada, Z. Domingo, "Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Formulations (Coconut-Based Cholesteryl Ester & Tm74A): Thermal andOptical Characterization," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)16. A.B. Tumbokon*, L.G. Cada, Z. Domingo, "Formulation of Thermochromic CANCE-E7," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference,Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)17. A. Francia Jr., N. Hermosa, G. Naceno, Z. Domingo, "Holographic Gratings in Polymer-LC Composites," Proc 19th International Liquid CrystalConference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)18. L. Davila, R. Marco, L. Cada, Z. Domingo, "Surface Free Energy and Pretilt Angle of Nematic E7 on Rubbed and/or Unpolarized Uv IrradiatedPolyimide," Proc 19th International Liquid Crystal Conference, Edinburgh, U.K (29 June - 6 July 2002)19. N. Hermosa II, M R Daza, "Storage of Micro-Holograms in a Methyl Red Doped Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal", Proc. of the 4th JointInternational Symposium on Optical Memory and Optical Data Storage (6-11 July 2002) A3. DOMESTIC JOURNALS
1. M. Olbinado, L.J. Guerra and R. Sarmago, Synthesis of Bulk SuperconductingMagnesium Diboride, Science Diliman Vol 14 (1) pp. 17-20(2002) 2. Marcos M.S., Soriano M., W. Oblefias, M. Quibilan and C. Saloma, Color-Texture Image Analysis of Coral Reefs, Science Diliman 13, 50 ( July-Dec 2001).
A3. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
(20th SPP Physics Congress, 23-25 October 2002, Naga City)

Optimum Growth Conditions for Liquid Phase Epitaxial Growth of Superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+ 7KLQ )LOPV Ambanta, I.R.O., Guerra, L.J.D. Cueto, A.V. Sarmago, R.V., pp.37-40 Investigation of the Hysteresis Loss Peak in the Temperature Dependence of the AC Magnetic Susceptibility of Bulk MgB2 Olbinado, M.P.,Singidas, B.G., Sarmago, R.V., pp.347-349 New Definitive Complex AC Magnetic Susceptibility Features of YBCO from an Improved Lock-in Measurement Technique Singidas, B.G.,Sarmago, R.V., pp.256-259 Confronting the Issue of Phase Drift and Tuning Sarmago, R.V. pp. Synthesis of Mg1-xKxB2 from MgB2 and KCl Powders Olbinado, M.P., pp.232-235 Electrical Dissipation and Fluctuation Magnetoconductivity on a Bi2Sr2CaCu2o8+ Film Hinojales, E.J.M.Dela Cruz. C. Sarmago, R.V., pp.
360-363
A New Interpretation on the Meissner transition of Bi-2212 in Ac Magnetic Field Bernaldez, F.L., Sarmago, R.V., pp.265-268 Effects of Sintering Time and Temperature on the TC and Microstructure of Bulk MgB2 Olbinado, M.P.,Guerra, L.J.D., Sarmago, R.V.,pp.240-243 Frequency and Applied Field Dependence of In-phase and Out-of-phase Odd Harmonic Susceptibilities of YBCO Torralba, M.V.S., Sarmago,R.V., pp.202-205 10.) Transport Current Effects on Bi2212 Superconducting Transition Ronulo, J.B., Dela Cruz. C.R., Sarmago, R.V., pp. 264-266 11.) Magnetoresistance profile of a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O 7KLQ ILOP 2Q WKH EHKDYLRU RI WKH SRWHQWLDO EDUULHU LQ WKH IOX[ FUHHS SURFHVV Dela Cruz. C.R., Sarmago, R.V., pp.97-100 12.) Hall Voltage Sign Reversal in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+ 7KLQ )LOP Dela Cruz, Aaron Paul C., Dela Cruz. C.R., Sarmago, R.V., pp.167-169 13.) Harmonic Susceptibilities of MgB2 Torralba, M.V.S.,Olbinado, M.P., Sarmago, R.V., pp.367-370 14.) Calculation of absorption coefficient of strained MBE grown InGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well by transmission spectroscopy Mateo, J.N., Somintac, A., Estacio, E., Salvador, A., pp.45-47 15.) Liquid Phase Epitaxy of Zn-doped GaAs Bautista, K.M.A.N., Casco, M. F., Mateo, J.N., Salvador, A., pp.105-108 16.) Self Assembled Epitaxial Growth of Quantum Dots via Molecular Beam Epitaxy Somintac, A., Podpod, A., Estacio, E., Salvador, A., pp.9-12 17.) The Effect of Arsenic on MBE-grown Modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures Patricio, M.G., Estacio, E., Somintac, A., Podpod, A., Dorilag, R., Salvador, A.A., pp.236-239 18.) Confined Power Law Behavior in Holographic Storage with a Nonplanar Reference Beam Guerrero, R. A., Arangcon, R.B., Dungao, J.R., Daza, M.R.H., pp.226-230 19.) Holographic animation of two- and three-dimensional images using angle multiplexing in a z-cut Fe-doped (0.05%) LiNbO3 crystal Dungao, J.R., Guerrero, R. A., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.60-63 20.) Effects of Extraction and Lens Voltages in Extracting H- Ions from a Magnetized Sheet Plasma using an ExB Probe Arciaga, M.E., Mendenilla, A.G., Blantocas, G.Q., Ramos, H.J., pp.182-184 21.) Prediction of Protein Secondary Structure Using Two-Layered Neural Networks Monterola, Christopher P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp.280-284 22.) Microscopic Dynamics in Non-Competitive Complex Adaptive Systems Quito, Marcelino Jr., Monterola, Christopher P., Saloma, Caesar A., 23.) Optical Signal and Image Amplification Studies in Dye-Doped Nematic Liquid Crystal E7 Gabayno, J.L.F., Hermosa, N.P. II, Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.269-272 24.) Effect of Hologram Size on Image Quality Cadatal, Marilou M., Almoro, Percival F., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.83-85 25.) Surface Alignment Effects on the Structural Behavior of Cholesteric Liquid Crystal TM74A:E48 Mixture (60:40 weight ratio) Muldera, J.E., Hermosa, N.P. II, Domingo, Zenaida B., pp.41-44 26.) Surface Profiling of Silicon Wafers Using Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) Almoro, Percival F., Parañal, P., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.429-431 27.) Holography Using a 639 nm Laser Diode and a Digital Photo-camera Manuel, M.A., Cadatal, Marilou M., Almoro, Percival F., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.79-82 28.) On the range of validity of Hilhorst-type formulae Solis, M.R.C., Esguerra, J.P.H., pp.32-34 29.) Third-Order MHD equation: Application to Hartmann Flow Jirkovsky, L., Bo-ot, L., pp.28-31 30.) Spin Wave Self-Energies in the Spin Polaron Formulation Pampolina, J.P., Yanga, D.M., Morales, A.A., Jr., pp.35-36 31.) Dynamics of Wealth Redistribution Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp.195-197 32.) Allelomimesis: Power-laws in social cluster formation Juanico, D.E., Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 109-112 33.) Enhancement of Negative Hydrogen Ions with Xe in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Cardinal, M.G., Ramos, Henry J., pp. 491-494 34.) Decoupled Perturbation in Variational Approach Chan, L.C., pp.25-27 35.) Barbie dolls or GI Joes? Delica, S., Joson, J., Arciaga, M.E., Esguerra, J.P.H., pp. 6-8 36.) Numerical characterization of focused ultra-short Gaussian light pulses Romallosa, Kristine Marie, Bantang, Johnrob, Saloma, Caesar A., 37.) Dynamical features of escape panic: Cellular automata model and experimental verification using mice Perez, G., Tapang, Giovanni, Lim, M., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 126-129 38.) Performance of a Single-Photon Fluorescence Confocal Laser-scanning Microscope Bautista, Godofredo S. Jr., Miranda, Jelda Jayne, Daria, Vincent Ricardo, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 57-59 39.) Wealth Distribution for Different Cooperation Strategies Pulido, M.T., Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp.498-500 40.) Delay Strategies in a Competitive Transportation System Marfil, M., Castro, P., Bantang, Johnrob, Lim, M., Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 293-294 41.) Visualization of Color-Texture Images Using Locally Linear Embedding Marcos, S., Soriano, Maricor, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 86-89 42.) Minimum Negativity Constraint Applied to Fluorescence Color Signal Recovery Oblefias, Wilma, Soriano, Maricor, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 43.) Absolute phase in few-cycle twin-photon pulses Tapang, Giovanni, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 68-70 44.) Multisource Listening is Possibly Enhanced by the Background Violanda, R., Litong-Palima, M., pp.214-216 45.) Conceptual Survey in Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) at the National Institute of Physics Baclig, A.C., Francia, A.Z. Jr., Mahinay, C.L.E., Hermosa, N.P. II, pp. 313-316 46.) New Statistical Model for Foreign Exchange Dynamics Castro, P., Bantang, Johnrob, Lim, M., Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 230-231 47.) Electro-optic Characteristics of Millisecond Response CANCE-doped Twisted Nematic E7 LC Cell Estonactoc, M.F., Rodrigo, P.J., Hermosa, N., pp. 170-173 48.) Spin Dynamics in the Spin Polaron Model at Finite Temperature Pampolina, J.P., Yanga, D.M., Morales, A.A., Jr., pp.95-96 49.) Investigation of the optoelectronic properties of an MBE-grown InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode Manasan, G., Estacio, E., Somintac, A., Salvador, A., pp. 381-383 50.) Measurement of Coefficient of Kinetic Friction using Color Tracking Ibarreta, Rodelio S., Jecong, Julius Federico M., Soriano, Maricor, 51.) Determination of exciton binding energy of AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well as a function of well width using photoluminescence setup and x-ray diffraction technique Casco, M. F., Estacio, E., Somintac, A., Guiao, L.C., Ison, C.S., Salvador, A.A. pp. 384-386 52.) Dynamics of non-motile populations in environment with limited resources Bantang, Johnrob, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 138-141 53.) Effects of spherical aberration in two-color excitation microscopy with two confocal beams Lim, M., Saloma, Caesar A., pp.75-78 54.) Automated analysis of standard behavioral tests on mice using color-based tracking Perez, G., Romallosa, Kristine Marie, Soriano, Maricor, Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia, pp. 134-137 55.) Numerical Simulations of Focusing Properties of a Lensed Optical Fiber Pabilona, R.S., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.71-74 56.) Creating computer generated holograms without wave interference Labora, Maritess J., Almoro, Percival F., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp. 451- 57.) Automated Chromosome Counting with Color and Grayscale Microscope Images Roxas, R.M.L., Castro, P.A.A., Soriano, Maricor, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 142-145 58.) Band Structure Calculation of One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal by Finite Element Method Casulla, E.P., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H. pp.121- 59.) Comparison of cross-correlation and ring-wedge feature extraction in fingerprint recognition Mallari, Astra Kristina B., Soriano, Maricor N., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 414-418 60.) Outline extraction from front-view gait video Araullo, A., Miranda, Jelda Jayne, Dagum, L., Soriano, Maricor N., pp. 146-148 61.) Three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuit defects by 1-photon optical beam-induced current imaging and confocal reflectance microscopy Miranda, Jelda Jayne, Buenaobra, B., Daria, Vincent Ricardo, Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 244-248 62.) Performance comparison of truncation and round-off type sinusoid-crossing sampling, and conventional-amplitude sampling in noise-assisted weak signal detection Cemine, Vernon Julius R., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 210-213 63.) Image Enhancement and Phase Unwrapping of an Interferometric Image Daquiado, F.J.A., Afable, A.B., Tagabuan, J.G., Soriano, Maricor N., pp. 419-421 64.) Laser Diode Controller for Undergraduate Physics Laboratories Separa, S.D., Buenaobra, B., pp.301-304 65.) FABRICATION OF AN AC MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASURE-MENT SYSTEM FOR DLSU SOLID STATE PHYSICS LABORATORY Sarmago, R., 394-399 66.) Pulsed-Laser Deposited TiN2 Coatings On Silicon Substrate Garcia, W., pp.260-264 67.) Wet oxidation of AlAs in GaAs and in an AlAs/GaAs multilayer stack Agra, F.A., Somintac, A., Salvador, A.A., pp.206-209 68.) Hydrogen Raman Shifter: A Promising Light Source for Two-Color (Two-Photon) Excitation Fluorescence Palero, Jonathan A., Garcia, Wilson O., Saloma, Caesar A., pp. 252-255 69.) Cost of Dealing in a Foreign Exchange Market Castro, P.A.A., Lim, M., Monterola, Christopher, P., Saloma, Caesar A., pp.336-338 70.) Determination of the Lateral Diffusion Coefficient of Lecithin -Water Systems Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy Dulay, R.H.B., Domingo, Zenaida B., pp.443-446 71.) Effect of Curing Conditions and Formulation on the Electro-optic Properties of Polymer Dispersed Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Films Mahinay, C.L.E., Afable, A.B., Domingo, Zenaida B., pp. 343-346 72.) Effects of Varying Time and Angle of Unpolarized UV Exposure on the Surface Tension and on the Generated Pretilt Angle of Rubbed Polyimide Films Obias, E.B.R., Marco, R. Jr., Davila, L.T., Domingo, Zenaida B., pp.101-104 73.) POLARIZED LIGHT MICROSCOPY STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF CHLORPROMAZINE CONCENTRATION ON MEMBRANE BILAYER FORMATION Palamine, M.T.L., Estonactoc, M.F., Delica, S.F., pp. 374-376 74.) Investigation of the Liquid Crystalline Properties of Frog Retinal Rods Nombres, C.C., Domingo, Zenaida B., Cureg, R.G., pp. 377-381 75.) Voltage Holding Ratio Characteristics of CANCE-Doped Twisted Nematic E7 Liquid Crystal Sandagon, Ryan, Estonactoc, Melvin F., pp. 501- 76.) Critical Micelle Concentration and Cluster Size Distribution in Binary Lyotropic Liquid Crystal System Calix, Marie Anne Michelle, Domingo, Zenaida B., pp.198-201 77.) Pulse-Retrieval as a High-Dimensional Problem for Generalized Simulated Annealing Alonzo, C.A., Daza, Marlon Rosendo H., pp.289-292 78.) Second Derivative of Langmuir Probe Traces for Particle Temperature Measurements in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Source Noguera, Virginia R., Ramos, Henry J., pp.425-428 79.) Production Efficiency of H- ions from a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Source Noguera, Virginia R., Ramos, Henry J., pp.487-490 80.) Infrared Emission Microscope as a Failure Analysis Tool in the localization of short and open interconnects Mendenilla, A.G., pp. 155-158 81.) Existence and Uniqueness Theorem for the Time Kernel Equation Domingo, Herbert B., Galapon, Eric A., pp.13-16 APPENDIX B. OFFICIAL TRAVELS & FOREIGN POSTINGS
B1. International conferences
1. Henry J. Ramos (oral presentation)
International Workshop on Particle Beam and Plasma Materials Interaction
30 January - 03 February 2002; Chiangmai, Thailand
Funding: Workshop organizers
2. Jose A. MagpantayHumboldt Colloquium11-13 March 2002; Vietnamese Germany Centre, Hanoi, VietnamFunding: Colloquium organizers, PhP1500 pre-travel (UP Faculty Development Fund) 3. Caesar A. Saloma (oral)Focus on Microscopy 200206-11 April 2002, Kaoshiung, TaiwanFunding: PhP 40,045.20 + 1,500.00 pre-travel (UP Faculty Development Fund) 4. Zenaida B. Domingo (poster)19th International Liquid Crystal Conference29 June - 6 July 2002; Edinburg, Scotland, U.K.
Funding: P75,540.00 (UP Faculty Development Fund) 5. Jose Perico H. Esguerra33rd International Physics Olympiad22-31 July 2002; Bali, IndonesiaFunding: DOST-SEI 6. Nathaniel P. Hermosa, II (poster)4th Joint International Symposium on Optical Memory and Optical Storage6-11 July 2002 Walkolon, Hawaii,U.S.AFunding: P84285.90 (CHED CoE) 7. Eric A. Galapon (oral)International Colloquium in Time and Matter11-17 August 2002; Venice International University, Venice, ItalyFunding: P76102.50 (UP Faculty Development Fund) 8. Caesar P. Palisoc (oral)2002 Hadron Collider Physics Conference28-30 September 2002; Karisruhe, GermanyFunding: USD1957.00 (CHED CoE Grant) Arnel A. Salvador (poster) XII International Conference on Molecular Beam Epitaxy15-20 September 2002; San Francisco, California, USAFunding: USD1960.00 (CHED CoE Grant) 10. Caesar A. Saloma (Invited)The Asian Symposium on Biomedical Optics and Photomedicine BOPM200221-23 October 2002; Sapporo, JapanFunding: Conference organizers B2. Other foreign postings
Rex S. AbsinPhD studies 01 June 2001 - 31 May 2002 La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia Carlo Mar Y. BlancaPostdoctoral research 15 October 2001 - 31 December 2002 Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Gottingen, Germany Vincent Ricardo M. DariaPost-doctoral research 1 November 2001 - 31 October 2002 Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Maricor N. SorianoCollaborative research in color and texture 17 May 2002 - 06 June 2002 Machine Vision Group, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Oulu, Finland Cristine DLR. VillagonzaloPostdoctoral research 1 August 2001 - 31 October 2002 Dept. of Physics, West Virginia University Michael HLS WangPostdoctoral research 1 June 2001 - 31 May 2003 Fermi National Accelerator LaboratoryBatavia, Illinois Caesar PalisocPostdoctoral research 1 June 2001 - 31 May 2002; 1 Oct 2002 - 31 December 2002 Second Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg B3. Domestic conference
NIP Participants in the 20th SPP Physics Congress in Naga City on 23-25 October 2002(Support from UP Faculty Development Fund: PhP4,500 per person)1. Kristine Ma. Angelus Bautista Julius Vernon Cemine Clarina de la Cruz Marlon Rosendo Daza 10. Serafin Delica11. Jose Perico Esguerra12. Alberto Francia, Jr.
13. Jacque Lynn Gabayno14. Nathaniel Hermosa, II15. Joihren Joson16. Dranreb Earl Juanico17. Marites Labora18. May Lim19. Cheryll Lei Mahinay20. Ayn Hazel Manuel21. Ma. Sheila Angeli Marcos22. Christopher Monterola23. Wilma Oblefias24. Jonathan Palero25. Marisciel Palima26. Henry J. Ramos27. Caesar Saloma28. Arnel Salvador29. Roland Sarmago30. Armando Somintac31. Maricor Soriano32. Giovanni Tapang APPENDIX C. RESEARCH PROJECTS IN 2002
C1. Funded by NIP Research Funds (1 January 2002 - 31 December 2002)
Amount of Funding: PhP 48,000 (Professor), PhP42,000 (Associate Professor), PhP36,000 (Assistant Professor),PhP30,000 (Instructor) Project Leader
1. Percival F. Almoro Surface Profiling Using Holography 2. Luis Ma. T. Bo-ot Third-Order MHD Equation: Application to Hartmann Flow 3. Lorenzo C. Chan A Quick Perturbation Approach for High Orders 4. Marlon Rosendo H. Daza Transient and Non-local Laser-Induced Birefringence Change in a Dye-Doped Nematic Liquid Crystal 5. Zenaida B. Domingo Fabrication and Characterization of PDLC Windows in the Visible Regimewith Variations 6. Jose Perico H. Esguerra Non-Perturbative Methods in Statistical Mechanics 7. Eric A. Galapon The Quantum Dynamics of Characteristic Time Operators 8. Nathaniel P. Hermosa, II Nonlinear Optical Phenomena in Liquid Crystal Confocality Condition in Two-Color ExcitationMicroscopy with Two-Focused Excitation Beam 10. Jose A. Magpantay Gauge Theories and Quantization 11. Christopher P. Monterola Allelomimesis as a Generic Clustering Mechanism forInteracting Agents 12. Henry J. Ramos Production Efficiency Measurements on aMagnetized Sheet Plasma Source 13. Caesar A. Saloma Two-Color (Two Photon) Fluorescence Excitation witha Raman Shifter 14. Arnel A. Salvador Exciton Binding Energies in GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Wells 15. Roland V. Sarmago AC Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements on YBCO 16. Armando Somintac Epitaxial Growth of InAs Quantum Dots Via MolecularBeam Epitaxy 17. Maricor N. Soriano Gait Analysis from Frontal View Video 18. Giovanni A. Tapang Absolute Phase in Few-Cycle Twin-Photon Pulses 19. Danilo M. Yanga Spin Density Waves (SDW) in the Spin Polaron C2. Research Grants
Roland V. Sarmago,Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements in YBCOPhP 350,000 (October 2001-October 2002)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD Roland V. SarmagoA Study on the Dependence of the AC Magnetic Susceptibility of YbcO on Applied Field and FrequencyDistribution in the Absence of a DC Field BiasPhP 168,000 (1 April 2002 - 31 March 2003)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Arnel A. Salvador,Program for the Development of III-V Optoelectronic Devices and Optoelectronic Integrated CircuitsPhP 7,435,456.00 (November 2001- October 2002)Philippine Council for Advanced Science and Technology Research and Development Arnel A. SalvadorMolecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and Device Fabrication of InGaAs Optoelectronic DevicesPhP 172,000 (1 April 2002 - 31 March 2003)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Henry J. RamosPrototype Plasma Devices for Industrial ApplicationsPhP 4 M [Year 3 (2002)]Department of Science and Technology-Grants in Aid Henry J. RamosDeposition of Amorphous Silicon-based material Using a Magnetized Sheet PlasmaNegative Ion SourcePhP201,000 (1 Dec 2001 - 30 Nov 2002)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Danilo YangaThe Spin Polaron Theory as a Microscopic Mechanism of High SuperconductivityPhP 209,000 (1 Dec 2001 - 30 Nov 2002)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Danilo YangaSpin PolaronsPhP 220,000 (April 2002 – March 2003)National Research Council of the Philippines Jose MagpantayQuantization of Open SystemsPhP 209,000 (1 April 2002 - 31 March 2003)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Marisciel L. PalimaListening Performance is Possibly Aided Under Embedded Speech ConditionsPhP 161, 000 (Oct. 1, 2002-Sept. 30, 2003)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD Spectra from Color: Converting a Microscope Into a Multispectral Imager with a Color CameraPhP 135, 000 (2002)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund Caesar SalomaHow accurate can unsupervised neural networks solve differential equations?PhP 200,000 (1 December 2001 - 30 November 2002)UP System Creative and Research Scholarship Fund May Lim (PhD Thesis Grant)Emergence and detection of nonlinear behavior in complex systemsPhP60, 000 (1 Oct 2002 - 30 Sept 2003)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD Ma. Angeli Sheila Marcos (MS Thesis Grant)Feature Extraction of Coral Reef ImagesPhP 30,000 (October 2002 - April 2003)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD Stephen Daedalus Separa (MS Thesis Grant)Stochastic Resonance in Laser Diode Systems with Optical FeedbackPhP 30,000 (October 2002 - April 2003)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD Michelle Calix (MS Thesis Grant)Self-assembly of a Binary Liquid Crystalline SystemPhP 30,000 (End: October 2002)Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Research and Development, UPD APPENDIX D: NIP Graduates in 2002
D1. PhD graduates (4)
2nd Semester, AY 2001-2002
Christopher P. MonterolaNeural Networks: New Insights and Applications Romeric F. PobreAnalysis of the Radiation Force on a Kerr Micrometer-Sized Sphere Due to a Highly-Focused Gaussian Beam Giovanni A. TapangNoise in the Detection and Processing of Weak Signals: Trade-Offs and Benefits 1st Semester AY 2002-2003
Wilson O. GarciaTemporal Coherence Control of a Q-Switched Frequency Tripled (355 nm) Nd:YAG Pumped Hydrogen Raman Shifter D2. MS graduates (9)
2nd Semester, AY 2001-2002
Johnrob Y. BantangGravity-Assisted Segregation of Elastic Granular Materials Having the Same Mass and Size Elmer S. EstacioPhotoreflectance Spectroscopy of GaAs/ AlGaAs Heterostructures Peter John L. RodrigoMotion Sensing at Diffraction-Limited Resolution with Optical-Feedback Semiconductor Laser Michelson Interferometer 1st Semester AY 2002-2003
Carlo Amadeo C. AlonzoComparison of Pulse-Retrieval Algorithms Applied to Simulated Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) Spectrograms Marie Anne Michelle S. CalixSelf-Assembly of a Binary Lyotropic Liquid Crystalline System Kim A. GargarNumerical and Analytical Studies on Model Gravitating Systems Christine S. IsonOptical Properties of GaAs/AlGaAs Multiple Quantum Wells Probed by Reflectance Spectroscopy Jonathan A. PaleroTwo-Color Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence with Two Confocal Beams and a Raman Shifter Michelee G. PatricioArsenic Flux Dependence of the Mobility and Junction Electric Field of Modulation- Doped GaAs/AlGaAs Heterostructures D3. BS Applied Physics Graduates (14)
2nd Semester AY 2001-2002
Marko E. ArciagaInvestigation of ExB Probe Parameters for Optimum Extraction of H-Ion from a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Source Kristin Maria Angelus N. BautistaGrowth and Characterization of Liquid Phase Epitaxial p-Gallium Arsenide Layers and pn-Junction Marilou M. CadatalTheory and Applications of Phase-Shifting Digital Holography Ma. Gracita C. CardinalEnhancement of Negative Hydrogen Ion Production with Xe Gas in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma Vernon Julius R. CeminePerformance of Sinusoid-Crossing Sampling in Noise-Assisted Weak Signal Detection Jade R. DungaoHolographic Animation of Two-and Three-Dimensional Images Using Angle-Multiplexing in a Z-Cut Fe-Doped (0.05%)LiNbO3 Crystal Melvin F. EstonactocElectro-Optic Response of Directly Addressed Twisted-Nematic Liquid Crystal (E7-CANCE) Cells on Driving VoltageAmplitude and Frequency Jacque Lynn F. GabaynoSignal Amplification in Dye-Doped Nematic Liquid Crystal E7 Joselito E. MulderaStructural Behavior of Cholesteric Liquid Crystal TM75A and TM 74a:E48 Mixture (60:40) with Different Surface AlignmentLayers Rowanie A. NakanDiamond/DLC Deposition on Si Using H2/CH4/O2 Gas Mixture via d.c. plasma CVD Wilma R. OblefiasReconstruction of Fluorescent Color Signal Using Image Color and Principal Component Analysis Ojie L. SantillanEffect of an Extractor Electrode on Ion Beam Focusing in a Plasma Sputter-Type Negative Ion Source Summer 2002
Oamar Nanaig Y. Gianan
Ultrasound Imaging Simulation Using Exact Spatial Impulse Response Solutions and Neural Networks
1st Semester AY 2002-2003
Roselyn S. Pabilonia
Numerical Simulations of Focusing Properties of a Lensed Optical Fiber
D4. BS Physics Graduates (9)
2nd Semester AY 2001-2002
Dranreb Earl O. JuanicoAllelomimesis: A Simple Mechanism for Self-Organized Aggregation Virginia R. NogueraSheet Plasma Negative Ion Source Production Efficiency Measurements Using Second Derivative of I-V Traces Jay Erickson C. TioSimulation of a One Dimensional Photonic Crystal with Defects Summer 2002
Herbert B. Domingo
The Time of Arrival Quantum-Classical Correspondence Problem for Arbitrary Arrival Point
Maylene M. GadjaliGamma Radiation Effects on Thermotropic Transitions of Erythrocyte Lipids Vallerie Ann A. InnisStructural Effects of Estradiol on the Mitochondrial Membranes of Brain Cells of Mice Irradiated in Utero Grace Anne K. NacenoMorphology of the Holographic Gratings in Dye-Doped Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals 1st Semester AY 2002-2003
Ma. Adoracion P. Manuel
Holography Using a 639 nm Laser Diode
Jennifer P. RanayInvestigation of Hydrogen Plasma Parameters for Negative Hydrogen Ion Extraction in a Plasma Sputter-Type Negative IonSource Appendix E: Revised Curriculum Checklists (Dr R Banzon)
Revised Curriculum for Bachelor of Science in Physics
(Effective First Semester 2002-2003)
First Year
Math 14 (Plane Trigonometry)* Physics 101 (Fundamental Physics I) Math 53 (Elem. Analysis I)* Physics 101.1 (Fund. Physics I Lab.) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Math 54 (Elem. Analysis II)* GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Geology 11 (Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Geology 11.1 (Lab in Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Second Year
Physics 102 (Fund. Physics II) Physics 103 (Fund. Physics III) Physics 102.1 (Fund. Physics II Lab.) Physics 103.1 (Fund. Physics III Lab.) Physics 111 (Mathematical Physics I) Physics 112 (Mathematical Physics II) Math 55 (Elem. Analysis III) Math 121.1 (Elem. Diff. Equations) Chemistry 16 (General Chemistry I) Chemistry 17 (General Chemistry II) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Third Year
Physics 104 (Modern Physics I) App Physics 155 (Comp. Methods in Physics 104.1 (Modern Physics I Lab.) Physics 113 (Mathematical Physics III) App Physics 181 (Physical Electronics I) Physics 121 (Theoretical Mechanics I) Physics 122 (Theoretical Mechanics II) Physics 131 (Electromagnetic Theory I) Physics 132 (Electromagnetic Theory II) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Physics 141 (Quantum Physics I) Fourth Year
Physics 114 (Mathematical Physics IV) Biology 11 (Fund. of Biology I) Physics 142 (Quantum Physics II) Physics/App Physics Elective** Physics 165 (Optical Physics) Physics 151 (Statistical Physics I) Physics 170 (Condensed Matter) Physics 180 (Nuclei and Particles) Physics 191 (Experimental Physics I) Physics 192 (Experimental Physics II) GE (Arts & Humanities) Fifth Year
Physics 152 (Statistical Physics II) Physics 196 (Undergrad. Seminar) Physics 199 (Undergrad. Research) Physics 200 (Undergrad. Thesis) Physics/App Physics Elective** Science/Math Elective*** GE (Math, Science & Technology) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Math, Science & Technology) Total Number of Units: 173-181
*Math 14 and Math 53 are to be taken together provided the student has passed the APE in Math 11. Otherwise thestudent must take Math 17 in the First Year/First Semester (in place of Math 14 and Math 53); Physics 71, Physics 71.1and Math 53 in the First Year/Second Semester (in place of Physics 101, Physics 101.1 and Math 54); and Math 54 inthe immediately following Summer Session.
**May be chosen from Physics 135 (Introductory Plasma Physics), Physics 161 (Introductory Laser Physics), Physics 195(Special Topics), or App Physics courses.
***May be chosen, upon the consent of the adviser, from courses in natural sciences or mathematics.
Revised Curriculum for Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics (Materials Physics)
(Effective First Semester 2002-2003)
First Year
Math 14 (Plane Trigonometry)* Physics 101 (Fundamental Physics I) Math 53 (Elem. Analysis I)* Physics 101.1 (Fund. Physics I Lab.) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Math 54 (Elem. Analysis II)* GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Geology 11 (Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Geology 11.1 (Lab in Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Second Year
Physics 102 (Fund. Physics II) Physics 103 (Fund. Physics III) Physics 102.1 (Fund. Physics II Lab.) Physics 103.1 (Fund. Physics III Lab.) Physics 111 (Mathematical Physics I) Physics 112 (Mathematical Physics II) Math 55 (Elem. Analysis III) Math 121.1 (Elem. Diff. Equations) Chemistry 16 (General Chemistry I) Chemistry 17 (General Chemistry II) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Third Year
Physics 104 (Modern Physics I) Physics 105 (Modern Physics II) Physics 104.1 (Modern Physics I Lab.) App Physics 155 (Comp. Methods in Physics 113 (Mathematical Physics III) Physics 121 (Theoretical Mechanics I) App Physics 181 (Physical Electronics I) Physics 131 (Electromagnetic Theory I) Chemistry 28 (Quant. Inorg. Analysis) E.S. 11 (Statics of Rigid Bodies) Chemistry 28.1 (Quant. Inorg. Analysis Lab.) E.S. 13 (Mech. of Deformable Bodies) Fourth Year
App Physics 173 (Solid State Physics) App Physics 171 (Introd. Crystallography) Physics 191 (Experimental Physics I) App Physics 175 (Materials Physics I) Chemistry 153 (Physical Chemistry II) Physics 192 (Experimental Physics II) Chemistry 153.1 (Physical Chemistry II Lab.) Chemistry 112 (Inorganic Chemistry) Geology 40 (Elementary Mineralogy) Biology 11 (Fund. of Biology I) MetE 143 (Elements of Materials Science)** Fifth Year
App Physics 176 (Materials Physics II) Physics 196 (Undergrad. Seminar) App Physics 199 (Undergrad. Research) Physics 200 (Undergrad. Thesis) GE (Math, Science & Technology) GE (Math, Science & Technology) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Total Number of Units: 175-177
*Math 14 and Math 53 are to be taken together provided the student has passed the APE in Math 11. Otherwise the studentmust take Math 17 in the First Year/First Semester (in place of Math 14 and Math 53); Physics 71, Physics 71.1 and Math 53 inthe First Year/Second Semester (in place of Physics 101, Physics 101.1 and Math 54); and Math 54 in the immediatelyfollowing Summer Session.
* * Incorporates previously approved curricular revisions of the College of Engineering (e.g., renaming of E.S. 31 to MetE 143).
Revised Curriculum for Bachelor of Science in Applied Physics (Instrumentation Physics)
(Effective First Semester 2002-2003)
First Year
Math 14 (Plane Trigonometry)* Physics 101 (Fundamental Physics I) Math 53 (Elem. Analysis I)* Physics 101.1 (Fund. Physics I Lab.) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Math 54 (Elem. Analysis II)* GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Geology 11 (Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Geology 11.1 (Lab in Princ. of Geology) GE (Arts & Humanities) Second Year
Physics 102 (Fund. Physics II) Physics 103 (Fund. Physics III) Physics 102.1 (Fund. Physics II Lab.) Physics 103.1 (Fund. Physics III Lab.) Physics 111 (Mathematical Physics I) Physics 112 (Mathematical Physics II) Math 55 (Elem. Analysis III) Math 121.1 (Elem. Diff. Equations) Chemistry 16 (General Chemistry I) Chemistry 17 (General Chemistry II) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) Third Year
Physics 104 (Modern Physics I) Physics 105 (Modern Physics II) Physics 104.1 (Modern Physics I Lab.) App Physics 155 (Comp. Methods in Physics) Physics 113 (Mathematical Physics III) App Physics 181 (Physical Electronics I) Physics 121 (Theoretical Mechanics I) Physics 132 (Electromagnetic Theory II) Physics 131 (Electromagnetic Theory I) EEE 7 (Essentials of Elect. Eng'g. II)** EEE 6 (Essentials of Elect. Eng'g. I)** Fourth Year
App Physics 173 (Solid State Physics) Biology 11 (Fund. of Biology I) App Physics 182 (Physical Electronics II) App Physics 185 (Instru. Physics I) Physics 165 (Optical Physics) Physics 192 (Experimental Physics II) Physics 191 (Experimental Physics I) ECE 123 (Digital Instru. & Control EEE 101 (Control Systems Theory)**,*** GE (Arts & Humanities) Fifth Year
Physics 161 (Introductory Laser Physics) Physics 196 (Undergrad. Seminar) App Physics 186 (Instru. Physics II) App Physics 200 (Undergrad. Thesis) App Physics 199 (Undergrad. Research) GE (Arts & Humanities) GE (Math, Science & Technology) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) GE (Social Science & Philosophy) GE (Math, Science & Technology) Total Number of Units: 174-176
*Math 14 and Math 53 are to be taken together provided the student has passed the APE in Math 11. Otherwise the studentmust take Math 17 in the First Year/First Semester (in place of Math 14 and Math 53); Physics 71, Physics 71.1 and Math 53 inthe First Year/Second Semester (in place of Physics 101, Physics 101.1 and Math 54); and Math 54 in the immediatelyfollowing Summer Session.
**Incorporates previously approved curricular revisions in the EEE program (e.g., renaming of course EE 6 to EEE 6, etc.)***Or equivalent courses that cover the same range of topics (e.g., App Physics 195, etc.) Appendix F: NIP Enrolment and Number of Graduates Data
1. First Semester AY 2001-2002
Number of graduates at the end of the academic year: 194 (Physics) + 15 (App Physics) 2. First Semester AY 2002-2003
Number of graduates at the end of the term: 32 (Physics) + 1 (App Physics) APPENDIX G – NNIP Building Plans
New NNIP Building Plans and Elevation
Ground Floor Plan.
New NNIP Building Second Floor Plan.
New NNIP Building Third Floor Plan.
New NNIP Building Fourth Floor Plan.


New NNIP Building Elevation Showing Main Entrance
APPENDIX H. COST ESTIMATES FOR THE NEW NIP BUILDING.
The proposed phases are delineated in the succeeding page.
APPENDIX I: ESTIMATE OF FURNITURE REQUIREMENTS
(NNIP Phase 2)
Students Desks ( 400 @1700) Includes some desks which will be placed at old NIP In-House Construction Blackboards (55 4'x 8'@700) Materials for 40 old type comp tables, 40 new type comp tables 10 senior type fac tables, 10 junior type fac tables, 50 stools, 30 whiteboards, conference tables ChairsFaculty and Admin (20 @ 3000) Clerical (20 @ 2000) Computer Chairs (50 @ 3000) Steel Cabs(15 @ 5000) Filing Cabs(20 @ 5000) Steel Shelves (6@3000) Educational AVROHP (6 @ 7000) Screens (12@ 3000) TV and DVD player 10 5-ton split type @ 90,000 14 3-ton split type @ 70,000 ESTIMATED GRAND TOTAL
PhP 3,539,500

Source: http://www.nip.upd.edu.ph/sites/default/files/ar/ar2002.pdf

Independent schools inspectorate

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS INSPECTORATE RIPLEY COURT SCHOOL © Independent Schools Inspectorate 2012 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS INSPECTORATE Ripley Court School Full Name of School Ripley Court School Registered Charity Number 312084 Ripley Court SchoolRose LaneRipleySurreyGU23 6NE

helm.lu

Kurze Geschichte des Würfels (unknown author) Jede Erfindung hat ein offizielles Geburtsdatum. Das Geburtsdatum des Würfels ist 1974, das Jahr, in dem der erste funktionsfähige Prototyp entstand und die erste Patentanmeldung entworfen wurde. Der Geburtsort war Budapest, die Hauptstadt Ungarns. Der Name des Erfinders ist inzwischen überall bekannt. Damals war Erno Rubik ein Dozent an der Fakultät für Innenarchitektur an der Akademie der angewandten Kunst in Budapest.